Programs

Disability and Development “Learning from Country Experiences” Series

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The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) has been ratified or acceded by more than 150 countries. The United Nations High Level Meeting on Disability and Development held in 2013 highlighted the need for urgent action by all relevant stakeholders towards implementation of the CRPD and disability-inclusive national policies and programs.

For effective and efficient implementation of disability-inclusive development and realization of true impact on the ground, knowledge sharing on the successes and failures as well as communication and collaboration among countries are critical.

This series features policy makers and key actors in the field of disability from various countries who will share their perspectives, best practices, and lessons learned in their respective countries. The series aims to contribute to sharing and exchange of real experiences and practical, action-oriented knowledge among key stakeholders in the area of disability and development.

Session 1:

Disability and Accessibility:  Lessons from Japan. Dr. Soya Mori, Senior Researcher, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization (IDE-JETRO)

Session 2:

Disability and Economic Development: Lessons from Japan. Dr. Soya Mori, Senior Researcher, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization (IDE-JETRO)

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Universal Health Coverage for Inclusive and Sustainable Development

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Live-webcast


A live web-stream of the event will be available. Click here 5-10 mins before the session starts.

Book Launch Seminar

November 11, 2014
11:30–14:00 (JST)
BookCover_English

The Japan–World Bank Partnership Program on Universal Health Coverage (UHC) has concluded its multi-country study and will be sharing its findings with policy makers and other key stakeholders in Indonesia, Myanmar, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam utilizing TDLC’s distance learning technology and network.

The goals of UHC are to ensure that all people can access quality health services, to safeguard all people from public health risks, and to protect all people from impoverishment due to illness, whether from out-of-pocket payments for healthcare or loss of income when a household member falls sick.

Countries as diverse as Brazil, France, Japan, Thailand, and Turkey have shown how UHC can serve as a vital mechanism for improving the health and welfare of their citizens, as well as lay the foundation for economic growth grounded in the principles of equity and sustainability. Eleven country studies (Bangladesh, Brazil, Ethiopia, France, Ghana, Indonesia, Japan, Peru, Thailand, Turkey, Vietnam) have been synthesized into a publication titled, “Universal Health Coverage for Inclusive and Sustainable Development: A Synthesis of 11 Country Case Studies.” In addition, the initiative resulted in an in-depth report on Japan’s experience entitled “Universal Health Coverage for Inclusive and Sustainable Development: Lessons from Japan.”

The distance Seminar will cover key findings from the 11 country case studies and will convene principal researchers from the Japan study to discuss Japan’s role in promoting UHC abroad.

Date and Time:

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Tokyo: 11:30 – 14:00
Manila: 10:30 – 13:00
Bangkok: 9:30 – 12:00
Hanoi: 9:30 – 12:00
Jakarta: 9:30 – 12:00
Yangon: 9:00 – 11:30

Target Audience:

Policy makers, health professionals, government officials, development practitioners in Japan and East Asia.

Language:

English only

Connecting Sites:

Bangkok, Thailand:
Chulalongkorn University Thailand Center of Academic Resources Development Learning Center
Hanoi, Vietnam:
Vietnam Development Information Center, The World Bank
Jakarta, Indonesia:
University of Indonesia Distance Learning Center
Manila, The Philippines:
Asian Institute of Management Development Resource Center
Yangon, Myanmar:
The World Bank Yangon Office

Scheduled Program:

11:30 – 11:40 (JST)

Opening Remarks and Introduction
Tomoyuki Naito, Manager, Tokyo Development Learning Center, The World Bank
Akiko Maeda, Lead Health Specialist, Health, Nutrition and Population Global Practice, World Bank Group (Moderator)

11:40 – 11:55 (JST)

Overview of the 11 Country Case Studies – Objectives and Key Findings
Akiko Maeda, Lead Health Specialist, Health, Nutrition and Population Global Practice, World Bank Group

11:55 – 12:05 (JST)

Q & A

12:05 – 12: 20 (JST)

Political Economy of UHC Policies
Michael Reich, Taro Takemi Professor of International Health Policy, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health

12:20 – 12:30 (JST)

Q & A

12:30 – 12:50 (JST) 
Lessons from Japan: What Japan Can Share from its Experience
Naoki Ikegami, Professor and Chair, Department of Health Policy and Management, Keio School of Medicine

12:50 – 13:00 (JST)

Q & A

13:00 – 13:10 (JST)

Macro Process of Health Policy Making in Japan
John Campbell, Project Researcher, Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo University; Professor Emeritus of Political Science, University of Michigan

13:10 – 13:20 (JST)

Q & A

13:20 – 14:00 (JST)

Discussion and Conclusion
Moderator: Akiko Maeda

Related Links

The World Bank website on Health: Universal Health Coverage for Inclusive and Sustainable Development

 

 

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The New Engine of Global Economy: the Internet Economy

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Live-webcast


A live web-stream of the event will be available. Click here 5-10 mins before the session starts.

Presentation Materials
Seminar 1:
Tenzin_Dolma_Norbhu_WB.pdf
Lingfang_(Ivy)_Li_China.pdf
Mr._Hayashi_Japan.pdf

AFDC Distance Learning Seminar Series

Seminar 1: October 15, 2014 15:00-17:00 (Tokyo Time)
Seminar 2: November 14, 2014 15:00-17:30 (Tokyo Time)
*TDLC will not be hosting participants at our Center for Seminar 2. A live webcast will be available on the day of the event.

Chinese migrant to the city learns IT skills_Li Wenyong / World Bank
Li Wenyong/The World Bank

Background

There’s no need to further demonstrate the fact that the Internet has the power to shape the world. On the one hand, it has penetrated into almost every field of global economy and social lives and serves as a basic element in spurring social and economic development; on the other hand, it carries on the integration with traditional industries and thus, brings about new sources of economic growth. The Internet is driving the constant reforms in the economic system, industrial structure, and economic and social development worldwide. It’s the prerequisite in gaining an advantageous status in global competition and innovation in the future.

It’s estimated by McKinsey that in 2025, the Internet technology along with other new technologies will bring about new economic growth and exert far-reaching influence on the world economy, contributing to 0.5 to 0.7 percent growth in global economic development trend value and 1 percent decrease in the inflation rate worldwide. Besides, enterprises’ operation has been influenced a lot by the Internet economy—business operators have to relieve themselves from the traditional ways of doing business, upgrade their mindset, seize the opportunities and face the challenges brought by the new business model and emerging service industry.

In the wake of the financial crisis, China and other developing countries in the Asia-Pacific region are in urgent need of carrying out economic transformation and upgrading. The Internet is playing an increasingly important role in this regard. As the propeller of the new economic development, the Internet has created a brand-new model for economic development, generates tremendous economic and social benefits, and poses an overwhelming influence on the traditional economic model. It’s safe to say that the Internet has become the driving force for the development of emerging economies in the Asia-Pacific region and the whole world.
How can we digest the huge changes in the Internet-influenced global economy? What can the developing countries do to cope with opportunities and challenges in the Internet economy era? What kind of reforms should the business operators adopt to upgrade their business model?

Objective

In order to summarize and share experience on “Internet Economy”, AFDC plans to launch a series of VC seminars in 2014 in collaboration with the World Bank and other GDLN affiliates to cope with opportunities and challenges in the Internet economy era.

Target Audience

Government officials, researchers and experts - particularly from EAP and South Asian countries - in the field of Internet economy.
Representatives from civil society, academia and private sector, etc.

Program

Seminar 1

Date:

October 15, 2014

15:00-15:10 Welcome Remarks
AFDC & WB & GDLN-AP centers
Overview of the program
Brief introduction of GDLN-AP centers
Moderator: Dr. Ji Rui (Jerry)

15: 10-15:45 Session 1: The framework and global perspective
Ms. Tenzin Dolma Norbhu, Lead ICT Policy Specialist, The World Bank
Q&A Session

15:45-16:20 Session 2: China’s Experience
Ms. Lingfang (Ivy) Li, Associate Professor, Department of Industrial Economics, School of Management, Fudan University
Q&A Session

16:20-16:55 Session 3: Japan’s Experience
Mr. Hirosato Hayashi, Director, Economic Research Office, 
Global ICT Strategy Bureau, Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, 
The Government of Japan
Q&A Session

16:55-17:00 Wrap-up and Closing
Moderator: Dr. Ji Rui (Jerry)

Seminar 2

Date:

November 14, 2014
We will not be hosting participants at TDLC for Seminar 2.
Please view the live webcast by accessing here.

15:00-15:10 Welcome Remarks
AFDC & WB & GDLN-AP centers
Overview of the program
Brief introduction of GDLN-AP centers
Moderator: Dr. Ji Rui (Jerry)

15:10-15:55 Session 1: The framework and global perspective
Speaker from The World Bank (TBA)
Q&A Session

15:55-16:40 Session 2: China’s Experience
Speaker from China (TBA)
Q&A Session

16:40-17:25 Session 3: Korea’s Experience
Speaker from Korea (TBA)
Q&A Session

17:25-17:30 Wrap-up and Closing
Moderator: Dr. Ji Rui (Jerry)


AFDC logoKDI logoGDLN_AP logo

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PFA Orientation: Mutual Support for Resiliency after Crisis 3

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Multi-country Orientation Videoconferences

September 17, 2014 15:00-18:30(JST)
Participating countries:Indonesia, Japan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand

Cover of PFA Guide
Cover of PFA Field Guide

In close partnership with WHO, together with United Nations University International Institute for Global Health (UNU-IIGH) and Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) will host a video conference session on Psychological First Aid (PFA) for health and Disaster Risk Management (DRM) stakeholders in Asia and the Pacific.

TDLC will deliver an interactive learning opportunity for policy makers and other change agents engaged in DRM to learn the basics of PFA, raise awareness on importance to integrate mental health and psychosocial perspectives in their respective DRM policies/programs, and develop capacity to provide safe support in crisis situation.

The main author of the WHO Field Guide, Dr. Leslie Snider will serve as the main speaker for this session.

The orientation is structured as a 3.5 hour VC session.
It will cover the fundamentals of PFA, dos and don’ts, self-care techniques, interactive Q&As, role-plays, and open discussion.
A certificate of attendance will be provided at the end of the program.

Speakers:

Dr. Shekhar Saxena, Director, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, WHO (video message)
Dr. Leslie Snider, Consultant (facilitator)
Mr. Ananda Galappatti, Director (Strategy), The Good Practice Group (facilitator)
Dr. Asami Onuma, National Institute of Mental Health, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan (moderator)
Takashi Izutsu, Senior Knowledge Management Officer, TDLC (moderator)

Participating Countries:

Indonesia
Japan
Philippines
Sri Lanka
Thailand

Webcast

This session will be webcast live. 
Click here 5-10 mins before the session starts.

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Session 5: HLMDD-International Disability NGO

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Discussion on the UN High-level Meeting on Disability and Development

2014






Venus Ilagan, Secretary General of Rehabilitation International, an international non-governmental organization for the advancement of rights and inclusion of persons with disabilities, speaks about how the recommendations and decisions made at the HLMDD can and should be utilized as a policy tool in various levels in different countries. She stresses that disability is a part of human diversity, and persons with disabilities are able to contribute to society if lack of access, discrimination, and poverty are properly addressed. 

Speaker:

Ms. Venus Illagan, Secretary General, Rehabilitation International

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Session 4: HLMDD-JICA

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Discussion on the UN High-Level Meeting on Disability and Development

2014







Dr. Kenji Kuno, Senior Advisor on social welfare for the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) speaks about JICA’s expectations for the field and practice of disability and development based on the outcome document of the HLMDD. He introduces lessons learned from JICA’s projects as well as the challenges in the field for the future. He explains that it is crucial to change the society and environment rather than trying to change the individual, calling for the necessity to follow a twin-track approach, of empowerment and enablement, to promote equal opportunity for and full participation of persons with disability in development processes.

Speaker:

Dr. Kenji Kuno, Senior Advisor (Social Welfare), Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)

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JSDF: New Livelihoods for Artisans and Craftspeople in Rural India

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Related Links

To learn more about Jiyo! Project or to visit their e-commerce site:
http://www.jiyo.net.in/

World Bank Public Seminar - JSDF Dialogue Series "Jiyo! Project: Creating New Livelihood for Artisans and Crafts people in Rural

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 17:30-19:00pm (JST)
JiyoBanner

The World Bank’s Global Partnerships and Trust Fund Operations Department in cooperation with the Tokyo Development Learning Center and the World Bank Tokyo Office, will hold the seventh Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) Dialogue Series on May 28, 2014, 17:30-19pm.

This session will highlight the challenges and achievements of one of the JSDF’s projects in India, namely, “Making Globalization Work for the Rural Poor in India” by bringing together key stakeholders involved in the project.

This seminar will present an overview of the project, the innovative aspects of its preparation, planning and execution as well as lessons learned and results to date. The beneficiaries will connect via videoconferencing and share their rich experiences as active members in the planning and execution of the project.

“Making Globalization Work for the Rural Poor in India” project has been developed in direct response to the demand from the rural community members in India at the bottom of the pyramid - the very poor, vulnerable and landless communities - whose livelihoods depend upon traditional cultural industries. The development objective of the project is to help the poor communities to set up and strengthen their own self-managed grassroots cluster level institutions to access decent sustainable livelihoods on a long term basis.

craftspeople in Jiyo Project

This project enhanced the livelihood opportunities and share of rural artisans in the market for cultural industries and related sectors in the Indian states of Andhra Pradesh, and Bihar which are among the poorest in India but are traditionally known for their rich cultural heritage, and where Bank assisted livelihood programs are on-going. Through helping poor artisan communities to establish/strengthen and manage their own cluster level institutions, the grant helped set-up mechanisms for decentralized decision-making and resource allocation for strengthening local artisan communities’ capacity to manage their own economic activity competitively.

Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF)


The Government of Japan and the World Bank established JSDF in June 2000, with the goal of providing grants to support community-driven development and poverty reduction projects that empower and directly improve the lives of the poorest and most vulnerable groups not reached by other programs. A unique and valued feature of the JSDF program is that it provides a platform for cooperation with non-governmental agencies and other local stakeholders in the development process. The Government of Japan has given support to over 300 social development programs and projects, up to the end of June 2013.

Registration


To attend, please register online from the link below. (Please refrain from using the “Contact Form” below.”)
Admission is free.
As seating is limited, registration will be on a first come, first served basis.
For inquiries, please email the World Bank Tokyo Office, ptokyo@worldbankgroup.org
Registration Form

日本の旗 JSDF

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Session 3: HLMDD-World Report on Disability

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Discussion on the UN High-level Meeting on Disability and Development

2014






Aleksandra Posarac, program leader at the World Bank Manila Office worked as an advisor on disability issues for five years until 2013 at the World Bank headquarters in Washington D.C. She is also one of the authors of the World Report on Disability, published by the World Bank and the World Health Organization in 2011. From this experience, she talks about the significance of the HLMDD and what the World Bank and other development partners can do to implement or help the various governments implement the recommendations and decisions made in the HLMDD. Reiterating that disability should not be the reason for exclusion or discrimination in an inclusive development process, she also describes the role that the World Report on Disability has played in informing the HLMDD.

Speaker:

Ms. Aleksandra Posarac, Program Leader
EAP Country Unit, The World Bank

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Session 2: HLMDD-The United Nations

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Discussion on the UN High-level Meeting on Disability and Development

2014






Ms. Akiko Ito, Chief, Secretariat for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA), United Nations explains about the background and the outcome document of the first ever, UN High-Level Meeting on Disability and Development. The UN has a long standing commitment to the equality and full participation of persons with disabilities in society and development. She urges that to achieve a disability-inclusive post-2015 development agenda, it is critical that the outcome document of the HLMDD be translated in to real changes at national and local levels. She calls action for all to make development inclusive, accessible, sustainable and equitable for everybody.

Speaker:

Ms. Akiko Ito, Chief, Secretariat for the CRPD, DESA, United Nations
Language: English

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Disability and Economic Development: Lessons from Japan

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Video Lecture

April 2014






About 15% of the world’s population lives with some form of disability, and the number is growing. This is due to the ageing population – older persons have a higher risk of disability – and the increase in chronic health conditions associated with disability, such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and mental illness on a global scale. It is impossible to achieve development goals if 15% of the world population are ignored or excluded.

Persons with disabilities are more likely to be unemployed and generally earn less even when employed. On average, employment rate of persons with disabilities was over half that for persons without disabilities. However, at the same time, persons with disabilities may have extra costs for personal support or for medical care or assistive devices. Economic contributions of persons with disabilities and their family would be promoted if barriers are addressed and accessibility is ensured.  (From the World Report on Disability. WHO and the World Bank, 2011)

Dr. Soya Mori, Senior Researcher at the Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization (IDE-JETRO), lectures on disability and economic development based on his research and experience in Japan and in the world.

With sign language (ASL), voice-over and caption.

Lecturer

Dr. Soya Mori, Senior Researcher, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization (IDE-JETRO)

About the Video

In American Sign Language (ASL), voice-over and caption.

Soya Mori, Senior Researcher at the Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO) speaks on the topic of disability and economic development, highlighting some key issues in forming disability-inclusive policies in developing countries by introducing some examples from Japan and some developing countries. He shed light on the close link between disability and poverty, and argued for advancing the rights of persons of disability, providing access to decent employment, and empowering persons of disability in the processes of development.

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Disability and Accessibility:  Lessons from Japan

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Video Lecture

April 2014






Across the world, persons with disabilities have poorer health outcomes, lower education achievements, less economic participation and higher rates of poverty than persons without disabilities. This is partly because persons with disabilities experience barriers in accessing services, transport, information among others.

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006) highlights the role of the environment in facilitating or restricting participation for persons with disabilities. For example, removing barriers in public accommodations, transport, information, and communication will enable persons with disabilities to participate in education, employment, and social life, reducing their isolation and dependency. Across domains, key requirements for addressing accessibility and reducing negative attitudes are access standards; cooperation between the public and private sector a lead agency responsible for coordinating implementation; training in accessibility; universal design for planners, architects, and designers; user participation; and public education. These are cost effective, and will contribute to well-being of aging populations and beyond. (From the World Report on Disability. WHO and the World Bank, 2011)

Dr. Soya Mori, Senior Researcher at the Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization (IDE-JETRO) lectures on disability and accessibility based on his experience in Japan and in the world.

Lecturer

Dr. Soya Mori, Senior Researcher, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization (IDE-JETRO)

About the Video

In American Sign Language (ASL), voice-over and caption.

Soya Mori, Senior Researcher at the Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO) speaks on the topic of disability and accessibility, pointing out the key issues at the policy-making level when realizing accessibility in developing countries. He mentions that it’s not always important to make large-scale investments such as constructions, but it is important to provide needed services within a community, even if they are implemented on a smaller scale. There is no single technology or method that provides a solution to inaccessibility. Persons with disability themselves are the ones who know best about the needs and methods for accessibility. They should be involved in the process to select the best option that strikes a good balance of effectiveness and cost for realizing accessibility.

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PFA Orientation: Mutual Support for Resiliency after Crisis 2

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Multi-country Orientation Videoconferences

April 11, 2013 14:00-17:30 (JST)/13:00-16:30 (ULAT)
Connecting sites: Japan, Mongolia, Philippines, Sri Lanka

PFA_Dec13
Dr. Snider lecturing at TDLC on December 13, 2013

In close partnership with WHO, together with United Nations University International Institute for Global Health (UNU-IIGH) and Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) will host a video conference session on PFA for health and Disaster Risk Management (DRM) stakeholders in Asia and the Pacific.

TDLC will deliver an interactive learning opportunity for policy makers and other change agents engaged in DRM to learn the basics of PFA, raise awareness on importance to integrate mental health and psychosocial perspectives in their respective DRM policies/programs, and develop capacity to provide safe support in crisis situation.

The main author of the WHO Field Guide, Dr. Leslie Snider, Sr. Programme Advisor of the War Trauma Foundation will be onsite in Mongolia and serve as the main speaker for this session.

The orientation is structured as a 3.5 hour VC session.
It will cover the fundamentals of PFA, dos and don’ts, self-care techniques, interactive Q&As, role-plays, and open discussion.

Speakers:

Dr. Shekhar Saxena, Director, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, WHO (video message)
Dr. Leslie Snider, Sr. Programme Advisor of the War Trauma Foundation (main speaker)
Dr. Atsuro Tsutsumi, Coordinator, United Nations University International Institute for Global Health (moderator/facilitator)
Dr. Ryoko Ohtaki, National Information Center of Disaster Mental Health, Japan (moderator/facilitator)
Takashi Izutsu, Senior Knowledge Management Officer, TDLC (moderator/facilitator)

Participating countries:

Japan
Mongolia
Philippines
Sri Lanka

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The Pattern of Global Trade: Opportunities and Challenges for the Emerging Economics

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Presentation Files

Session 1

Mr._Xu_Mingqui_China.pdf
Mr._Pham_Vietnam.pdf
Prof._Abe_Japan.pdf

Session 2

Mr._Chen_China.pdf
Mr._Shadikhodjaev_Korea.pdf
Mr._Rasagam_WB.pdf

Access the archived video from here.

Seminar 2: Free Trade Zone: International experience and local development

June 10, 2014
13:00 -15:30 (JST)

Containers at a port
Dominic Sansoni/World Bank

As the world economy becomes more globalized, the developing countries, which account for over 40 percent of the global trade, play an increasingly important role in global economy and trade. Since the financial crisis, the global economic and trade pattern has been readjusted, and new rules of global trade, which pursue higher liberalization in business operation, investment and services, and emphasize more on fair competition and protection of rights and interests, have been established. The new pattern may to a large extent reshape the external environment of the emerging economies and reconstruct the global economic value chain, and thus may again repel the emerging economies, including China, to the edge of the international trade system. Emerging economies are therefore confronted with severe challenges to establish more reasonable economic and trade policies for the purpose of playing an even more active role in the global economy and boosting sustainable local economic development.

In recent years, China witnessed a rapid growth in its foreign trade. In 2012, China has surpassed the US to become the world’s biggest trade country with its overall foreign trade volume reaching $3.87 trillion. However, like the other developing countries, China lacks diversity in its foreign trade structure and received limited sharing in global value chains. Therefore, it’s of China’s top priority to further develop trade in services and enhance its level of investment liberalization to be further integrated into the global economy and contribute to its economic and structural transformation and upgrading.

This program is jointly organized by the Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Center (AFDC), Korean Development Institute (KDI) School of Public Policy and Management, The World Bank, and the WB Tokyo Development Learning Center.

In order to summarize and share experience on“the New Pattern of Global Trade”, AFDC plans to launch a series of VC seminars in 2014 in collaboration with the World Bank and other GDLN affiliates to cope with opportunities and challenges for the emerging economies.

Program Description

Seminar 2: Free Trade Zone: International experience and local development

Date: June 10, 2014
Time: 13:00 -15:30 (JST)

The framework and global perspective

Mr. Ganesh Rasagam, Lead Private Sector Development Specialist, The World Bank

Experience sharing

Mr. Bo Chen, Associate Department Head, Shanghai University of Finance and Economics
Mr. Sherzod Shadikhodjaev, Professor, KDI School
Moderator: Dr. Ji Rui, Senior Economist, Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Center

Seminar 1: Global Trade Facilitation-Trends and Challenges

Date: April 9, 2014
Time: 11:30 -14:00 (JST)

The framework and global perspective

Mr. Duc Minh Pham, Senior Economist, the World Bank

Experience sharing

Prof. Xu Mingqi, Professor & Director, Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences
Mr. Shigeyuki Abe, Professor, Doshisha University, Faculty of Policy Studies
Moderator: Dr. Ji Rui, Senior Economist, Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Center

Archived Video

An archived video of this seminar is available on AFDC website.

Target audience

Policy makers from central & local government agencies, particularly from EAP and South Asian countries - in the field of global economy and trade.
Representatives from civil society, academia and private sector, etc.

Registration

Advance registration required (first-come-first-served).
Please register by sending us an email or using the form below, indicating your name, organization, telephone number, e-mail address.

AFDC logoWB logoKDI logo

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Session 1: HLMDD-The World Bank

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Discussion on the UN High-level Meeting on Disability and Development

2014






The World Bank Group stated at the UN High-Level Meeting on Disability and Development (HLMDD) held on September 23, 2013, that the development consequences of disability cannot be ignored, and unless persons with disability are included into the post-2015 development agenda, the agenda will fail to be truly inclusive. The HLMDD is a historic event and its outcome should be understood and implemented by as many stakeholders as possible. This session will highlight the basic facts on disability and the outcome of HLMDD to guide efforts towards the creation of a fully inclusive society through 2015 and beyond.

Speaker:

Ms. Anush Bezhanyan
Sector Manager, Social Protection & Labor,
Human Development Network, The World Bank

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Introduction to Islamic Finance 2014

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Related Program
Introduction to Islamic Finance

Session Dates Changed
March 12, 2014 until March 27, 2014
13:00-16:00 (East Africa Time)
19:30-22:00 (Japan Standard Time)
Please note we are not accepting participants from Japan.







Workers gathering at desk  Arne Hoel/The World Bank

Introduction

Islamic finance has been growing rapidly in recent years and attracting greater attention in the wake of the recent financial crisis. The World Bank and the Islamic Development Bank have set out a framework for collaboration between the two parties and lend support to global, regional and country efforts in the development and expansion of Islamic finance globally.
 
In 2012, the total global assets of Islamic banking were $1.3 trillion, which is estimated to be $1.6 trillion by the end of 2013. Statistics by Global Islamic Finance Report show that Islamic finance grew consecutively at a compound annual rate of 15 to 20 % over the last decades. Most interestingly, Islamic financial system has proved inherent resistance to the recent global economic crises during 2008 to 2012.

There are two fundamental directions of financial inclusion or access of finance under the present practices of Islamic finance activities. They are – (a) promoting risk sharing contracts that is to generate alternative debt sharing finance comparatively different from the conventional debt based finance. This is enough potential for enhancing accesses to the required finance and its proper conflict free and sustainable management. (b) Redistribution of the wealth of the society among its member that is, in principle, complement to the prior direction, targeting of the poor people of the society in order to provide a comprehensive financial approach for exterminating poverty and for building resilient and equity based society.

In 2012, with the initiative of the Association of African Distance Learning Center (AADLC) , in partnership with the Global Development Learning Network (GDLN) and the Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC), a comprehensive course “Introduction to Islamic Finance” was designed and organized to share fundamentals of Islamic finance with a special focus on policy makers and officials of the financial sector in Africa.
 
This program will be the second delivery following the success of the first program delivered in 2012

Learning Contents

Each module will feature presentations and interactive discussions on current issues and best practices in Islamic finance with international experts. The program will be delivered in three modules as follows.

Session 1: Introduction to Islamic Finance – presenting definition and fundamentals of Islamic finance;  global trend and estimated growth of the sector; overview of emerging markets, products, and services in Islamic finance; and geographical expansion of Islamic Finance.
(March 12, 2014)

Session 2: Understanding Islamic Finance structures – presenting basic models of Islamic finance (trade-based and investment-based models); and various financial products and transaction models (loans, deposits, Sukuk-bonds, funds, Takaful-insurance) with practical examples.
(March 19, 2014)

Session 3: Establishing Islamic Finance Architecture: an African model – presenting legal system on Islamic finance;  legal issues under Islamic finance; financial framework for financial inclusion; case studies and best practices in Africa/different regions; recent trends in Islamic finance and Africa; and networking and further study opportunities in Islamic finance.
(March 27, 2014)

Goals

After attending the program, participants will be able to;

  • Describe fundamental concepts in Islamic finance and its growth potential,
  • Structure financial products and mechanisms under Islamic finance,
  • Understand key actors and roles in regulating, supervising and monitoring, and
  • Broaden understanding from practical lessons and case studies around the world on Islamic finance

Speaker

Mr. Etsuaki Yoshida

Adjunct Research Fellow, Center for Finance Research,  Waseda University, Tokyo.
Director and Senior Economist, Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC).


Mr. Yoshida has been teaching Islamic finance at the Waseda Graduate School of Finance as a visiting associate professor. He is also Director and Senior Economist at Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC). Before moving to JBIC in 2007, he was an economist at Bank of Japan in charge of the Japanese economy and foreign exchange markets.


Moderator

Session#1
Mr. Mor Seck, Senegal, Manager/Director Senegal Distance Learning Centre and President of the Association of African Distance learning Centers (AADLC)

Session#2-3
Mr. Charles Y. Senkondo, Secretary General of the Association of African Distance learning Centers (AADLC), and Director of Tanzania Global Learning Agency –TaGLA

Target Audience

National and local government officials from financial ministries and agencies.

Officers from commercial banks, legal department, insurance, security and asset management companies.

Staff from microfinance institutions and NGOs who wish to develop knowledge on Islamic finance for their business activities in Africa.

Financial sector staff from international organizations.

Delivery Method

You can participate in the program at your nearest GDLN center.

Each session will be a 2.5-hour interactive session using video conference technology.

Each session consists of presentations followed by Q&A and open discussion.

Lecture materials will be provided at the GDLN centers.

Webcasting (live streaming via Internet) will be available for the sessions. Please view the live web streaming from here.  (Windows Media Player is required.)

Language

English only

How to Apply

Please contact your nearest distance learning center.

Participating DLCs:

Tanzania
Uganda
Madagascar

If you cannot join from a DLC nearest you, you can also watch the webstreaming.

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PFA Orientation: Mutual Support for Resiliency after Crisis 1

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Multi-country Orientation Videoconferences

December 13, 2013 14:00-17:30 (JST)
Connecting countries:
China, Japan, Nepal, Thailand, Vietnam

In close partnership with WHO, together with United Nations University International Institute for Global Health (UNU-IIGH) and Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) will host a video conference session on PFA for health and Disaster Risk Management (DRM) stakeholders in Asia and the Pacific.

Cover of PFA Guide
Cover of PFA Field Guide

Having the main author of the WHO Field Guide, Dr. Leslie Snider, Sr. Programme Advisor of the War Trauma Foundation as the main speaker, TDLC will deliver an interactive learning opportunity for policy makers and other change agents engaged in DRM to learn the basics of PFA, raise awareness on importance to integrate mental health and psychosocial perspectives in their respective DRM policies/programs, and develop capacity to provide safe support in crisis situation.

The orientation is structured as a 3.5 hour VC session.
It will cover the fundamentals of PFA, dos and don’ts, self-care techniques, interactive Q&As, role-plays, and open discussion.

Speakers:

Dr. Shekhar Saxena, Director, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, WHO (video message)
Dr. Leslie Snider, Sr. Programme Advisor of the War Trauma Foundation (main speaker)
Dr. Yoshiharu Kim, Director of National Information Center of Disaster Mental Health in Japan (moderator)
Takashi Izutsu, Senior Knowledge Management Officer, TDLC (facilitator)

Participating countries:

China
Japan
Nepal
Thailand
Vietnam

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“Mental Well-being, Disability, and Development”

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

Related News:
Report on the Panel Discussion on Mental Well-being, Disability, and Development

Celebrating International Day of Persons with Disabilities

December 3, 2013
11:30am-1:00pm (EST)


There is strong stigma and discrimination against persons with mental or intellectual disabilities. In disaster or conflict settings in particular, the needs of persons with mental or intellectual disabilities are often neglected. In the United Nations Expert Group Meeting on Mental Well-being, Disability and Development held in April 2013, the expert group concluded that 1) mental well-being should be integrated into all the social development efforts as a key indicator for sustainable development, and 2) protection and promotion of the rights of persons with mental or intellectual disabilities should be integrated and strengthened as a key priority in disability-related policies and programs.

On December 3, in celebration of International Day of Persons with Disabilities, which aims to raise awareness and mobilize support for critical issues related to the inclusion of persons with disabilities in society and development, WBTDLC, UN/DESA, and UNU-IIGH will conduct a panel discussion on mental well-being, disability and development at the UN Headquarters in NY. Topics such as mental or intellectual disabilities, and mental well-being as a priority in development with special attention to the life cycle perspective and its emphasis on people-centered approaches to development will be discussed.

Date:

December 3, 2013

Time:

11:30am-1:00pm (EST)

Language:

English

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Training of Trainers (ToT) on Psychological First Aid (PFA)

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center December 9-12, 2013
Location: Arcadia Ichigaya

WHO in collaboration with its partners published “Psychological First Aid: Field Guide” (PFA Field Guide) in 2011 to provide an easy-to-understand guidance on what to do and what not to do when trying to support a fellow human being after going through a serious crisis event. The PFA Field Guide has been endorsed by the UN, UNICEF, UNHCR,  International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), Plan International, among others, and the UN Secretary General mandated the PFA training for human resources and security personnel in the UN worldwide. The PFA has been widely employed in Japan after the Great East Japan Earthquake.

TDLC together with the National Information Center of Disaster Mental Health (Japan) and the United Nations University will host a 4-day training of trainers (ToT) on PFA at Arcadia Ichigawa.

Dr. Leslie Snider, Sr. Advisor, War Trauma Foundation, who is one of the main authors of the “WHO PFA Field Guide” will facilitate the session.

This ToT training is intended for municipal government officials from disaster-prone areas in Japan, disaster/humanitarian response experts, members of the Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT), Japan, and constituencies from the education sector.

Date:

December 9-12, 2013

Training Schedule:

Day 1 & 2: Lectures, role play-base learning, and discussions.
Day 3: Group-based practical training with supervisors
Day 4: Reflections, discussions, ethics on disseminating PFA, wrap-up

Location

Arcadia Ichigaya

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Suicide Prevention: How to Address One Million Deaths a Year, Toward the World Suicide Report

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

Resources

mhGAP_Intervention Guide eng.pdf
Public Health Action for the Prevention of Suicide eng.pdf
Mental Health Action Plan 2013 - 2020 eng.pdf

 

;

Co-organized with

the United Nations University International Institute for Global Health and the University of Tokyo

Special Thanks to

The World Health Organization (WHO)

Panelists

Dr. Shekhar Saxena, Director, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, WHO
Dr. Lakshmi Vijayakumar, SNEHA, Suicide Prevention Centre, India
Dr. Tadashi Takeshima, Director, National Institute of Mental Health, NCNP

Background

WHO estimates that almost one million deaths are due to suicide every year, the majority of which occur in low- and middle-income countries.  Attempted suicide can be up to 20 times more frequent than suicide. As suicide is among the top three causes of death in the population aged 15-34 years (second leading cause for 10-24 year olds) globally, there is a massive loss to societies of young people. There is a need for immediate action which includes public health and cross-sector/inter-agency approaches.

Goals

To respond to this neglected but important global priority, WHO will launch the first-ever World Suicide Report. As part of the process, international experts get together in Tokyo to discuss variety of aspects of suicide. Taking this opportunity, the World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center together with the United Nations University International Institute for Global Health in collaboration with the University of Tokyo presents the distance seminar to highlight key statistics, and an evidence-based solution which have been found in the development process of the report.

Speakers and Audience

The Director of the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, WHO, will give a presentation the current global situation and WHO’s response. An expert from India will talk about her success in working on suicide prevention in communities in India. An expert from Japan will share Japan’s experience in successfully having decreased number of suicide deaths.  Main targets are policy makers and other key stakeholders engaged in national system and policy development.

Resources

mhGAP_Intervention Guide eng.pdf
Public Health Action for the Prevention of Suicide eng.pdf
Mental Health Action Plan 2013 - 2020 eng.pdf

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High-level Meeting on Disability and Development (HLMDD) Series

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center December 3, 2013






For more details on individual sessions in this series, please visit the session pages linked in the sidebar.

The UN High-Level Meeting on Disability and Development (HLMDD) was held at the level of Heads of State and Government, with participation of the World Bank and other UN agencies, as well as more than 800 representatives of organizations of persons with disabilities, and the UN Messenger of Peace Stevie Wonder, in the United Nations General Assembly, on September 23, 2013.

Reaffirming the international community’s resolve in promoting the rights of all persons with disabilities, HLDMM adopted an outcome document stressing the need to ensure accessibility for and inclusion of persons with disabilities in all aspects of development and of giving them due consideration in the emerging post-2015 UN development agenda.

Among other things, the outcome document underlined the need for “urgent action” by all stakeholders towards adoption and implementation of more ambitious disability-inclusive national development strategies with disability-targeted actions, backed by increased international cooperation and support.

In the HLMDD Series, key focal points on disability from the World Bank, United Nations, JICA and an international NGO discussed highlights of the outcome document of HLMDD and the way forward beyond 2015 from respective perspective.

Sessions:

  1. Ms. Anush Bezhanyan, Sector Manager, Social Protection & Labor, Human Development Network, The World Bank
  2. Ms. Akiko Ito, Chief, Secretariat for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, DESA, United Nations
  3. Ms. Aleksandra Posarac, Country Sector Coordinator, Human Development, The World Bank
  4. Dr. Kenji Kuno, Senior Advisor (Social Welfare), Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)
  5. Ms. Venus Illagan, Secretary General, Rehabilitation International

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Psychological First Aid (PFA): Mutual Support for Resiliency after Crisis

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

Psychological first aid: Guide for field workers
PFA_Field_Guide_E.pdf

Inter-Agency Standing Committee
Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings
IASC_mental_health.pdf

Mental Health Gap Action Programme
mhGAP Intervention Guide
mhGAP_Intervention_Guide_E.pdf

United Nations Expert Group Meeting on Mental Well-being, Disability and Development
Outcome Document
UNU_EGM_MWDD_2013.pdf

The Sphere Project
Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Humanitarian Response
The Sphere Handbook 2011

 






Resources

Psychological first aid: Guide for field workers_E.pdf
IASC_Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings.pdf


Different kinds of crises such as war, natural disasters, accidents, fires and interpersonal violence including sexual and gender-based violence occur in the world. Although every person has strengths and abilities to cope with life challenges, mental health and psychosocial support can be beneficial in some cases.

Cover of PFA Guide
Cover of PFA Field Guide

WHO in collaboration with its partners published “Psychological First Aid: Field Guide” (PFA Field Guide) in 2011 to provide an easy-to-understand guidance on what to do and what not to do when trying to support a fellow human being after going through a serious crisis event. The PFA Field Guide has been endorsed by the UN, UNICEF, UNHCRInternational Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), Plan International, among others, and the UN Secretary General mandated the PFA training for human resources and security personnel in the UN worldwide. The PFA has been widely employed in Japan after the Great East Japan Earthquake.


This training program will promote participants’ understandings on basics of PFA, do’s and don’ts, and self-care technique, through web/VC-based lectures and discussions. The program will provide basic knowledge on how to offer PFA, as well as basics on mental health and psychosocial support after crises which will be an emerging priority in disaster risk management policy making/implementation. The program will be facilitated jointly by the World Bank/TDLC, UNU-IIGH, and the National Institute of Mental Health in Japan, in close partnership with WHO.

 

 

 

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Public Forum:A Society that Cares about Mental and Psychosocial Well-being in Emergency Settings

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center December 12, 2013

Based on its experience from many disasters including the Hanshin-Awaji Great Earthquake and the Great East Japan Earthquake, Japan has rich and unique experience and expertise on mental and psychosocial support in crisis settings.

PFA BookCover
IASC BookCover

The Japanese efforts are consistent with the international community’s consensus to integrate mental well-being into disaster response and disaster risk management. The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) PFA program aims at sharing the Japanese experience together with introducing key global policy/practical tools such as “WHO’s PFA Field Guide” and the “Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings” that are widely used international gold standards in the area.

The Public Forum to be held in the UN House Tokyo, Japan, is open to the general public in Japan to provide an opportunity to learn basics of mental health and psychosocial support in emergency settings, and to share their experience and have dialogues with international and national experts in mental health and psychosocial support in crisis situations.  

Opening Remarks:

Dr. Atsuro Tsutsumi, Coordinator, International Institute for Global Health, United Nations University (UNU)

Welcome Remarks

Dr. Shekhar Saxena, Director, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, World Health Organization (WHO)

Keynote Lecture:

Dr. Leslie Snider, Sr. Programme Advisor & Main Author, WHO PFA Field Guide, War Trauma Foundation

Panelists:

Dr. Leslie Snider, Sr. Programme Advisor, War Trauma Foundation
Dr. Kim Yoshiharu, President, National Information Center of Disaster Mental Health, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan
Dr. Takashi Izutsu, Senior Knowledge Management Officer, TDLC, The World Bank
Dr. Atsuro Tsutsumi, Coordinator, International Institute for Global Health, UNU
Ryo Goto, Communication Officer, Plan Japan

Closing Remarks:

Dr. Kim Yoshiharu, President, National Information Center of Disaster Mental Health, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan

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JSDF: Legal Aid in Jordan

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

Multimedia:
To view videos by the Justice Center for Legal Aid (JCLA), please click below.
(You will be taken to an external, youtube site.)
Justice Center for Legal Aid (JCLA)
The Law Protects You

Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) Application Process and "Enhancing Community-Driven Legal Aid Services" in Jordan

Wednesday, October 30, 5:30pm-8:30pm (JST)

The World Bank Global Partnerships and Trust Fund Operations Department in cooperation with the Tokyo Development Learning Center) and the World Bank Tokyo Office will hold the sixth Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) Dialogue Series: “JSDF Application Process” and “Community-driven Legal Aid in Jordan” on October 30, 2013.

In this two-part session, a Bank staff will first introduce the unique features of the JSDF and its application process and a representative from Save the Children Japan, an implementing organization of a JSDF-funded project in Mongolia, will provide some practical advice related to the JSDF application process. In the second part of the session, the overview of the JSDF project, “Enhancing Community-Driven Legal Aid Services to the Poor” in Jordan, as well as its innovative aspects of its preparation, planning, execution, lessons learned and results to date will be explained.

Despite gradual introduction of reforms, the judiciary bodies and legal services in Jordan are still underdeveloped, particularly as regards services to the poorest communities. The JSDF “Enhancing Community-Driven Legal Aid Services to the Poor” project administered by the World Bank, is supporting legal empowerment of the most vulnerable persons by improving justice sector services, based on the priorities of these poor communities and by allowing them to participate actively in project execution and monitoring.

Legal aid services are an important means to promote greater access to justice for poor persons.  When targeted properly, legal aid ensures that the poor are aware of the rules that affect them, and learn how to hold the legal system accountable for enforcing them. Legal aid also functions as a ‘gateway’ service, allowing beneficiaries to access other services, such as court proceedings, entitlements, social protection benefits, and so forth.  When designed and implemented effectively, legal aid can also play a role in promoting equality and inclusion of poor communities. 

This four-year project is building the capacity of the Justice Center for Legal Aid, the largest legal aid provider in and around Amman, to deliver legal aid services in a more effective and sustainable manner to over 15,000 beneficiaries, increase accessibility to justice and give hope to the poorest communities.

About the Justice Center for Legal Aid (JCLA):

Please click below to view videos by JCLA:
(You will be taken to an external, youtube site.)

Justice Center for Legal Aid (JCLA)
The Law Protects You

Testimonial by a project beneficiary:
“The Justice Center for Legal Aid is the brother, the uncle and the father that stood beside me in my time of need. I will never forget what they did to help.” -Project Beneficiary

About the Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF)

The Government of Japan and the World Bank established JSDF in June 2000, with the goal of providing grants to support community-driven development and poverty reduction projects that empower and directly improve the lives of the poorest and most vulnerable groups not reached by other programs. A unique and valued feature of the JSDF program is that it provides a platform for cooperation with non-governmental agencies and other local stakeholders in the development process. The Government of Japan has support over 300 social development programs and projects, up to the end of June 2013.

Date and Time

Wednesday, October 30, 5:30pm-8:30pm (JST)

Venue

The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center
10F, Fukoku Seimei Bldg. 2-2-2 Uchisaiwai-cho Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0011

Language

English and Japanese (with simultaneous interpretation)

Program


17:30-18:30 The Role of JSDF
18:30-19:00 Background of the Project in Jordan
19:00-20:30 “Enhancing Community-Driven Legal Aid Services to the Poor”

Registration

Advance registration required (first-come-first-served).
Please register online from here.
Please refrain from using the contact form below to register for this session.

Webcasting

There will be a live webcast available for this event. Please note that the webcast will only be available live, during the actual event. (The video of the event will not be archived for public access after the event.)
There is no registration required for viewing the live webcast.
Viewers will need a PC with internet access, Windows Media Player Version 10.0. and PC speakers.
Streaming URL:http://streaming.jointokyo.org

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Final Session: “Learning from Megadisasters”

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

Presentation Materials:

Federica_Ranghieri_presentation.pdf

Mr._Tadao_Hasue_presentation.pdf

Mr.Shingo_Kouchi_presentation.pdf

Mr._Satoru_Mimura_presentation.pdf

Ms._Mariko_Kinai_presentation.pdf

Useful Links:

How can we learn from megadisasters?

Friday, October 18, 2013 (2pm-5pm)

The World Bank and Japan started the project “Learning from Megadisasters” in October 2011. The project aims to share Japan’s knowledge on disaster risk management (DRM) and post disaster reconstruction with countries vulnerable to disasters. The project is collecting and analyzing information, data, and evaluations performed by academic and research institutions, nongovernmental organizations, government agencies, and the private sector. It covers activities of knowledge exchange, fostering cooperation with Japan and the developing countries by utilizing “Knowledge Notes: lessons from the Great East Japan Earthquake” and other products.

The lessons assist capacity building of policy makers and practitioners by disseminating information through study tours, reports, workshops, e-learning, seminars organized through Global Development Learning Network, and Community of Practice (internet-based knowledge sharing site). In this seminar, project outcomes will be reported.

At the seminar participants will discuss:
• How is each organization sharing lessons from the GEJE with the World?
• How can the country utilize these lessons to strengthen DRM?
• How should Japan share the lessons from the GEJE with the world?

Agenda

2:00 pm Opening

Yasusuke Tsukagoshi, Special Representative, Tokyo Office, The World Bank
Ichiro Oishi, Ministry of Finance, Development Institutions Division

2:20 pm Project Report

Frederica Rangheri, Senior Urban Development Specialist, The World Bank Institute

10 minute break

2:50 - 4:50 pm Panel Discussion

Shingo Kouchi, International Recovery Platform
Mariko Kiuchi, World Vision Japan
Kozo Nagami, JICA Tohoku
Tadao Hasue and Kumi Onuma, Development Bank of Japan Inc.
Satoru Mimura, Fukushima University

4:50 pm Closing

Frederica Rangheri

MC: Mikio Ishiwatari, Senior Disaster Risk Management Specialist, WBI

Organizer

The World Bank

Date

Friday, October, 18, 2013

Venue

Tokyo Development Learning Center

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Toward A Global Framework on Disaster Nursing: Lessons Learned from Asian Countries

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WB TDLC and Asia Conference on Emergency Medicine (ACEM) Joint Panel Discussion

October 24, 2013 15:00-17:30

ACEM 2013
Mr. Fathoni presenting during the session.

The Asia Pacific region is one of the most disaster prone regions in the world. The increasing number and diversity of natural and technological disasters pose severe physical and mental health threats resulting in a high number of deaths, injuries, illnesses, health system damage, personal suffering, and high economic costs. On the other hand, disasters, in spite of the adversity and challenges they create, provide openings to transform or strengthen health systems, health policies and programs, and community resilience.

In such disaster situations, various health workers play key roles. Nursing is one of the most important and critical components in disaster health. Nurses often are the first, closest, most accessible and sustainable contacts for affected populations. In addition, nurses often play coordination roles and/or contribute to policy and system development. However, disaster nursing has a tendency of being marginalized in the international discourse despite its importance and impact on health, human rights and poverty alleviation.

ACEM participants
Participants at TDLC.

This panel discussion will provide an overview of the state-of-the-art global frameworks for disaster nursing in the broader context of health system strengthening, and then examine on-the-ground experiences from Japan, India, Indonesia, and Thailand for future policy and program implications. The panelists will discuss about the successes and failures and current gaps in both practical and policy/program arenas, and explore options for better services, collaboration and mutual support in Asia and beyond for the future. During the panel discussion, three countries will be connected via video-conferencing for live interaction among participants in all connecting countries.

Venue:

The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC), Japan

Connecting Sites:

India, Philippines, and Thailand

Panelists:

Kathleen Fritsch, Regional Advisor in Nursing, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, The World Health Organization
Midori Matsuzuki, Executive Officer, Japanese Nursing Association
Yoko Kawatani, Certified Nurse for Emergency Care, Aichi Medical University
T.S. Ravi Kumar, Professor, Head of Emergency Nursing, College of Nursing, Christian Medical College Vellore, India
Mukhamad Fathoni, Faculty of Medicine, University of Brawijaya, Indoesia
Orapan Thosingha, Faculty of Nursing, Mahidol University & Asia Pacific Emergency and Disaster Nursing Network (APEDNN), Thailand

Moderators:

Takashi Izutsu, Senior Knowledge Management Officer, The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center
Mieko Ishii, Associate Professor, Kitasato University

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Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs) Financing and Inclusive Growth

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

Presentation Materials: Seminar 1

Presentation Mr. Eric Duflos.pdf
Presentation Mr. Liu Xiaoqiang.pdf
Presentation Mr. Takatoshi Miura.pdf

Presentation Materials: Seminar 2

Presentation Mr. Jose de Luna Martinez.pdf
Presentation Mr. Liu Xiaoqiang.pdf
Presentation Mr. Dongsoo Kang.pdf

AFDC Distance Learning Seminar Series

Seminar 1: September 11, 12:00-14:00 (JST), 2013
Seminar 2: November 7, 10:30AM-12:30 (JST), 2013*
*Please note that the starting time has changed.

MSMEs are key drivers of economic growth, job creation and inclusive growth. However, access to finance, especially for MSMEs, remains largely limited in most emerging markets. Financing has been a long-time problem for MSMEs, which restrains them from sustainable development in the long run. The World Bank Enterprise Surveys and Investment Climate Surveys consistently note that MSMEs are 30% more likely than large firms to rate financing constraints as a major obstacle to their development and growth. Thus it is a common challenge for all the governments and financial institutions to address the issue of how to provide sufficient financing support, how to expand financing access and how to innovate financing pattern to promote sustainable development for MSMEs.
In order to promote inclusive growth, MSMEs financing, a pressing issue for all nations, especially for developing economies in the Asia-Pacific region, needs to be addressed by joint efforts of the governments, financial institutions and enterprises to enhance innovation in financial systems, products and services, and to improve the sustainable development of MSMEs. 
The Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Center (AFDC) is established by the Chinese government aiming to strengthen institutional capacity building in the areas of finance and development for the developing economies in the Asia-Pacific region. MSMEs financing has been one of the focuses of AFDC’s capacity building programs and a number of training workshops and seminars on this topic has been organized by AFDC in recent years. AFDC wishes to further share related experience on this issue among the developing economies in the region to promote cooperation and inclusive development in the region.

Objective

In order to summarize and share experience on“MSME Financing and Inclusive Growth”, AFDC plans to launch a series of VC seminars in 2013 in collaboration with the World Bank and other GDLN affiliates to tackle the challenges in MSMEs financing to promote the inclusive growth.

Target audience

  • Policy makers from central & local government agencies, especially central banks and other related financial agencies.
  • Representatives from civil society, academia, and private sector.
  • Staff from the financial and development agencies.

Schedule

Seminar 1 September 11

MSMEs Financing for Inclusive Growth: Challenges and Policy Framework

Session 1: 12:05-12:40

The framework and global perspective with Q&A
Mr. Eric Duflos, CGAP Regional Representative for East Asia Pacific

Session 2: 12:40-13:15

China’s experience with Q&A
Mr. Liu Xiaoqiang(Scott), Senior Project Manager, Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Center, MOF

Session 3: 13:15-13:50

Japan’s experience with Q&A
Mr. Takatoshi Miura, Director, Finance Division, Small and Medium Enterprise Agency

Session 4:13:50-14:00

Wrapping up

Seminar 2 November 7

Innovations in MSME Financing: Institutions and Products/Approaches

Welcome Remarks: 10:30-10:35

Moderator Ms. Ting Shu from Shanghai, China

Session 1: 10:35-11:10

The framework and global perspective with Q&A
Speaker Mr. Jose de Luna Martinez, Senior Financial Economist, World Bank

Session 2: 11:10-11:45

China’s experience with Q&A
Speaker Mr. Liu Xiaoqiang, Senior Project Manager, Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Center, MOF, PRC

Session 3: 11:45-12:20

Korea’s experience with Q&A
Mr. Kang Dongsoo, Director/Vice President, Department ofFinancial Policy, Korea Development Institute

Wrap up: 12:20-12:30

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Science and Policy of Climate Change 2013

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

A Blended Distance Learning Course

September 13~December 16, 2013

Cover of SPCC pamphlet

Background

Few issues pose a greater challenge to economic prosperity and human security than climate change. It represents one of the biggest environmental, social and economic threats facing the planet.

This twelve-week, blended learning program has been jointly developed by The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) and the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), in collaboration with the World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC).

The program follows an interdisciplinary approach and is enriched by audio, video, and interactive web-based content. It uses the latest information and communication technology (ICT) tools and techniques and employs a unique format of learning through video conferencing by utilizing the facilities of Global Development Learning Network (GDLN) - an initiative started and developed by the World Bank in 2000.

Objectives

  • Build capacities of individuals and organizations for a better understanding of climate change dynamics;
  • Evolve an interdisciplinary approach towards understanding the various challenges posed by climate change; and
  • Provide participants an opportunity to demonstrate functional knowledge of the core issues of climate change through analysis and diagnosis of real-world problems.

Learning outcomes

After completion of the program, the participants will be able to:

  • Develop a holistic understanding of the climate-change problem, which can potentially affect all dimensions of life (business, society, environment, etc);
  • Acquire technical skills required to address problems with respect to the varied dimensions of climate change;
  • Identify, create, and reflect upon ‘integrated approaches’ and appropriate interventions that may lead to taking necessary action and coping with climate change; and
  • Put theory into practice by
  • Applying science into policy making;
  • Exploring the risks and opportunities for business;
  • Formulating sound strategies for adaptation and mitigation; and
  • Understanding the interface between development and climate change.

Target audience

The program has been customized for:

  • Development practitioners
  • Policy makers
  • Corporate sector
  • Graduates and mid-level professionals

The participants should have:

  • Proficiency in English language; and
  • Strong commitment and subject interest

Program approach

The program will commence with an introductory videoconference session that will provide an overview of the course structure and the core concepts.

The 12-week program will consist of four learning modules spread over three weeks each. The duration of each module will be 20-25 learning hours. The program will be delivered through a blended learning format comprising video-recorded lectures, academic articles and multimedia among others. It will be made available through the Moodle learning management system.

In order to ascertain assimilation, the participants will be evaluated on

  • Participation in activities (20%):
  • Discussion Forum
  • Videoconferences/Webinars
  • Participant Feedback
  • Intermediate tests (30%)
  • Final assignment (50%)

Note: Those who cannot watch live streaming can see the recorded version.

At the end of the program, there will be a concluding videoconference during which a synthesis of the concepts presented throughout the course modules will be provided. The session will also summarize key themes and present the way forward.

Program content


Module 1: Science of climate change: Fundamental concepts related to the science of climate dynamics, natural forcing of the climate system, greenhouse effect, natural and anthropogenic drivers of climate change, methods and tools to detect changes in the climate, modeling, observed changes in the climate and causes behind climate change, scientific evidence of climate change, and so on. 

Module 2: Impacts of climate change: Impacts of climate change on different sectors and regions of the world. 

Module 3: Coping with climate change: Potential to harm societies and ecosystems, in particular, agriculture, forestry, water resources, human health, coastal settlements and natural ecosystems. This module will cover the following topics: 

  • Vulnerability assessment
  • Concept of adaptation
  • Types of adaptation
  • Costs of coping with climate change

Module 4: Action and political economy:

  • Negotiations, including the outcomes of the recent COP18 to the UNFCCC;
  • Climate-change policies such as those promoting low-carbon technologies or lifestyle changes in key mitigation sectors; and
  • Linking the negotiations with public policy, looking back at developments at COP18.

Certification

On successful completion of the program, the participants will be awarded a joint certificate from TERI, IGES and TDLC.

Schedule

Activity Dates
Registration 01 Aug to 31 Aug ‘13
Introductory VC session 13 Sep ‘13
Module 1 (including VC) 18 Sep to 09 Oct ‘13
Module 2 (including VC) 10 Oct to 31 Oct ‘13
Module 3 (including VC) 01 Nov to 21 Nov ‘13
Module 4 (including VC) 22 Nov to 13 Dec ‘13
Concluding VC session 16 Dec ‘13

Registration fees

US$ 250 per participant.
20-40% scholarship may be offered to undergraduate students, unemployed and low income participants.
To apply, contact the program coordinator at SPCC at spcc@esdonline.org

How to Apply

Online registration at: http://www.esdonline.org/spcc/


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JSDF: “Habope” in the Future of Sierra Leone

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Have Hope in the Future: The Rapid Response Growth Poles, a Community-based Livelihood and Food-Support Program

Friday, August 2, 6:00pm-8:00pm (JST)
image image

The World Bank’s Global Partnerships and Trust Fund Operations Department in cooperation with the Tokyo Development Learning Center) and the World Bank Tokyo Office will hold the fifth Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) Dialogue Series on August 2, 2013.

This session will highlight the achievements of one of the JSDF’s projects in Sierra Leone, The Rapid Response Growth Poles: Community-Based Livelihood and Food-Support Program (HABOPE) project by bringing together key stakeholders involved in the project. This seminar will present an overview of the preparation, implementation, and early results, with a strong focus on community driven-development and social accountability as tools to empower whole villages through Cash for Work (CfW) and Food for Work (FfW) mechanisms.

The HABOPE Project, which means “Have Hope” in Creole, is an Emergency Window project funded by JSDF to counteract the negative effects caused by the food, fuel and financial crises. These crises have affected the most vulnerable in Sierra Leone where more than half of the population live below the poverty line with per capita expenditures at approximately US$0.60 per day (2011 estimates).

The implementing agency, the National Commission for Social Action, and the beneficiaries, who will primarily join the session via video conferencing from their respective project location(s), will address the challenges they faced before the project and describe how the project has succeeded in using CfW and FfW methodologies which are not only generating income but improving food security and supporting livelihoods in a sustainable way.

The JSDF emergency project in Sierra Leone has two objectives: (i) to reduce hunger and deprivation in two of the poorest districts: Koinadugu and Tonkolili which were directly affected by the global economic crisis and recent drought and flooding in the Seli River area; and (ii) to restore livelihoods, sustain services, and enhance local capacities through rapid response growth poles activities.

About the Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF)
The Government of Japan and the World Bank established JSDF in June 2000, with the goal of providing grants to support community-driven development and poverty reduction projects that empower and directly improve the lives of the poorest and most vulnerable groups not reached by other programs. A unique and valued feature of the JSDF program is that it provides a platform for cooperation with non-governmental agencies and other local stakeholders in the development process. The Government of Japan has support over 300 social development programs and projects, up to the end of June 2013.

Date and Time

Friday, August 2, 6:00pm-8:00pm (JST)

Venue

The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center
10F, Fukoku Seimei Bldg. 2-2-2 Uchisaiwai-cho Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0011

Language

English and Japanese (with simultaneous interpretation)

Registration

Advance registration required (first-come-first-served).
Please register online from here.
Please refrain from using the contact form below to register for this session.

Webcasting

There will be a live webcast available for this event. Please note that the webcast will only be available live, during the actual event. (The video of the event will not be archived for public access after the event.)
There is no registration required for viewing the live webcast.
Viewers will need a PC with internet access, Windows Media Player Version 10.0. and PC speakers.
Streaming URL:http://streaming.jointokyo.org

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Session 2: Filling the Data Gap with Participatory Mapping for Effective Disaster Preparedness

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Summary
Session_2_Summary.pdf


Presentation Materials

Ms._Kate_Chapman_(Indonesia).pdf
Dr._Agus_Wibowo_(Indonesia).pdf
Dr._Nurwadjedi_(Indonesia).pdf

Disaster Risk Management in East Asia and the Pacific Distance Learning Seminar Series 2013

June 18, 2013 12:00-15:00 (JST)

Background

Indonesia is one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world. Jakarta, a megacity with a population of more than 8.5 million, is frequently affected by flooding. For example, the 2007 floods affected more than a half million inhabitants, and caused more than US$900 million worth of damages and losses. 

Effective disaster risk management (DRM) requires robust data to inform decisions about investments in preparedness and response. However, at the local level, high resolution information is rarely available. By using an OpenStreetMap tools, a pilot project in Indonesia has collected high-resolution data in six provinces including Jakarta to inform flood preparedness and contingency planning led by the local government’s Disaster Management Agency, with the help of the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR), the Australian Aid Agency (AusAid) and the World Bank. The data was used in an impact analysis and in the 2011/2012 Jakarta contingency emergency planning exercise. Going forward, the risk information can be used by decision-makers in preparedness and response, development and investment planning.

Learning Objectives

This session will then demonstrate how participatory mapping has been used by the Government of Indonesia in contingency planning and Damage and Loss Assessment working with the OpenStreetMap (OSM) tools and community, and how the data was integrated into the national database.
  
After attending the session, participants will be able to:

  • Understand new tools for participatory mapping using web GIS technologies, how they work and how they can be used in different DRM projects.
  • How a Government entity can benefits from working with the community to acquire high resolution baseline data, but also raise awareness and build trust with the community.
  • Analyze challenges in the implementation of participatory mapping in DRM projects and how to tackle those challenges.

Agenda and key issues to present and discuss

  • Opening (Introduction of participants and objectives)
  • Presenting OSM tools, sharing experiences on using OSM tools and working with the community to acquire data for disaster preparedness and responses, and sharing experience on how challenges raised by crowdsourcing methodology were tackled.
  • Q&A and general discussion
  • Conclusions

Target Audience

Specific group of people who would benefit from this session are working in DRM in various types of organizations in EAP countries such as:

  • National and sub-national government officials,
  • International and local organizations,
  • Academics,
  • NGOs, civil society groups,
  • Practitioners including World Bank staff and other donor staff in country

Presenters

From Indonesia

Kate Chapman
Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT)
OpenStreetMap (OSM) Tools for Community Participatory Mapping

Dr. Agus Wibowo, Head of Data Division, Center for Data, Information, and Public Relation
National Agency for Disaster Management/BNPB
Practice of Data Collection through Participatory Mapping
 
Dr. Nurwadjedi, Head of Centre for Thematic Mapping and Integration
Information and Geospatial Agency/BIG
One Map Policy:  Integrating local data into national database

 

Moderator

Kristy Van Putten
Spatial Analyst/Data Manager
Australia-Indonesia Facility for Disaster Reduction (AIFDR)

Language

VC Session uses English. (Simultaneous translation can be arranged if it is requested to TDLC in advance.)

Delivery of the program

The session will be a 3-hour interactive session using Video Conference technology.

Live Streaming via Internet will be also available. URL:
http://www.jointokyo.org/en/programs/catalogue/drm2013/

- To view webcasting, participants will need a PC with internet access, Windows Media Player Version 10.0. and PC speakers.
- Webcasting will start 10 minutes before the session.

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9th Microfinance Training of Trainers (MFTOT 9)

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A Blended Distance Learning Course

July-November 2013

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Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) and Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC)  are pleased to announce the 9th delivery of the Microfinance Training of Trainers course (MFTOT9) from July to November 2013.

MFTOT9 is designed to strengthen the institutional capacity of microfinance in the Asia-Pacific region and African region. The course makes high-quality microfinance training accessible to decision-makers, professionals and practitioners in the field of microfinance and increases the number of accredited microfinance trainers in the Asia Pacific region and around the world. Two types of certificate are available for participants who complete the course depending on learning objectives, level of commitment and performance.

*Please note that we are no longer accepting registrations for MFTOT 9. To view the MFTOT9 course website, please check here.

Background

Microfinance is recognized as an effective development intervention that enhances access to financial services by low-income individuals. The Microfinance Training of Trainers (MFTOT) Course was initially jointly sponsored by the Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) and the World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) in 2005. The interactive microfinance distance learning course (MFDL) developed by UNCDF is the core learning material for study. This course has received high rating from participants and become popular in many countries.

Over the past seven years, eight courses were successfully delivered in the Asia-Pacific region and around the world. Over 2,000 participants conducted self-study using the interactive e-Learning package, attended videoconference sessions, received online tutoring for 11 assignments and took part in the final exam. Among them, a total of 893 in 55 countries were accredited to become a fully certified trainer of the UNCDF MFDL course. Top 30 graduates who are located in Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Ghana, India, Japan, Kenya, Lao PDR, Malawi, Mongolia, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, PNG, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Uganda, and Vietnam were engaged to work as tutors for the courses.

Since 2007, the course materials (workbook and interactive CD-ROM) have been translated from English into several local languages such as Chinese, Khmer, Lao, Thai, Vietnamese, Mongolian, and Bahasa Indonesia.

The ADBI and TDLC, joined by a new partner of China Development Bank (CDB) since MFTOT8 to support participants in African countries, are pleased to announce the ninth delivery of the Microfinance Training of Trainers course (MFTOT9) from July to November 2013.

Goals and Objectives

MFTOT9 continues to pursue its goal of strengthening the institutional capacity of microfinance in the Asia-Pacific region and African region by making high-quality microfinance training accessible to more decision-makers, professionals and practitioners in the field of microfinance as well as increasing the number and country coverage of accredited microfinance trainers in the Asia Pacific region and around the world.

Course Content

The course consists of 3 modules and special topics in microfinance.

At the end of Module I (The World of Microfinance), participants will be able to:

  • Describe fundamental concepts in microfinance
  • Design client-focused services
  • Apply effective microcredit methodologies
  • Describe the effects of the local environment on microfinance

At the end of Module II (Financial Analysis), participants will be able to:

  • Read financial statements
  • Measure delinquency
  • Identify key financial factors
  • Identify effective interest rate practices
  • Measure financial viability

At the end of Module III (Institutional Analysis), participants will be able to:

  • Gauge institutional viability
  • Strengthen relations between donors and microfinance institutions

Through interaction with experts during videoconference sessions on Special Topics in microfinance, participants will be able to broaden their understanding of key issues in microfinance.

Course Description

The course features a unique, blended approach consisting of:

  1. Self-paced study using the Microfinance Distance Learning (MFDL) package developed by UNCDF. The package is also available online.
  2. Online tutoring and e-discussion. Tutors will assist participants throughout the course in completing course assignments through grading and feedback. Online discussions will be moderated by the team leader of tutors.
  3. Meeting with international microfinance experts through four 3-hour videoconference sessions at selected GDLN centers. The videoconference sessions will feature presentations and discussions on current issues and best practices in microfinance. The videoconferences will also be webcast live at http://streaming.jointokyo.org/.
  4. Local courses in selected countries will be available during the same time period.

Target Audience

This course is aimed primarily at development practitioners, microfinance professionals, policy makers, donor staff, socially responsible investors, students, and others who want to improve their knowledge of best practices in microfinance.

Participants who wish to develop their skills in delivering microfinance training and become fully certified trainers of the UNCDF course can earn accreditation by completing all weekly assignments and the final examination for this course.

Two Types of Certificate and Accreditation of Trainers

Statistics of previous courses showed that submission of assignments and receiving online tutoring help participants to master the knowledge of best practice of microfinance. Since MFTOT5, submission of assignments to a designated tutor has become mandatory for all participants. Two types of certificate will be available for participants depending on their learning objectives, level of commitment and performance.

Completion Certificate: Those who do not plan to become a certified trainer can earn a course completion certificate by completing the course assignments. They don’t need to take the final exam. Course assignments may be submitted in local language if the local language version of CD-ROM and a country tutor are available. The learning material translation has been undertaken in China, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Mongolia, Thailand and Viet Nam.

Accreditation Certificate: The accreditation is an important element of the course offering, and has great impact on the institutional capacity building for microfinance sector. Course participants can earn this certificate and become a fully certified trainer of the UNCDF MFDL course by completing all assignments and final exam in English with quality up to a standard.

*Certificates will be issued electronically in PDF.

Course Fee

The MFTOT9 courses will be sponsored jointly by ADBI, CDB and TDLC. Participants need to pay a course fee to receive learning materials and online tutoring. The revenue of participants’ fees is used to cover partially the operational costs.

To meet increasing demand to deliver this high quality learning program, we have introduced new participation fee structure since MFTOT7. A full course fee is USD 300. Participants in less developed and middle-income countries will receive financial supports from the course sponsors and organizers.

  • US$50 for participants in least developed countries (“IDA” or “Blend” category in the link)
  • US$150 for participants in middle-income countries (“IBRD” category except for “High-income economies”)
  • US$300 for all the other countries (all the other countries except for above)

Country classifications can be found here.

*Please note that country is based on participant’s residence/location, not his/her nationality.

Requirements of Participation

To successfully complete the course, participants should have:

  • English proficiency. Videoconference sessions and final examination will be conducted in English. For participants who wish to receive the accreditation certificate, English proficiency is crucial.
  • Strong commitment and self-discipline. The course will require between 10-20 hours of self-study per week, depending on the participant’s background in microfinance and language proficiency.
  • Support from employer. To ensure that participants can devote enough time to the course activities, we encourage participants to seek endorsement from their employers.

In addition, participants will need:

  • A computer with 486 processor using Windows 95 or later, a CD-ROM drive, speakers or earphones, monitor of 800x600 resolution and at least 256 colors.
  • An e-mail account

Important Dates for Videoconference

VC#1: July 11 (Thursday), 2013
VC#2: Aug 1 (Thursday), 2013
VC#3: Sep 2 (Monday), 2013
VC#4: Oct 23 (Wednesday), 2013

 

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6th Delivery of Happy Mothers, Happy Children

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Blended Learning Program to Train Nurses and Health Care Specialists in Mongolia

March 28, 2013

imageTokyo Development Learning Center, The World Bank (TDLC), Kitasato University and Mongolia Nurses Association delivered the 6th blended learning program to train nurses and other health care specialists in Mongolia on March 28, 2013.  This full-day program covered mental health nursing, and was delivered to over 500 participants at five sites in Ulaan Bataar in Mongolia.

Venue

    Health Sciences University of Mongolia
    Mongolia Japan Center for Human Resources Development
    Darkhan-Uul Medical College
    Govi-altai Medical College
    Dorno Gob Medical College
    Tokyo Development Learning Center

Related Links

For details on first program, see Mother and Child Healthcare Program Launched in Mongolia.

See Mongolian Nurses Inspire Collaboration to find out how this program was developed.


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The organizers would like to thank Jeeyeon Seo (World Bank Institute) for designing the logo for this program.

 

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Policies for Job Creation

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Presentation file Dr. Jin Feng

Prof._Jin_Feng_(China).pdf

Presentation file Mr. Masahiko Hayashi

Mr._Hayashi_(Japan).pdf

Presentation file Mr. Martin Rama
Mr._Rama_(India).pdf

AFDC Distance Learning Seminar Series 2013

Seminar 1: Thursday, May 9, 2013 11:30-14:00 (JST)
Seminar 2: Monday, June 24, 2013 11:30-14:00 (JST)

Chinese factory workersFactory workers in China. 
Steve Harris/ World Bank

Background

Full employment is one of the most important objectives of a well-functioning macro economy in a country. The current global economic crisis has resulted in high unemployment rate which, if not well dealt with, would affect the social stability and economic development. According to “Global Employment Outlook”, the current global youth unemployment rate is 12.7%, which will maintain an upward trend in the next five years. Therefore, it is a common challenge for all the governments to address the issues of how to create jobs and promote economic prosperity.

There are many policy options to create jobs. In addition to traditional employment creation policy options of increasing labor market flexibility, reforming regulations for employment protection and improving the investment climate, the government can alleviate the unemployment problem through encouraging and strengthening entrepreneurship. Each country may have a unique mix of policies to solve the problem of unemployment. It is very important for developing economies to understand and make employment policies according to the actual situations in their respective countries.

Objective

Participants will learn about policy frameworks for job creation and will have an opportunity to discuss and exchange ideas and experience on the topic.

Target audience

Policy makers from ministries of labor, manpower, education, trade and science and technology, etc.
Representatives from civil society, academia, and private sector.

Seminar Schedule

Seminar 1:
Policies for Labor Market: Overview and Principles
Date: Thursday, May 9, 2013

11:30-12:00 Session 1:The framework and global perspective
12:00-12:30 Session 2: China’s experience
12:30-13:00 Session 3: Japan’s experience
13:00-14:00 Session 4: Interaction and Discussion (Q&A)

Seminar 2:
Nurturing Entrepreneurship: Framework and Approaches
Date: Monday, June 24, 2013

11:30-12:00 Session 1: The framework and global perspective
12:00-12:30 Session 2: China’s experience
12:30-13:00 Session 3: Korea’s experience
13:00-14:00 Session 4: Interaction and Discussion (Q&A)

*Please note: TDLC will not be hosting Seminar 2. We are NOT accepting registrations for this event. 

A live webcast will be available on the day and time of the event.
Please see below.

Speakers

SEMINAR 1:
Date: Thursday, May 9, 2013
China:
Jin FENG, Professor, Head, School of Economics, Fudan University

Japan:
Masahiko HAYASHI, Deputy Director, ILO Office in Japan

The World Bank:
Martin RAMA, World Bank South Asia Region Chief Economist and Lead Author of the 2013 World Development Report

SEMINAR 2:
Date: Monday, June 24, 2013
China

Mr. Wang Yanzhong Director General, Research Center for Labor and Social Security, Chinese Academy of Social Science (CASS);Director General and Professor, Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology of CASS

Co-Sponsors:

The World Bank
Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Center (AFDC)
Tokyo Development Learning Center
KDI School of Public Policy and Management

Registration

Please register for this event by using the form below.
*Please note: TDLC will not be hosting Seminar 2. We are NOT accepting registrations for this event. 

Webcast

A live webcast of Seminar 2 will be available on the day and time of the event from here.
There is no need to register to view the webcast.

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Lessons from the Reconstruction Efforts after the Great East Japan Earthquake:

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Joint Seminar by the ILO-Japan and the World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center

Date: Friday, 15 March 2013  
Time: 15:00~17:00 (JST)

Bikes in Sendai
Debris are collected and sorted before recycling outside an elementary school in Sendai, Japan. Photo: Simone D. McCourtie, World Bank

The massive earthquake that hit Eastern Japan on March 11, 2011 and the subsequent tsunami left devastation in its wake, but it also shed light on many valuable lessons that may contribute to future reconstruction efforts in and outside of Japan.

In June 2012, the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the government of Japan (GoJ) agreed to a new framework for cooperation, the “Framework for Cooperation by ILO/Japan Fund for Dissemination of Employment and Labour Measures for Recovering from the Great East Japan Earthquake as International Public Resources” with the aim of bringing together the expertise of the ILO with the experience and know-how gained by Japan in dealing with the aftermath of the Great East Japan Earthquake. As part of this ongoing effort to compile, analyze, and distribute information on how employment and labour measures can support disaster recovery, experts from Asia will gather in Iwate for an international symposium on March 13-14, 2013, to exchange knowledge and experiences from the recovery process compiled up to this point.

This joint seminar prepared by the ILO Office in Japan and the World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center will focus on the collaborative reconstruction efforts between international organizations and the GoJ by sharing the outcome of the international symposium in Iwate and reporting on the World Bank-GoJ “Learning from Megadisasters” project.

Program:

Presentation 1

“Reconstruction efforts from Natural Disaster and its effects on employment issues” – Outcomes of the ILO/Japan Project and the International Symposium in Iwate
Ms. Shukuko Koyama, CRISIS specialist, ILO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific

Presentation 2

“Japan as One” Work Project
Mr. Toyomu Nakano, Deputy Director, International Affairs Division, Minister’s Secretariat, Ministry of. Health, Labour and Welfare

Presentation 3

Sharing national disaster responses and reconstruction experiences
Speakers from the Philippines, Indonesia, and New Zealand (tbc)

Presentation 4

“Japan-World Bank Knowledge Exchange/Knowledge Sharing Joint Project” focused on labor issues (video recording)
Mr. Mikio Ishiwatari, Senior Disaster Risk Management Specialist, the World Bank

Q&A Session

Date:

Friday, 15 March 2013  

Time:

15:00~17:00

Place:

Tokyo Development Learning Center, World Bank, Fukoku-seimei Bldg. 10F, Uchisaiwai-cho 2-2-2, Tokyo

Language:

English and Japanese

Application:

Please apply by using the contact form below by March 12, 2013

ILO logoWB logo

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KDI-Development Case Study Series 2013: Rural Development Series

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The video of this session can be viewed on the KDI School website. 

Session 3: Reforestation

Date: Wednesday, March 13, 2013
Time: 11:30-14:00

Program Description:

Reforestation can be used to improve the quality of human life by soaking up pollution and dust from the air, rebuilding natural habitats and ecosystems, and mitigating global warming. Forest restoration results in increased absorption of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and harvesting of resources, particularly timber, leading to the sustainable growth.

In order to promote knowledge sharing in the field of reforestation, KDI School organizes this VC seminar in collaboration with the World Bank and other GDLN affiliates. This is the third session of Rural Development Series after the first session on “Rural Community Development” and the second session on “Enhancing Agricultural Productivity” were held in 2012. It is designed to reduce poverty and increase sustainable growth mainly in EAP region and beyond.

During Session 3, reforestation experiences of Korea and the World Bank will be shared with participants. The participants will learn how reforestation could contribute to promoting sustainable and broad-based development, as well as share best practices for reforestation in different countries.

Learning Objective:

Compare and analyze the case study examples to develop appropriate strategies for an effective reforestation policy in your respective country.

Moderator:

Prof. Victor Hsu, Korea Development Institute School of Public Policy and Management (KDI School), Korea

Speakers:

Prof. Kyung Joon Lee, Seoul National University

Mr. Hiroshi Nakata, Technical Advisor to the Director General of Forestry Administration, the Royal Government of Cambodia

Discussant:

Prof. Dong Young Kim, Korea Development Institute School of Public Policy and Management (KDI School), Korea

Organizer:

- Korea Development Institute School of Public Policy and Management (KDI School)
With cooperation of The World Bank

Target audience:

- Government officials, researchers, experts (particularly from EAP and South Asian countries), in the field of rural development and environment
- Participants may be from a wide range of fields (government, private firms, academia, NGO, etc.)

Language:

English

Participants:

30 people (registration will be closed after capacity is reached)

Fee:

Free

Registration:

Advance registration required. Please register by sending us an email or using the form below, indicating your name, organization, telephone number, e-mail address and which session you wish to attend.

About the KDI-Development Case Study Series 2013

The Korea Development Institute School of Public Policy and Management (KDI School) has launched a video conference seminar series in collaboration with the World Bank, Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) and other Global Development Learning Network (GDLN) centers. The series is intended to share Korea’s experiences in the development field and to promote knowledge exchange with other countries in East and South Asia.

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JSDF: Community Monitoring in Burkina Faso

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World Bank Public Seminar "Burkina Faso: Community Monitoring for Better Health and Education Service Delivery"

Date: Thursday, February 28, 2013
Time: 6:00-8:00 pm (JST)

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The World Bank’s Global Partnerships and Trust Fund Operations (CFPTO) Department in cooperation with the Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) and the World Bank Tokyo Office will hold the fourth Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) Dialogue Series on February 28, 2013.

This session will highlight the achievements of one of the JSDF’s projects in Burkina Faso, the Community Monitoring for Better Health and Education Service Delivery (CMP) by bringing together key stakeholders involved in the project. Responding to participants’ requests in previous sessions, this seminar will focus on Monitoring and Evaluation and impact evaluation (IE). It will discuss the results of the baseline survey (household, health facility, primary school, and social capital modules), operational implications the research plan and the design of the IE. The CMP’s implementing agency Institut Superiéur des Sciences de la Population (ISSP) and the beneficiaries, who will primarily join the session via video conferencing from their respective project location(s), will address the challenges they faced before the project and describe how the project has succeeded in improving social accountability at the local level by engaging various stakeholders and integrating elected government officials, NGOs, local committees, and illiterate members of the community in building lasting coalitions among themselves. The community monitoring exercises were designed to include the poorest and most vulnerable groups such as illiterate members of the community and helped them develop the necessary skills to voice their demands and opinions to their local service providers and government officials.

In Burkina Faso, despite successful development outcomes at the macro level in recent years, service delivery at the decentralized level, especially in the social sectors, remains poor. The top-down governance system in Burkina has left little room for robust civil society and community engagements. The World Bank, with funding from JSDF, launched the CMP project aimed at increasing the quantity and quality of health and education services by empowering individuals and communities through capacity-building and coalition-building, increasing transparency and accountability of service providers.

To provide high-quality evidence on project impact through community driven development (CDD) and on the mechanisms through which these are achieved, the CMP includes an experimental IE. The IE will empirically answer four primary research questions. First, what are the impacts of community monitoring on health and education service delivery and on human development outcomes? Second, do these impacts differ across health and education services? Third, how does the level of social capital within communities affect these outcomes? Fourth, does the intervention build informal institutions (social capital)?

About the Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF)

The Government of Japan and the World Bank established JSDF in June 2000, with the goal of providing grants to support community-driven development and poverty reduction projects that empower and directly improve the lives of the poorest and most vulnerable groups not reached by other programs.  A unique and valued feature of the JSDF program is that it provides a platform for cooperation with non-governmental agencies and other local stakeholders in the development process. The Government of Japan has support over 300 social development programs and projects, up to the end of June 2012.

Date and Time

Thursday, February 28, 6:00pm-8:00pm (JST)

Venue

The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC)
10F, Fukoku Seimei Bldg. 2-2-2 Uchisaiwai-cho Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0011

Language:

French and Japanese (with simultaneous interpretation)

Registration:

Advance registration required (first-come-first-served).
Please register online using the contact form below.

Webcasting

There will be a live webcast available for this event. Please note that the webcast will only be available live, during the actual event. (The video of the event will not be archived for public access after the event.)

There is no registration required for viewing the live webcast.
Viewers will need a PC with internet access, Windows Media Player Version 10.0. and PC speakers.
Streaming URL:http://streaming.jointokyo.org

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Policies and Practices for Natural Resource Management

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A Blended Distance Learning Course

14 March – 31 May 2013
NRW

Natural resource management is a key to sustainable development, and it is of interest for all nations. It requires proper understanding of policies and practices for solving problems and issues associated with managing the natural resources to achieve both environmentally and socially sustainable development. The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) and Tokyo Development Learning Center, The World Bank (TDLC), with support from the Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) and Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) are pleased to announce the Blended Distance Learning Course, “Policies and Practices for Natural Resource Management” on 14 March – 31 May 2013.

Background

Natural resource management issues have been at the center of policy debates as well environmental justice movements. Development requires not only better global economic conditions but also a cleaner environment, with sustainable use of natural resources such as land, water, soil, energy and minerals and their security at both the global and national level including availability, affordability and accessibility to all. Natural resource exploitation and economic activities have played a role in fueling many violent conflicts. Trans-boundary environmental and economic cooperation, and transparent natural resource management, can be operationalized to support governance processes and also promote peace.

This twelve week blended learning program will unpack some of key policies and practices related to natural resource management for sustainable development. The program follows an interdisciplinary approach and is enriched by audio, video, and interactive web-based content. It uses the latest information and communication technology (ICT) tools and techniques and also employs a unique format of learning through video conferencing by utilizing the facilities of Global Development Learning Network (GDLN) - an initiative started and developed by the World Bank in 2000.

This program has been developed by The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) in collaboration with the World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC). Global perspective to the course content has been also contributed by the Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) and Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES).

Objectives

• A holistic understanding of the nature and issues in natural resource management;
• Discuss ways for strengthening of regional cooperation and networks (political, technical, civil society etc.) for sustainable natural resource management; and
• Contribute towards efforts at fostering South-South knowledge exchange and encourage collaboration through formal and informal networking with other organizations and partners.

Learning Outcomes

The Broad expected learning outcomes are:
• Ability to demonstrate knowledge and a holistic understanding of policies and practices for natural resource management in the context of sustainable development;
• Knowledge about issues of resource security;
• Apply their knowledge and understanding, and problem-solving abilities, to independently identify basic natural resource problems that affect the development process from multidisciplinary perspectives;
• Identify appropriate interventions and approaches to address multi-faceted challenges of trade and natural resources and their linkages with sustainable development;
• Formulate research questions about the effects of natural resource utilization on development and identify and analyze specific development needs pertaining to sustainable development and natural resource management;
• Be able to apply the learning of policies and practices constructively in their jobs; and
• By the end of the course, each participant will finalize a brief Action Plan outlining the goals, outputs and activities of their individual assignments to promote sustainable natural resource management in their home organizations.

Target Audience

• Policy makers
• Researchers and Development practitioners
• Corporate sector
• University and above level students and mid-level professionals
• Members/staff of NGOs or private companies involved in activities related to natural resource management

Course Approach

The program will commence with an introductory video conference (VC) session that will provide an overview of the course structure and the core concepts. The 10 week program will consist of six leaning modules and will be delivered through a blended learning format comprising video-recorded lectures, academic articles and state-of-the-art multimedia among others. The program will adopt an interdisciplinary approach that aims to draw from the disciplines of economics, politics and law.

In order to ascertain assimilation, the participants will be evaluated on:
• Participation in activities (20%):
-  Discussion Forum
-  Videoconferences
-  Participant Feedback
• Intermediate tests (30 %)
• Final assignment (50%)

On successful completion of the program, the participants will be awarded a certificate from organizers.

Schedule

(Tentative)
Registration: 4 Feb-7 Mar 2013
Introductory VC session: 14 Mar 2013
Module 1 (including VC): 14 Mar-3 Apr 2013
Module 2 (including VC): 4-11 Apr 2013
Module 3 (including VC): 12-21 Apr 2013
Module 4 (including VC): 22 Apr-2 May 2013
Module 5 (including VC): 3-17 May 2013
Module 6 (including VC): 18-27 May 2013
Concluding VC session: 31 May 2013

Course Content

Module 1: Natural resources and sustainable development

• Natural resources: nature and scarcity
• Natural resources and sustainable development: issues and challenges
• Concepts of environmental and natural resource economics, issues of market efficiency, equity issues
• Sustainable natural resource management: use of economic instruments
• Natural resource accounting and valuation
• Models of resource depletion – exhaustible and renewable resources

Module 2: Governance of natural resources

• Resource federalism
-Understanding the role of federal structure in context of natural resource management
-Examples from across the world
-Challenges to the governance of trans-boundary resources
• Local governance institutions for sustainable natural resource management
• Asymmetric information, uncertainty and public disclosure

Module 3: Natural resources, political economy and conflict issues

• Resource curse thesis
• Winners and losers in natural resource development: cases of conflict
• Measures for internalizing the environmental externalities and other social costs created on account of extraction/use of natural resources

Module 4: Innovative mechanisms to address conflict issues

• Tri sector partnerships and building trust
• Funds and foundations
• Stakeholder tool boxes

Module 5: Mechanisms of trade, investment and regional cooperation in natural resources

• Reemergence of the importance of resources in international relations
• International trade and investment in natural resources
• Towards environmentally and socially sustainable investment in natural resource sectors
• Transfer of technology for enhancing resource efficiency
• Designing international agreements and strengthening regional cooperation Interactive session to share the experiences on regional cooperation from different parts of the world

Module 6: Best practices and tools

• Participatory and community based natural resources management
• Planning: Strategic environmental assessment, integrated river basin management, geographic information systems, etc.
• Capacity building and technology transfer
• Awareness raising and communication
• Stakeholder engagement

Prerequisites

To successfully complete the course, participants should have:
• Proficiency in English language; and
• Strong commitment and subject interest

Certification

On successful completion of the course, the participants will be awarded a joint certificate from TERI and TDLC.

Course Fees

US$ 200 per participant.
20-40% scholarship may be offered to undergraduate students, unemployed and low income participants.

To apply, please contact TERI
Energy and Resources Institute (TERI)
Contact: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

How to Apply

Online registration at: http://www.esdonline.org/ppnr (registration open from 4 February to 7 March 2013)

For more information, please contact:

Tokyo Development Learning Center
The World Bank
Fukoku Seimei Bldg. 10F
2-2-2 Uchisaiwai-cho
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0011
Tel: +81-(0)3-3597-1333
Contact TDLC

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JSDF: Access to Justice for the Poor in the Russian Federation

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center Date: December 19, 2012
Time: 15:00-17:00 (JST)

The World Bank’s Global Partnerships and Trust Fund Operations (CFPTO) Department in cooperation with the Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) and the Tokyo Office will hold the Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) Dialogue Series session: “Strengthening Access to Justice for the Poor in the Russian Federation”  on December 19, 2012 15:00pm-17:00pm. This session will highlight the achievements of one of the JSDF’s projects in the Russian Federation by bringing together key stakeholders involved in the project. The session will include an overview of the preparation, planning, lessons learned and results from this innovative project. Beneficiaries, who will primarily join the session via video conferencing from their respective project location(s), will address the challenges they faced before the project and describe how it is bringing justice to Russia’s poorest and most vulnerable groups.

In the Russian Federation today where over 14% of the population still lives in extreme poverty, vulnerable groups such as single-parent families, pensioners, people with disabilities and rural dwellers, are especially at risk, and can suffer violations of their legal rights due to lack of awareness and difficulties in accessing the judicial system. The World Bank, with funding from JSDF launched the project “Strengthening Access to Justice for the Poor in the Russian Federation” in 2009 aimed at improving the accessibility and accountability of the justice system in two of the poorest regions of Russia: Leningradskaya Oblast and Perm Krai. The project is helping identify international best practice examples of legal aid delivery and adapting them to the Russian context.

The Government of Japan and the World Bank established JSDF in June 2000, with the goal of providing grants to support community-driven development and poverty reduction projects that empower and directly improve the lives of the poorest and most vulnerable groups not reached by other programs.  A unique and valued feature of the JSDF program is that it provides a platform for cooperation with non-governmental agencies and other local stakeholders in the development process. The Government of Japan has support over 300 social development programs and projects, up to the end of June 2012.

*Webcast will only be available live, during the actual event. (The video of the event will not be archived for public access after the event.)There is no registration required for viewing the live webcast. Viewers will need a PC with internet access, Windows Media Player Version 10.0. and PC speakers.
Streaming URL:http://streaming.jointokyo.org/viewerportal/vmc/home.do

Language:

English (with simultaneous interpretation to Japanese)

Registration:

Advance registration required (first-come-first-served).
Please register online online form, or by sending us an email to “ptokyo@worldbank.org”, indicating your name, organization, telephone number and e-mail address.

Registration Form
image image

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Session 1: Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (CBDRM) Lessons learned and way forward

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

Related Files

Session 1 Jan. 17, 2013

Summary
Session_1_Summary.pdf

Presentations
Ms. Mayfourth Luneta (Philippines) (PDF)

Dr. Ian Wilderspin (Vietnam) (PDF)

Mr. Pham Doan Khanh (Vietnam) (PDF)

 

Disaster Risk Management in East Asia and the Pacific – 2013 Series

Thursday, January 17, 2013 Time: 16:00-19:00 (JST)

The rural poor are particularly vulnerable to disasters. They are more likely to reside in hazardous locations and in substandard housing. They are less able to deal with the impacts of disasters due to lack of financial, material, and technical resources, social networks etc. Thus effective measures to resist to disasters and recover from their impacts shall be taken to minimize the loss of life, property or assets.

Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (CBDRM) is a well-established methodology for building local resilience that has its roots in the good practices developed over several decades through community-focused development and poverty-reduction programs. A holistic approach is taken to DRM that recognizes the links among vulnerability, poverty and socio-economic development. The CBDRM approach seeks to build on existing community coping mechanisms and adaptation capacities. 

In Vietnam as one of the leading countries on CBDRM, the capacity building approaches under its CBDRM program is combined with structural risk reduction investments both at community and provincial levels. However, as cultures and socio-economic situations are different in each country, methodologies, approaches, and progresses to be adapted are varied. Therefore, it is increasingly important to share experiences and success and to consolidate lessons learned among policy makers and practitioners for further scaling-up of CBDRM implementation.

This session will highlight the various innovative CBDRM practices and tools (i.e. monitoring and evaluation, risk analysis, funding mechanism etc.) to draw lessons in their applications and facilitation of community engagement in disaster risk reduction in Vietnam, the Philippines,  and Indonesia as well as discuss practical ways to apply lessons learned to other countries.

After attending the session, participants will be able to:
i) Deepen understanding on CBDRM approaches focusing on essential tools that shall be required for implementing and scaling up CBDRM programs,
ii) Analyze opportunities and challenges in implementation of CBDRM programs, and
iii) Discuss opportunities for applying lessons learned in contexts of other countries.

Agenda and key issues to present and discuss


• Opening (Introduction of participants and objectives)
• Sharing experiences and lessons learned on various approaches, methodologies, and tools used for implementation of CBDRM program
• Q&A and open discussion
• Conclusions

 

Presenters

From Vietnam

Mr. Pham Doan Khanh
Disaster Management Center (DMC), MARD

Dr. Ian Wilderspin
Technical Specialist (Disaster Risk Management)
United Nations Development Programme

From the Philippines
Ms. Mayfourth Luneta
The Center for Disaster Preparedness Foundation, Inc.

 

Moderator

Dr. Ian Wilderspin
Technical Specialist (Disaster Risk Management)
United Nations Development Programme

 

Language

English

Target Audience

Specific group of people who would benefit from this session are working in CBDRM in various types of organizations in EAP countries such as:
• National and sub-national government officials,
• International and local organizations,
• Academics,
• NGOs, civil society groups,
• Practitioners including World Bank staff and other donor staff in country

Registration

Please send us your name, organization, telephone number and e-mail address by below form or FAX (03-3597-9161).

Webcasting

There will be live-webcasting on the day of the session.  A button allowing access to the live stream of the event will appear on the main program page shortly before the event begins.
To view webcasting, participants will need a PC with internet access, Windows media Player Version 10.0.

Partner

Bank LogoGFDRR Logo

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Disaster Risk Management in East Asia and the Pacific - 2013 Series

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

Related pages

Disaster Risk Management in East Asia and the Pacific - 2010 Series

Disaster Risk Management in East Asia and the Pacific - 2011 Series

January 2013

Introduction

Natural disasters are a main source of risk for the poor, and present a serious obstacle to achieving sustainable social and economic development. Disasters affect the poor most severely; measures taken to manage hazards and reduce their impact provide an effective vehicle to make substantial advances in the fight against poverty. Since 1980, the World Bank has allocated more than US$26 billion for projects related to natural disasters. It is a leader in providing reconstruction assistance, and is working actively to integrate risk reduction into its development strategies and projects so that all development activities contribute to reducing hazard impacts in our client countries.

The year 2011 was the costliest year on record for natural disasters in the East Asia and Pacific (EAP) region – trans-boundary consequences of flooding in Thailand, earthquake and tsunami (and cascading effects) in Japan, floods in Australia and the Philippines, and earthquake in New Zealand – which recorded about US$282 billion in economic losses and affected more than 17 million people (CRED-EMDAT, etc.)

Because natural disasters have a disproportionate impact on the poor, disaster mitigation and management programs are an integral part of poverty alleviation strategies. In this regard, the EAP region is working with clients to shift from post-disaster response to risk reduction and mitigation programs in order to build disaster resilient societies.

About the Distance Learning Seminar Series

As part of the EAP Sector Management Unit Initiatives, which is a program promoting outreach and knowledge-sharing, the East Asia and Pacific Disaster Risk Management (DRM) team, in collaboration with the Global Development Learning Network (GDLN), is supporting Disaster Risk Management Distance Learning Seminar Series for EAP client countries to build capacity and increase knowledge of all professionals who will be involved in DRM activities as well as to help them drive the agenda for DRM activities in their respective countries and empower local partners. This seminar series will highlight the following areas:

  • Disaster risk analysis, preparedness and mitigation
  • Emergency preparedness and early warning systems
  • Community and local level disaster risk management

Within these three areas of focus, this series is comprised of 5 sessions delivered via VC by connecting 5-7 countries in the region starting from January through June 2012. Support for this initiative has been provided by the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR).

Partners

Bank LogoGFDRR Logo

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Health Insurance System

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

KDI-Development Case Study Series 2012

Date: Tuesday, December 4, 2012
Time: 11:30-14:00 (JST)

The role of health care in economic development has received increasing attention in recent years since poor health is a primary cause of impoverishment and bankrupt families. According to WHO in 2000, health-related impoverishment is derived from a lack of risk pooling and proper insurance system.

Health is at the heart of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which recognizes that health is central to the global agenda of reducing poverty as well as an important measure of human well-being. The challenge is to develop health strategies that respond to the diverse and evolving needs of developing countries.


Tran Thi Hoa, 2002

A wave of health insurance initiatives has swept across Africa, Asia, and Latin America and compulsory social health insurance in many developing countries is taken as a popular approach to health care reform. An effective health insurance system is one that not only includes benefits sufficiently, but is also affordable and sustainable over time. Moreover, it must stay within the capacity of health systems so that its implementation and regulation can be assured high quality.

Although the health insurances offered in developed countries are evaluated as successes, there are many unsatisfactory aspects which require improvement. Meanwhile, underdeveloped countries are striving to implement their own health care systems, repeating a process of much trial and error that advanced countries have already experienced.

In this light, this session seeks to portray the experiences of Korea, Japan and the World Bank in the field of health insurance, and to share the implications that can be learned. They are expected to review theories and to analyze how health insurance systems have been designed and implemented at each stage of development. The participants will learn how having an effective health insurance system contributes to promoting sustainable and broad-based development of a country.

Moderator:

  • Philip E. Karp, Lead Specialist, EAP Development Effectiveness (EASDE), World Bank

Speakers:

Target audience:

  • Government officials, researchers, experts , in the field of health
  • Participants may be from a wide range of fields (government, private firms, academia, NGO, etc.)

Participants:

30 people

Fee:

Free

Registration:

Advance registration required (first-come-first-served).

Please register using the form below, indicating your name, organization, telephone number, e-mail address and which session you wish to attend.

Organizer:

Korea Development Institute School of Public Policy and Management (KDI School)

Cooperation:

Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC)

About the KDI-Development Case Study Series 2012:

The Korea Development Institute School of Public Policy and Management (KDI School) has launched a video conference seminar series in collaboration with the World Bank, Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) and other Global Development Learning Network (GDLN) centers. The series is intended to share Korea’s experiences in the development field and to promote knowledge exchange with other countries in East and South Asia.

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Global Labor Market and Youth Employment

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

Joint Seminar by the ILO-Japan and the World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center

Date: November 29, 2012
Time: 18:00-20:00pm (JST)

image
Curt Carnemark,World Bank

While the Euro debt crisis continues to weaken the global economy, the labor market is making limited progress by remaining at a lower level than before the global economic crisis in 2008. Notwithstanding there is a serious youth employment crisis with nearly 7.5 million youth unemployed worldwide.

Youth employment issues were discussed at the World Bank / IMF Annual Meetings which recently took place in Tokyo. As part of a global employment crisis response, member states of ILO also discussed youth employment issues at the 101st session of International Labour Conference in 2012, and a resolution concerning actions to be taken towards youth employment was adopted. 

Taking the opportunity of Mr. José Manuel Salazar-Xirinachs, Executive Director of Employment Sector, ILO’s visit to Japan, and inviting Mr. Keijiro Otsuka, Core Team of “World Development Report 2013: Jobs” and Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, a seminar concerning global employment crisis will take place at Tokyo Development Learning Center, World Bank.

Date :    November 29, 2012

Time :  18:00-20:00 (JST)

Organizers  : 
Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC)
International Labour Organization Office in Japan (ILO)The Japan Association for advancement of ILO Activities

Venue:  Tokyo Development Learning Center, World Bank (Fukoku-seimei Bldg. 10F, Uchisaiwai-cho)

Language:  English and Japanese (simultaneous interpretation is provided.)

Program

Opening remark

Mr. Tomoyuki Naito, Manager, Tokyo Development Learning Center

Keynote Speech 1

Mr. José Manuel Salazar-Xirinachs, Executive Director of Employment Sector, ILO

Keynote Speech 2

Mr. Keijiro Otsuka, Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies

Open Discussion, Discussion and comments by keynote speakers

 

Q&A from floor and satellite meeting places

Closing remark

      Ms. Keiko Kamioka, Director, ILO Office for Japan

(Moderator: Mr. Shinichi Hasegawa, Executive Director, The Japan Association for Advancement of ILO Activities)     

Fee : Free  

Registration
Advance registration required (first-come-first-served).

Please register by sending us an email or using the form below, indicating your name, organization, telephone number, e-mail address.

Contact Form







Governing the Remote: Green Growth in Offshore Resources

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

Related program

GDLN series on a Green Economy in a Blue World Session 3

Date: Friday, November 30, 2012
Time: 11:00-14:00 (JST) 

Session 3 in the series will focus on offshore marine resources, primarily seabed mineral deposits and fisheries. As technology improves, opportunities for resource harvesting and rents to countries increase, along with social and environmental risks associated with extraction and benefit distribution. Fishing and mineral extraction both present potential sources of sustainable growth for coastal economies. However, managing these offshore resources also poses tremendous governance, environmental, technical and social–economic challenges.

image

Regulating the harvest of offshore and deep sea resources is difficult to enforce due to the remoteness and extreme conditions, and the reality that Government and industries often rely on a great diversity of operators to extract these resources. Oversight is weak and the precautionary principle is often not incorporated into resource planning and management. The social and environmental impacts of weak enforcement and insufficient planning on the one hand, versus the benefits of tapping into new sources of wealth on the other, create unresolved tensions.

Using examples of innovative initiatives, in particular from the Pacific Islands countries, delivered by experienced professionals in an interactive setting, this session will seek to address these issues by answering the following questions:

  • What are some of the most promising opportunities for equitable and sustainable marine resource use?
  • What are the regulatory frameworks that provide the optimal environments for effective governance?
  • What is the role of the World Bank in helping its clients realize these objectives

Agenda:

  1. Offshore Fisheries

  2.  

  3. Offshore Mining

    • Mr. James Otto Legal, Economic, and Policy Advisor-Mining, World Bank
    • Dr. Yannick Beaudoin Geologist, Head of Marine Division, GRID-Arendal
    • Mr. Akuila Tawake Aggregate Geologist, Project Lead for EU / SPOPAC Deep-see Mining, Regulatory Framework, Secretariat for the Pacific Community Applied, Geoscience and Technology Division

Moderators:

  • Christophe Crepin, Practice Leader, Environment & Natural Resources, East Asia and Pacific, World Bank
  • Marea Hatziolos Senior Coastal and Marine Specialist East Asia and Pacific, World Bank
  • Bryan Land Extractive Industries Practice Leader, World Bank
  • Philip Karp Advisor, Development Effectiveness Unit, East Asia and Pacific, World Bank

Target Audience:

  • National and local government officials in environment, energy and mining, ficheries, finance, and planning ministries and
  • agencies.
  • Officials from relevant regional organizations.
  • Other partners and stakeholders such as academics, private sector, practitioners, etc.
  • World Bank staff and other donor staff in country offices.

Delivery of the program:

The session will be a 3 hour interactive session using Video Conference technology.
Webcasting (Live Streaming via Internet) will be available.

  • Webcasting will start 10 minutes before the session.
  • To view webcasting, a PC with internet access, Windows Media Player Version 10.0. and PC speakers are necessary.

Language

English

Registration:

Advance registration required (first-come-first-served).
Please register by sending us an email or using the form below, indicating your name, organization, telephone number, e-mail address.

image

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Financing Growth: Improving the Investment Environment through Infrastructure Development

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

Seminar 3: Infrastructure Development and Financing

Date: Tuesday, October 23, 2012
Time: 10:30-13:30 (JST)

image
Dr. Li Chen, Shanghai Finance Bureau

A good investment environment plays a very important role in a country’s development strategy. When a country starts to grow, many aspects of the investment environment should be taken into account, and infrastructure is one that comes on top. Yet many developing countries in the region face a challenge to build and promote their infrastructure. As indicated by economic theories and practice, shortage of capital has always been a major impediment to growth and development. Therefore, financing of infrastructure development has become an urgent issue for these countries to deal with.

Ever since China started to reform and open up in the late 1970s, the Chinese government has paid considerable attention to financing and building the domestic infrastructure to improve its investment environment. As a result, China has been a very attractive place for investment and this has helped to achieve its rapid growth over the past three decades. Many other emerging economies in the region have also been very successful in this regard.

Against this backdrop, The Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Center (AFDC) in collaboration with the World Bank, Korea Development Institute School of Public Policy and Management (KDI School), Institute of Financial Training – Vietnam Ministry of Finance and Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) will jointly launch this GDLN-AP Distance Learning Seminar to serve as a platform for experts and government officials to exchange views and experience with the participants on how to improve the investment environment through infrastructure development, and by doing so, to form scientific policy recommendations in this regard.

Program Description:

Seminar 3:  Infrastructure Development and Financing

Date: Tuesday, October 23, 2012
Time: 10:30 – 13:30 (JST)

The framework and global perspective
- Ms. Natasha Beschorner, Senior ICT Policy Specialist, Global ICT Department, The World Bank, Australia

Experience sharing
- Dr. Nguyen Ngoc Hai, Deputy Director of the Department of Planning and Finance, Ministry of Information and Communications, Vietnam

- Mr. Yoichi Iida, Director for International Research and Policy Coordination,
Telecommunications Bureau, Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, Japan

- Prof. Stanley Paul Sakai, Professor, KDI School of Public Policy and Management, Korea

- Dr. Li Chen, Deputy Director of Urban Economic Development Division, Shanghai Municipal Finance Bureau, China

Seminar 2: Transport Infrastructure Development and Financing

Date: Thursday, June 14, 2012
Time: 10:30 – 13:30 (JST)

The framework and global perspective
- Mr. Mustapha Benmaamar, Senior Transport Economist, Indonesia Sustainable Development Unit, The World Bank, Indonesia

Experience sharing
- Prof. Byungho Oh, KDI School of Public Policy and Management, Korea

- Mr. Koichi Miyake, Counselor of Overseas Transport Project, International Affairs Office, Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT), Japan

- Dr. Li Chen, Deputy Director of Urban Economic Development Division, Shanghai Municipal Finance Bureau, China

- Dr.Pham Duc Hong, Director General of Department of Investment, Ministry of Finance, Vietnam

Q&A session

Seminar 1: Urban Infrastructure Development and Financing (Completed)

The framework and global perspective
- Mr. Kamran M. Khan, Program Director, The World Bank–Singapore Urban Hub,

Experience sharing
- Prof. Byungho Oh, KDI School of Public Policy and Management, Korea

- Mr. Liu Hanyong, Director of International Division, Shanghai Municipal Finance Bureau, China

- Prof. Do Duc Minh, Director General, Institute of Financial Training, Ministry of Finance, Vietnam

Organizer:

- The Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Center (AFDC)
- Global Development Learning Network (GDLN) – Shanghai Distance Learning Center

Cooperation:

- The World Bank
- Korea Development Institute School of Public Policy and Management (KDI School)
- Institute of Financial Training – Vietnam Ministry of Finance
- Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC)

Language:

English

Target Audience:

- Policy makers from central & local government agencies
- Representatives from civil society, academia, and private sector
- Staff from the development agencies

Fee:

Free  

Registration:

Advance registration required (first-come-first-served).

Please register by sending us an email or using the form below, indicating your name, organization, telephone number, e-mail address.

  image image

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Seminar on Sharing Lessons from Great East Japan Earthquake

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

To learn more about the program, visit the program page on the World Bank website.

How can lessons from Tohoku be shared with the world

Date: Sunday, October 14, 2012
Time: 13:00-16:00 (JST)

Learning from Megadisasters, a knowledge-sharing project sponsored by the World Bank and the Government of Japan, is collecting and analyzing information, data, and evaluations performed by academic and research institutions, nongovernmental organizations, government agencies, and the private sector—all with the objective of sharing Japan’s knowledge on DRM and post-disaster reconstruction with countries vulnerable to disasters.

Other countries can protect themselves from major disasters by adopting—and adapting as necessary—some of the measures taken by Japan, and by understanding the strengths and weaknesses of Japan’s response to the GEJE. To help them do that, the Learning from Megadisasters initiative will provide data, analysis, and insight in printed and Web-based formats (including e-learning), in face-to-face activities, and through a dedicated community of practice—all designed to build the capacities of government decision makers and other stakeholders in developing countries. A searchable set of online materials at various levels of depth and detail will serve as a focal point for this community of learning and practice on DRM. The knowledge base will grow as practitioners from around the world contribute their insights and expertise.

The first phase of the project delivered a set of 32 “Knowledge Notes”. The notes analyze and synthesize what worked, what did not, and why in the response to the March 11, 2011, earthquake and tsunami, offering recommendations for developing countries that face similar risks and vulnerabilities and providing a basis for future exchanges with experts and practitioners.

Topics to be discussed at the seminar will include:
(1) Introduction of key messages and lessons from GEJE in Knowledge Notes (KNs)  “Learning from Megadisasters”

(2) Examination on how to collaborate with organizations in Japan to share these lessons with practitioners in developing countries, and

(3) Proposal for supporting developing countries to mainstream DRM in their development by utilizing lessons from GEJE.

Seminar Agenda

Opening remarks

- Mr. Sanjay Pradhan, Vice President, The World Bank

- Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport & Tourism (MLIT) (TBC)

- Mr. Hideaki Domichi, Senior Vice President, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)

- Mr. Nobumitsu Hayashi, President, Policy Research Institute, Ministry of Finance, The Government of Japan

Key note speech

- Prof. Masahisa Fujita, Director, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry
“Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Management in Developing Countries: The Lessons from the Great East Japan Earthquake”

- Ms. Federica Ranghieri, The World Bank 
“Introduction of key messages and lessons from GEJE in KNs”

Panel Discussion (in alphabetical order)

- Mr. Masami Fuwa, Director General, Global Environment Department, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)

- Mr. Francis Ghesquiere, Manager, Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR), The World Bank

- Mr. Fatchul Hadi Secretary General, National Board for Disaster Management (BNPB), The Government of Indonesia (TBC)

- Mr. Koji Ikeuchi, Director, Planning Division, Water and Disaster Management Bureau, Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport & Tourism (MLIT), The Government of Japan

- Mr. Yukimoto Ito, Vice Mayor, Sendai city, Japan

- Mr. Keiko Kiyama, Co-chair, Japan Platform / Secretary General, JEN

- Mr. Vinod Thomas, Director General, Independent Evaluation Department, Asian Development Bank (ADB)

Facilitator:Mr. Kenzo Hiroki, Principal, International Center for Water Hazard and Risk Management (ICHARM)

Closing Remarks

- Mr. Akihiko Nishio, Director, Strategy and Operations, South Asia Region, The World Bank

MC:Mr. Mikio Ishiwatari, Senior Disaster Risk Management Specialist, The World Bank

Venue

4th floor, Iino Conference Center (Room A), Tokyo

Organizer

- The World Bank
- Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport & Tourism (MLIT)
- Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)

Target audience

Practitioners and researchers

Language

Japanese and English (Simultaneous interpretation)

Participants

100

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Visualizing your city in 2025

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

World Bank Workshop

Date: Thursday, August 23 Time: 14:30 – 17:30
Date: Saturday, August 25 Time: 9:30 – 12:00

2025
The World Bank

The World Bank has initiated a special study to develop a forward-looking action plan for transformation to fill the role of a “green bank”. This workshop will reflect the possible future direction for the World Bank in terms of sustainable, green economic development. Over the past 20 years the World Bank has emerged as a global leader and advisor to developing countries on sustainable development. Most recently, the Bank is exploring how it can assist countries to transform to a green economy where the growth of income and jobs, and the reduction of poverty and inequity, are driven by targeted environmental and social investments. Against this backdrop, and in the context of the Rio+20 dialogue, it is timely to also assess the longer term implications of development and environmental sustainability on the work of the World Bank and other international agencies using Official Development Assistance (ODA). The study team considers it essential that this analysis adequately and effectively takes into consideration the youth perspective.

The objective of the workshop will be to gather a variety of inputs on the study questions from the perspectives of those working and making decisions in the world of 2025. We hope to really hear from the participants themselves about their own vision for their city and for cities of the future (hopes), what they expect of their city and cities of the future, and what actions they can take to achieve this vision - as well as what actions can (or can NOT) be taken by foreign development assistance organizations.

Date and Time

Date: Thursday, August 23 Time: 14:30 – 17:30 (mainly university/ graduate school students)
Date: Saturday, August 25 Time: 9:30 – 12:00 (mainly young professionals)

Target audience

University students, graduate school students and professionals under 35 years old (especially with strong interest in future city and urban development and environment policy)

Language

English

Participants

20 people (registration will be closed after capacity is reached)

Registration

Please register by filling this form. If you have any specific agenda or questions that you would like to be discussed during the session please indicate in ‘Other request’ section. If you would like to participate in the Saturday, August 25th session, please indicate in ‘Other request’ section.

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CSR Practices & Knowledge sharing between Japan and India

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

Videoconference Seminar

Date: Friday, August 3, 2012
Time: 14:00-16:30 (Japan)
10:30-13:00 (India)

Ministry of Corporate Affairs, Government of India

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activities have been playing essential roles in addressing the development needs of nations and in promoting social inclusion, particularly in developing economies. In India, US$7.5 billion was spent by private companies for the year 2009-2010 and US$700 million by public-sector enterprises for CSR activities.

The World Bank is currently assisting the Ministry of Corporate Affairs (MCA), Government of India, via IICA (Indian Institute of Corporate Affairs) – under the MCA- through technical assistance to structure its CSR work through advocacy, research, and capacity building. The Bank has also been working closely with the IICA in structuring the National Foundation for CSR that is the model body for CSR work in India. It helps channelize CSR efforts towards attaining the Millennium Development Goals in a socially responsible manner. As a part of the efforts, the World Bank is providing the MCA with access to international best practices, including institutional frameworks with transparent guidelines and effective monitoring mechanisms. After the first video conference on CSR held through Global Development Learning Network (GDLN) in December 2011, a strong demand for learning international best practices in CSR has emerged among CSR stakeholders in India, especially with regards to various approaches to engage with local community, CSOs and local government, CSR promotion, integrated policy development, stakeholder consultations and capacity development.

In response to this demand, IICA, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), the World Bank and the Global Development Learning Network (GDLN) will jointly organize a video conference-based seminar to exchange practice and knowledge on CSR in India and Japan.

Through attending this seminar, participants will be able to

• Understand CSR development and challenges in India and Japan (actors, policies to enhance CSR, collaboration with NGOS, and other stakeholders, etc)
• Obtain practical lessons on CSR activities from actual cases from India and Japan
• Exchange information on markets and players for BOP business for India and Japan

Agenda

Opening Remarks
Roland Lomme, Program Manager, World Bank India

Objectives of the Seminar
Shabnam Sinha, Senior Educational and Institutional Specialist, South Asia Human Development Sector, the World Bank

Keynote Remarks—Setting the Stage—
Overview of CSR in India
Dr. Chatterjee, Director General & CEO, Indian Institute for Corporate Affairs (IICA)

Sharing Japanese Experience
CSR development and challenges in Japan
TBC

Collaboration with NGOs
Ms. Azusa Ibata, Japan NGO Center for International Cooperation (JANIC)

Q & A

Case presentations
Representatives from selected companies in India and Japan (TBC)

Open Discussion and Next Steps
Facilitated by Dr. Chatterjee, Director General & CEO, Indian Institute for Corporate Affairs (IICA)

Closing Remarks
Shabnam Sinha, Senior Educational and Institutional Specialist, South Asia Human Development Sector, the World Bank

Moderator
Shabnam Sinha, Senior Educational and Institutional Specialist, South Asia Human Development Sector, the World Bank

Target Audience

- Companies planning for business development (or currently operating) in India
- Companies exploring feasibility for BOP Business entry
- NGOs and CSOs exploring partnerships

Language

English (Simultaneous interpretation available in Japan)

Registration information

Please submit your confirmation of participation to the designated local contact person in India or using the form below for Japan, and specify a city site (either Delhi or Tokyo) you wish to participate from.

Registration Deadline: July 31, 2012

Contacts

Tokyo

Please register by sending us an email at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or using the form below, indicating your name, organization, telephone number and e-mail address.

New Delhi

Ms. Saori Imaizumi
Education, Human Development
South Asia Region, The World Bank
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Seminar Locations

Tokyo: Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC), The World Bank

New Delhi: The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI)
Darbari Seth Block, IHC Complex, Lodhi Road, New Delhi - 110 003, INDIA
Tel: (+91 11) 2468 2100 and 2468 2111
Fax: (+91 11) 2468 2144 and 2468 2145
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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Human Resource Development

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Session Materials

Session 1:

Session 2:

KDI-Development Case Study Series 2012

Session 2: Capacity Building of Government Officials (completed)
Date: Thursday, October 18, 2012
Time: 11:30-14:00 (JST)

Session 1: Vocational Training and Economic Development (Completed)
Date: Thursday, July 19, 2012
Time: 11:30-14:00 (JST)

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Gerhard Jörén, The World Bank

Education is central to development. It is a powerful equalizer, opening doors for all people to lift themselves out of illiteracy which is one of the most prominent predictors of poverty. In particular, competency enhancement education and training for government officials is especially important. As the autonomous authority of local governments gets stronger, the skills required are changing. The demand is increasing due to the expanding duty and skills required to meet internal and external needs for capacity development.

In general, the objective of training government officials is to increase their knowledge & skills and to increase their motivation to perform. Governments often require officials to take essential training programs that are specifically developed to improve their ethics as government officials. They may also establish certain incentive mechanisms to meet the need for career development of its staff.

By attending this learning series, participants will learn how training and education for public officials contribute to promoting sustainable and broad-based development of a country. It is expected that lessons will be drawn from case studies and recommendations will be suggested for partner countries, corresponding to their situation.

This program welcomes anyone who has an interest in this topic.

Program Description:

Session 2: Capacity Building of Government Officials

The objective is to highlight the importance of human resource development in general and public official training in particular for sustainable economic growth, through the best practices of different countries. To do this, three different cases of neighboring countries in capacity building for government officials will be introduced. They are expected to review theories and to analyze how education and training programs have contributed to enhancing state capacity at each stage of development.

Moderator:
Victor Hsu, Korea Development Institute School of Public Policy and Management (KDI School), Korea

Speakers:
- Prof. Chang Yong Choi, Korea Development Institute School of Public Policy and Management (KDI School), Korea

- Ms. Yukari Wada, Director, Training and Development Policy Division, National Personnel Authority, Japan

- Ms. Josefina Esguerra, World bank Governance Specialist, Philippines Country Office

Target audience

- Government officials, researchers, experts (particularly from EAP and South Asian countries), in the field of human resource development, education, and vocational training.
- Participants may be from a wide range of fields (government, private firms, academia, NGO, etc.)

Language:

English

Participants:

20 people

Fee:

Free

Registration:

Advance registration required (first-come-first-served).
Please register by sending us an email or using the form below, indicating your name, organization, telephone number, e-mail address and which session you wish to attend.

Session 1: Vocational Training and Economic Development (Completed)

‘Vocational Training’ may be defined as a process to acquire and sharpen capabilities to perform various functions associated with employment or successfully carrying out tasks in the workplace. Vocational training, not only plays a vital role in individual, organizational and overall national economic growth, but also is an integral part of human resource development in Asia and Pacific countries. This session will compare and analyze the case study examples to develop appropriate strategies for successful vocational training and economic development in your respective country.

Moderator:
Victor Hsu, Korea Development Institute School of Public Policy and Management (KDI School), Korea

Speakers:
- Dr. Xiaoyan Liang, The World Bank

- Prof. Paik Sung Joon, Korea Development Institute School of Public Policy and Management (KDI School), Korea

- Dr. Kenta Goto, Associate Professor, Kansai University, Japan

Organizer:

- Korea Development Institute School of Public Policy and Management (KDI School)

Cooperation:

- The World Bank
- Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC)

About the KDI-Development Case Study Series 2012

The Korea Development Institute School of Public Policy and Management (KDI School) has launched a video conference seminar series in collaboration with the World Bank, Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) and other Global Development Learning Network (GDLN) centers. The series is intended to share Korea’s experiences in the development field and to promote knowledge exchange with other countries in East and South Asia.

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JSDF: Urban Partnerships for Sustainable Upliftment, Renewal, Governance and Empowerment Project

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World Bank Public Seminar

Date: Tuesday, July 10
Time: 16:00-17:30 (JST)

The World Bank’s Global Partnerships and Trust Fund Operations (CFPTO) Department, Tokyo Office and Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) will hold a public seminar “Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF): an innovative approach to assist vulnerable groups- report from the Philippines”.

UPSURGE
JSDF

This seminar will highlight one JSDF-funded program “Urban Partnerships for Sustainable Upliftment, Renewal, Governance and Empowerment Project (UPSURGE)” in the Philippines by bringing in key stakeholders of the project via video conferencing, and will present an overview of the preparation, planning, M&E, lessons learned and results etc.  There will be presentations from the beneficiaries themselves.

The UPSURGE aimed to institutionalize in local government units (LGUs) a viable model of civil society-local government-community partnership in addressing the shelter needs, improve the physical and environmental conditions, uplift social well-being, and enhance economic opportunities of urban poor communities. This project targeted to pursue the principles of: (a) partnership among NGOs, LGUs and communities in the design and implementation of community upgrading projects ; (b) cost recovery which is possible, even in poor communities; and (c) competition in procurement even for small scale, community infrastructure can provide the best value for money.  The UPSURGE promoted scaled-up implementation of slum upgrading projects by LGUs through the introduction and institutionalization of the LGU-NGO-community partnership model in greater number of LGUs.

The Government of Japan and the World Bank established Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) in June 2000, with a goal of providing grants in support of community-driven development and poverty reduction projects that empower and directly improve the lives of the poorest and most vulnerable groups not reached by other programs.  A unique and valued feature of the JSDF program is that it provides a platform for cooperation with NGOs and other local stakeholders in the development process. The Government of Japan had contributed US$680 million to the program including pledges, and had approved 290 grants totaling US$534 million, up to the end of September 2011. 

*Webcasting (Live Streaming via Internet) will be also available. To view webcasting, participants will need a PC with internet access, Windows Media Player Version 10.0. and PC speakers.

Streaming URL: http://streaming.jointokyo.org/viewerportal/vmc/home.do

Program

Opening Remarks

- Mr. Kazushige Taniguchi, Special Representative, The World Bank

- Ministry of Finance, Government of Japan

- Mr. Michael Koch, Director, Financial Management (CFPFM) in CFPVP

Brief Introduction of the UPSURGE project

- Mr. Christopher T. Pablo, Senior Urban Development Specialist, The World Bank

- Speakers from PHILSSA and FDA (NGOs)

- Comments from Beneficiaries

- Q&A

Monitoring and Evaluation

- Speakers from PHILSSA, FDA (NGOs), and Beneficiaries

-Q&A

Challenges & Lessons Learned

- Mr. Christopher T. Pablo, Senior Urban Development Specialist, The World Bank

Closing Remarks

- Mr. Kazushige Taniguchi, Special Representative, The World Bank

Language

English (with simultaneous interpretation to Japanese)

Registration

To attend, please send your name, affiliation, contact information via email to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
As seating is limited, registration will be on a first come, first served basis.

Fee

Free

Inquiries

Yukako Hiraki, World Bank Tokyo Office
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: 03-3597-6650

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Greening Growth in Coastal Cities

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Related program

GDLN Series on a Green Economy in a Blue World Session 2

Date: Wednesday, June 20, 2012
Time: 11:00-13:30 (JST)

Many of the world’s great cities, markets and industries have risen along the coast because of access to trade and resources. As much as 40 per cent of the world’s population lives within 100 km of the shore line. Traditional industries like shipping, power generation and manufacturing are often concentrated in coastal areas. Only recently, however, have we started to understand the economic importance of the ecological health of our seas.

The 2nd session of the GDLN Series on a ‘Green Economy in a Blue World’ will focus on the challenges and opportunities faced by coastal cities to reverse cumulative impacts on ocean health. The opportunities derived from a healthy ecosystem include job creation related to value chain development of goods and services (tourism, fisheries, renewable energy, green port and marine transport, minerals and natural products). The session will look at how to stimulate green economic growth, and to restore natural ecosystems which have been polluted by rapid urbanization, and in particular the policies and practices which have proven effective to help coastal cities restore.

Speakers will draw on case-studies from megacities in East Asia and China that are grappling with urban sprawl and coastal pollution and describe the tipping points that have led to massive clean-up efforts.

Key questions by the panel of discussants will include:

- What investments in ocean and coastal management are likely to yield the greatest dividends?
- What are some of the most promising opportunities?
- What is the role of the World Bank in helping its clients realize these?

Agenda:

1. Challenges and Opportunities of Green Economy and Urbanization
2. Discussion/Q&A
3. Country Case 1: Philippines
4. Country Case 2: China
5. Discussion/Q&A

Presenter:

Victor M. Vergara, Urban Sector Leader, East Asia and Pacific, The World Bank
Urbanization and Green Economy: Challenges and Opportunities

Discussants:

Yannick Beaudoin (Head of Marine Program), GRID – Arendal

Case Presentations:

Noel V. Gaerlan, Executive Director, Manila Bay Coordination Office, Philippines Department of Environment and Natural Resources
Philippines - Manila Bay

Prof. Huasheng Hong, Coastal and Ocean Management Institute, Xiamen University
China – Xiamen

Moderators:

- Christophe Crepin, Sector Leader, Environment & Natural Resources, East Asia and Pacific, The World Bank

- Philip Karp, Advisor, Central Operational Service Unit, East Asia and Pacific, The World Bank

Target Audience:

- National and local government officials in environment, fisheries, finance, and planning ministries and agencies. 
- Officials from relevant regional organizations (e.g. ASEAN, PEMSEA)
- Other partners and stakeholders such as academics, private sector, practitioners, civil society organizations in the field of environment and fisheries.
- World Bank staff and other donor staff in country offices.

Language:

English

Delivery of the program:

The session will be a 2.5-hour interactive session using Video Conference technology.

Webcasting (Live Streaming via Internet) will be available. URL: http://streaming.jointokyo.org

- Webcasting will start 10 minutes before the session.
- To view webcasting, a PC with internet access, Windows Media Player Version 10.0. and PC speakers are necessary.

Registration:

Advance registration required (first-come-first-served).
Please register by sending us an email or using the form below, indicating your name, organization, telephone number, e-mail address and which session you wish to attend.

 

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