Programs

Series of Technical Deep Dive (TDD): Smart Cities TDD

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For World Bank Smart Cities Conference, please click here.

Laying the Infrastructure for Competitiveness, Innovation and Engagement

November 14 - 18, 2016
SC Photo1

Urbanization is occurring at an unprecedented pace and it is forecasted that two thirds of the world’s population will be living in urban areas by 2050. Demand for services in urban areas is therefore increasing rapidly, and the capacity of local governments to manage this demand is the key challenge. A Smart City Approach is one solution that requires smart and sustainable strategies in urban planning, managing, and governing so that cities can improve the life of all social classes.

The World Bank’s Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC), in collaboration with the Government of Japan and World Bank Smart City Knowledge Silo Breakers (KSB) will organize a five-day Technical Deep Dive (TDD) on Smart Cites from November 14 – 18, 2016. Practitioners and experts on Smart Cities from around 10 countries are expected to join for this TDD.

TDDs are an innovative approach to knowledge exchange composed of workshops, site visits, peer-peer knowledge sharing and action planning, and aims to foster operational development of World Bank funded projects in specific topics. This TDD strives to reach a deep understanding of what composes a smart city and what it takes to build one. The special emphasis at this TDD is given to innovation, citizen engagement, and economic benefit generation and competitiveness.

 

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Series of Technical Deep Dive (TDD): TDD on Compact but Livable Cities

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News on this TDD:
Japan’s Toyama City and World Bank Sign Memorandum of Understanding on City Partnership Program

October 30 – November 4, 2016
Toyama Photo

Urbanization is occurring at an unprecedented pace and scale in developing world, and as cities expand without proper regulatory framework and planning, living environments will be degraded, GHG emissions will increase, and cities will be increasingly more vulnerable to disasters. Compact city planning tools can help to support and foster economic growth while addressing these concerns.

The World Bank’s Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC), with a collaboration of the Government of Japan will organize a six-day Technical Deep Dive (TDD) on Compact but Livable Cities in Tokyo and Toyama, Japan from October 30 to November 4, 2016. Over 55 participants from 13 countries will gather together to discuss compact cities, explore policy decisions and share examples of successful interventions.

Among countries that experienced rapid urbanization in the history, Japan hosts one of the world’s most advanced policy imperatives on making urban spaces accessible, livable, safe and resilient, and it has successfully demonstrated that life can be comfortable and livable for all, even with high population density. Toyama City, where the site visit of this TDD and Resilience Cities 100 Conference will be held, has been selected as a case study for the model compact city in OECD report on “Compact City Policies: A Comparative Assessment.” It was also selected as one of the strategic partner cities under TDLC’s City Partnership Program (CPP).

Technical Deep Dives (TDD):
TDDs are an innovative approach to knowledge exchange including workshops, site visits, peer-peer knowledge sharing and action planning for clients in developing countries to deepen their knowledge on specific topics. In general, TDDs facilitate structured learning and provides ongoing support to connect to technical experts and best practices in close collaboration with the World Bank’s Communities of Practice (CoP).

 

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World Bank Smart Cities Conference

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Program Details

WBSCC_1117_program.pdf

For news on the conference, please click here.

Laying the Infrastructure for Competitiveness, Innovation and Engagement

October 21, 2016
SC photo

World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) will be hosting a day-long International Conference on Smart Cities.

Demand for services in urban area is increasing rapidly, and the capacity of local governments to manage this demand is the key challenge.

A Smart City Approach boosts citizen engagement, innovation and competitiveness of cities, while ensuring that cities as the core engine of growth meeting the needs of present and future generations in economic, social, and environmental aspects and boosting shared prosperity among all social classes.

EVENT DATE/TIME:

November 17, Thursday, 2016 9:00AM to 5:00PM

LOCATION:

Intercontinental Yokohama Grand, Ball Room

REGISTRATION:

Free of Charge. Early registration is recommended to secure a seat. Please register using the registration form on the World Bank Tokyo Office website by clicking here.
Please refrain from using the contact form at the bottom of this page to register for the event.

PROGRAM:

Session 1: Quality Ingrastructure Investment (QII) and Adaptation of Smart Technologies
Sesson 2: Fostering Innovation Eco-System and Citizen Engagement in Urban Service Delivery
Session 3: Beyond Service Delivery: Triggering Innovation, Competitiveness and Job Creation
Session 4: Becoming Smart Finance City and Generating More Economic Benefit.

Key Note Speech:

Sameer Sharma, Additional Secretary, Ministry of Urban Development, Government of India (TBC)

Speakers/Moderators (in alphabetical order):

Kenwa Chin, Distinguished Engineer, IBM
Toru Hashimoto, Director, International Bureau, City of Yokohama
Toshiyuki Iwama, Executive Technical Advisor, Infrastructure and Peacebuilding Department, JICA
Stefano Negri, Associate Director, World Bank SME Forum & Leading Specialist, World Bank Group
Yumiko Noda, Partner, President- Cities Solution Centre, PwC Advisory LLC
Taisuke Matsuzaki, Manager, Planning and Coordination Bureau, City of Kobe
Barjor Mehta, Lead Urban Specialist, World Bank Group
Megha Mukim, Economist & Author of City Competitiveness and the City Innovation Index, World Bank Group
Nick O’Donnell, Director of Public Policy and Public Affairs, LinkedIn
Chihiro Shimizu, Professor, Real Estate Research Center, Singapore National University
Hyoung Gun Wang, Technical Lead for Smart Cities KSB, World Bank Group

 

 

 

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Knowledge Seminar on Results-Based Financing and Output-Based Aid

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Bringing Development to Communities to Improve Lives and Achieve Measurable Results: Examples from Indonesia, Bangladesh, Kenya

October 19, 2016 16:00-17:30 (JST)

With mounting concerns over the effectiveness of aid, and growing political commitment to increase aid to developing countries, it is critical that the disbursement of funds is linked to the actual delivery of services, or outputs. One way to do this is through Output-Based Aid (OBA), which is a strategy for using explicit performance based funding to deliver basic service - such as water, sanitation, electricity, transport, telecommunications, education, and health care - where policy concerns would justify public funding to complement or replace user fees.  Historically, in both industrial and developing countries, infrastructure service delivery has often involved implicit rather than explicit funding. These implicit funding approaches are poorly targeted and often inefficient.

On the occasion of the visit of Ms. Carmen Nonay, Practice Manager, Partnerships and Resource Mobilization Unit of the Social, Urban, Rural and Resilience Global Practice and Ms. Catherine O’Farrell, Lead Infrastructure Specialist and Head of GPOBA, TDLC is pleased to host a Knowledge Seminar on Results-Based Financing and Output-Based Aid: Bringing Development to Communities to Improve Lives and Achieve Measurable Results: Examples from Indonesia, Bangladesh and Kenya. Clients from Indonesia, Bangladesh and Kenya will be connected via VC.

The Global Partnership on Output-Based Aid (GPOBA) is a global partnership program within World Bank Group (http://www.gpoba.org/). Through a diverse portfolio of projects, GPOBA funds, designs, demonstrates and documents output-based aid approaches (OBA) to improve the delivery of basic services in developing countries. Large development projects too often fail to include the very poor, and GPOBA is dedicated to making sure the poor and marginalized have access to energy, water, health, sanitation, solid waste management, education and telecommunications and other basic services necessary for growth and opportunity.

EVENT DATE/TIME:

19 October 2016   16:00-17:30 (JST)

VENUE:

Tokyo Development Learning Center
World Bank Group Tokyo
10th Floor, Fukoku Seimei Building, 2-2-2 Uchisaiwaicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan
http://wrld.bg/EuR6304B4mv

LANGUAGE:


English and Japanese (with simultaneous interpretation)

DETAILS and REGISTRATION:


Please register using the registration form on the World Bank Tokyo Office website by clicking here
Please refrain from using the contact form at the bottom of this page to register for the event.

CONTACT:

Tokyo Development Learning Center
World Bank Tokyo Office
TEL: 03-3597-1333
Email: jointokyo@worldbank.org

Location Local time:

Tokyo (Japan) - Tokyo Development Learning Center Wednesday, 19 October 2016, 16:00:00
Jakarta (Indonesia) - WB Jakarta Office Wednesday, 19 October 2016, 14:00:00
Nairobi (Kenya) - WB Nairobi Office Wednesday, 19 October 2016, 10:00:00
Dhaka (Bangladesh) - WB Dhaka Office Wednesday, 19 October 2016, 13:00:00

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Four Japanese cities selected for City Partnership Program

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Kitakyushu, Kobe, Toyama, and Yokohama chosen as first participants

Monday, July 4, 2016

WASHINGTON, July 4, 2016 – Japan is home to a number of cities offering world-class and unique “best-practice” experiences and solutions on a variety of development challenge facing cities around the globe. 

As part of an ongoing partnership with the Government of Japan to share development experience through the Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC), the World Bank has introduced a new City Partnership Program, collaborating with selected cities in Japan to conduct joint research, identify good practices, share knowledge and experience, and identify opportunities to link Japanese expertise with project-level engagements in developing countries.

Following an open call for expressions of interest and evaluation by a selection committee comprised of technical specialists from the World Bank and relevant Japanese organizations, the cities (listed in alphabetical order) of Kitakyushu, Kobe, Toyama, and Yokohama have been selected as the first batch of cities for the new program.

For each city, the World Bank and the local government identified a series of thematic experience and solution areas that match the demands of cities in World Bank client countries.  These include the green growth and environmental protection experience of Kitakyushu, Kobe’s experience in managing seismic risk and more recently ICT, Toyama’s experience with compact city development, and Yokohama’s smart city development experience.

“We are very pleased by the exciting range of experiences and solutions that these cities can bring to our clients,” noted Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez, Senior Director of the World Bank’s Social, Urban, and Resilience Global Practice. “Our clients range from officials from small cities and towns to mayors of Mega Cities, and we’re happy that our initial set of partner cities in Japan includes representatives from large metropolitan areas as well as smaller cities whose solutions will resonate with cities of all sizes in other countries.” 

The World Bank will work with relevant agencies and/or knowledge institutions in the selected cities to document practical “how to” experience, producing knowledge notes, case studies, toolkits, good practice guides, videos, etc. These materials will serve as the basis for learning and knowledge sharing activities that bring officials from developing countries (together with World Bank staff) to Japan to learn from the selected cities and to share knowledge through conferences, study tours, peer-to-peer learning workshops, and benchmarking mechanisms. Learning activities will be both face-to-face and virtual, taking advantage of TDLC’s state-of-the art videoconferencing and multimedia facilities, and will include site visits to maximize the learning experience. 

The World Bank will enter discussion with specific collaboration modality with four cities and once the modality is agreed the Bank will sign MoU with the four cities and then plans to collaborate with them both individually and collectively on various knowledge exchange and capacity building activities for developing countries. This will mark the first time the World Bank has formed systematic partnerships with municipal governments in Japan.  Additional cities are expected to be added to the program in future.

Contacts:
In Washington:  Peggy Wilhide Nasir +1 202-473-1323, pwnasir@worldbank.org
In Tokyo: Tomoko Hirai +81-3-3597-6665, thirai@worldbankgroup.org


For more on the World Bank Group’s Social, Urban, Rural, and Resilience Global Practice, visit:
http://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/socialdevelopment
http://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/urbandevelopment

Follow us on Twitter: @WBG_Cities


Friend us on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/worldbank

 

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Third TOD Knowledge Sharing Seminar

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Related Materials

Presentation_1.pdf
Presentation_2.pdf
Presentation_3.pdf
Presentation_4.pdf

"Japan’s History of TOD and Application of Japanese TOD model in Developing Countries"

Tuesday, May 17, 2016
Tokyo 17:30-19:30






 

The World Bank Group Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC), a partnership of the World Bank and Government of Japan, co-hosted with the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) and Ministry of Finance (MOF) its Third TOD Knowledge Sharing Seminar on the “Application of Japanese Transit Oriented Development in Developing Countries” on May 17, 2016. In the opening remarks, Mr Yasusuke Tsukagoshi, Special Representative of the World Bank Tokyo Office mentioned that Japanese TOD is characterized by integrated development of transportation and land use, the close collaboration between public and private entities, and the method of land value capture,. Mr. Tsukagoshi also mentioned how TOD could contribute to the importance of Quality Infrastructure Investment.

“In Japan, everyone uses public transportation- the rich and the poor alike,” mentioned Dr. Akira Koshizawa, Professor Emeritus of University of Hokkaido in his key note speech. “The Great Kanto Earthquake hit in 1923, just when Japan started combating its urban development issues. This ironically enabled full re-development of Japanese cities.”

Japan integrated multiple elements in its re-development strategy including density concentration, diversity for station users, integration for space-saving, connectivity with surroundings, vibrancy and human scale and low carbon. “There are many hints that we can apply Japanese TOD to other countries,” Mr. Wataru Tanaka, Executive Officer and Deputy Head of Project Development Department of Nikken Sekkei LTD continued, “but coordination is critical.” The importance of proper demarcation and coordination in operation and management, and proper allocation of initial and operational costs were pointed out.

Mr. Delmo Manoel Pinho, Deputy Secretary of Transport for the Government of Rio de Janeiro stressed the importance of adopting a TOD philosophy in metropolitan planning and to conduct TOD pilots at stations like the Queimados station. “Smaller scale TOD projects can have a significant impact for the metropolitan region,” he added.

The final presentation during the seminar outlined a new analytical framework, the 3V Framework, designed to enable cities to leverage the unique characteristics of each mass transit station. “Beyond applying TOD to a neighborhood, rapidly developing cities have an opportunity to shape themselves more sustainably by developing the urban space around mass transit stations, but, since each station is unique, a differentiated approach is needed” mentioned Gerald Ollivier, Senior Infrastructure Specialist and TOD Community of Practice (COP) Lead of the World Bank. His presentation illustrated how the 3V framework can maximize the economic value of TOD station areas while adhering to the importance of the balance across three values of node, place and market. Mr. Ollivier also explained overall strategies to be applied in different types of nodes.

Ms. Kazuko Ishigaki, Director for International Negotiation Management of Japan Ministry of Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, in her closing remarks, underlined, “TOD is indeed a joint action of the public sector and private sector. We need to understand the benefits of TOD more deeply and what it brings about to the society.”

 

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Seminar on Land Use Planning & Spatial Development for Smart Growth in African Cities:

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TICAD Seminar Series Event

January 22, 2016 18:30-20:30 (JST)
Spatial Analysis ppt


The World Bank will host a special seminar on Land Use Planning & Spatial Development for Smart Growth on January 22, 2016 from 18:30-20:30 (JST).

While managing the speed and scale of urbanization presents a difficult challenge for city leaders everywhere, it is particularly complex in Africa, where urbanization is taking place at lower income levels than in other parts of the world. This session will highlight the findings of innovative spatial analysis conducted in Africa and the policy actions that can be taken to ensure that urbanization is well managed, and supports sustainable and inclusive growth. This analytical work will inform and guide national and city level policymakers as they think strategically about the opportunities presented by urbanization and tackle the key roadblocks to success.

The findings of this new spatial analysis are already currently being utilized, for example in Nairobi and Accra, the Bank is providing support for improved urban management and service delivery through a series of projects that address urban land use and transport systems, solid waste landfill and collection systems, water supply distribution and wastewater networks and facilities. In Tanzania and Uganda, the Bank is supporting growing secondary cities through multi-city and multi-sector programs that provides support for a wide range of investments to increase productivity, strengthen institutions, and build capacity for better governance, service delivery and accountability.

The seminar will draw on the operational experience of the Bank’s recent engagements, in particular, the analytical work on Spatial Development for African Cities, a project led by Somik Lall, Lead Urban Economist, GSURR.

Supporting Organization:

Japan Citizen’s Network for TICAD

Objective:

The purpose of this program is to share knowledge on the challenges and opportunities of rapid urbanization among African policymakers. This session seeks to develop better understanding of the urbanization process at national and local levels. Recent innovations in the availability of spatial data and developments in analytical and statistical techniques for analyzing these data have made data-based planning feasible at reasonable cost.

Time and Date:

Friday, January 22, 2016 18:30-20:30 (JST)

Venue:

The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center

Language:

Japanese and English (Simultaneous interpretation available)

Speakers/Presenters:

  • Yasusuke Tsukagoshi, Special Representative, WBG (from Tokyo)
  • Ede Jorge Ijjasz-Vasquez, Senior Director, WBG (from Tokyo)
  • Paul Collier - Co-Director, Centre for the Study of African Economies (VC from London)

Discussants:

  • Sumila Gulyani (Panel Moderator) , Lead Urban Specialist, GSURR, WBG (from Tokyo)
  • Somik Lall – Lead Urban Economist, GSURR, WBG (VC from Kampala)
  • Eng. Natty, Director of Municipal Planning of Dar es Salaam (VC from Dar es Salaam)
  • City Official from African countries(VC) (TDB)

Connection Sites:

                                     
Tokyo (Japan) Friday, 22 January 2016, 18:30:00 JST
Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) Friday, 22 January 2016, 12:30:00 EAT
Accra (Ghana) (TBC) Friday, 22 January 2016, 09:30:00 GMT
London (United Kingdom - England)Friday, 22 January 2016, 09:30:00 GMT
Nairobi (Kenya) Friday, 22 January 2016, 12:30:00 EAT
Kigali (Rwanda)Friday, 22 January 2016, 11:30:00 CAT
Kampala (Uganda)Friday, 22 January 2016, 12:30:00 EAT
Dar es Salaam (Tanzania)Friday, 22 January 2016, 12:30:00 EAT
Pretoria (South Africa)Friday, 22 January 2016, 11:30:00

Program:

                                                             
IntroductionsYasusuke Tsukagoshi, Special Representative, WBG
PresentationEde Jorge Ijjasz-Vasquez, Senior Director, WBG
PresentationPaul Collier, Co-Director, Centre for the Study of African Economies
Panel DiscussionSumila Gulyani, Lead Urban Specialist, GSURR, WBG (Panel Moderator)
Somik Lall, Lead Urban Economist, GSURR, WBG
Eng. Natty, Director of Municipal Planning of Dar es Salaam
City Official from African countries(TBD)
Q&A and DiscussionsTokyo audience and participating VC sites
ClosingRepresentative from Japan Citizen’s Network for TICAD

How to Register:

Registration is required to attend this session in person.
Please fill out this form

Webcast:

This session will be webcast live.
The url will be provided here before the event.

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International Conference on Sustainable Development through “Quality Infrastructure Investment”

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Webstreaming

Please visit this link to watch the live webcast.
Sessions 1-3 on Day 1 will be webcast LIVE.

Program Details

ENG_ProgramDetails.pdf

Chair Summary

QII_Chair_Sumary_En.pdf

Full Report

QII_Final_Report_.pdf

January 20-21, 2016

Cars running under highway at night

The World Bank in commemoration of the launch of the Phase III of the Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) partnership will host the first annual International Conference on Sustainable Development through “Quality Infrastructure” on January 20-21, 2016.

Background:

In May 2015, the Government of Japan announced the “Partnership for Quality Infrastructure” to promote cooperation and collaboration with other development partners in the area of quality infrastructure investment. The World Bank Group considers investments in infrastructure development in developing countries as indispensable for achieving its twin goal of eliminating poverty and promoting shared prosperity, and shares Japan’s view that infrastructure investment that incorporates elements of (1) economic efficiency (2) social inclusion (3) safety and resilience (4) environmental sustainability (5) convenience and comfort are vital for sustainable development.

In this international conference, practitioners in infrastructure and urban development from various countries, the World Bank Group, the Government of Japan, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), and other international organizations will participate and share experience on quality infrastructure as below.

Main Discussion Points:

  • Developing a shared understanding of the attributes of a quality infrastructure and the relationship between quality infrastructure and economic growth
  • Deliberating on methods to effectively realize quality infrastructure investment
  •  
  • Promoting understanding of various efforts to promote quality infrastructure
  • In-depth coverage of the dimensions of quality infrastructure including: economic efficiency, social inclusion, safety and resilience, environmental sustainability, and comfort and convenience
  •  

Date:

Wednesday, January 20, 2016
Thursday, January 21, 2016

Venue:

The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center

Organized by:

The World Bank

Co-organized by:

Government of Japan (MOF, MOFA, MLIT)

Webcast

Sessions 1-2 on Wednesday, January 20, 2016 will be webcast live.
Please bookmark this url (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2dOPhkN4Wxc) or visit this page just before the sessions start.

Program*

ENG_ProgramDetails.pdf

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

                                                 
13:30-14:00Session 1Welcome and Objective Setting
14:00-14:50Session 2Keynote Session on Urban Development and Quality Infrastructure**
14:50-15:35Session 3Perspectives on Quality Infrastructure Investment
15:50-16:35Session 4Japanese Perspectives on Quality Infrastructure Investment
16:35-17:50Session 5Regional, Spatial and Jurisdictional Elements of Quality Infrastructure
17:50-18:10Closing
18:10-19:00Reception

 

Thursday, January 21, 2016

                                                       
9:00-9:20Session 1 Opening Session on Operationalizing Quality Infrastructure Dimensions of Economic Efficiency, Inclusiveness, Safety and Resilience, Sustainability, Convenience and Comfort
9:20-10:30Session 2Addressing Economic Efficiency through Quality Infrastructure
10:45-11:45Session 3Addressing Social Inclusion through Quality Infrastructure
11:45-13:00Session 4 Addressing Safety and Resilience through Quality Infrastructure
14:00-15:00Session 5Addressing Environmental Sustainability through Quality Infrastructure
15:10-16:10Session 6Addressing Convenience and Comfort: Livability/Social Urbanism: Stakeholder Led Urban Design to ensure Quality Infrastructure
16:10-17:10Session 7 Capacity Building for Quality Infrastructure
17:10-17:20 Closing


*Please visit our website for the latest details of each session. Session details are subject to change. 

Registration:

Please register using the registration form on the World Bank Tokyo Office website by clicking here.
Please refrain from using the contact form at the bottom of this page to register for the event.

Inquiries:

Please contact the World Bank Tokyo Office (ptokyo@worldbank.org)
TEL: 03-3597-6650

ABOUT THE TOKYO DEVELOPMENT LEARNING CENTER (TDLC)
The Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) serves as a platform for exchange of knowledge and experience on development through partnerships with various public and private organizations in Japan and other countries. The program helps to support the World Bank Group’s knowledge strategy which focuses on becoming a “Solutions Bank” to more effectively support its clients in applying evidence-based solutions to development challenges.  With its unique mix of information and communications technology (ICT) facilities, connectivity, and expertise, coupled with a strong partner network, TDLC is very well placed to deliver knowledge and to support dialogue and consultation on development challenges and solutions with a broad range of stakeholders all across the globe. TDLC is funded by the Government of Japan and managed by the Social, Urban, Rural and Resiliency Global Practice (GSURR) of the World Bank Group.

**Keynote Session: “Urban Development and Quality Infrastructure” by Peter Calthorpe
Peter Calthorpe is owner and founder of Calthorpe Associates, an award-winning firm devoted to sustainable urban design and planning globally. He has been named one of 25 “innovators on the cutting edge” by Newsweek for his work redefining the models of urban revitalization, suburban growth and regional planning in America. His published work includes Sustainable Communities, The Regional City: Planning for the End of Sprawl and Urbanism in the Age of Climate Change. Calthorpe is globally recognized for first introducing the concept of Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) in 1993 in his book, The Next American Metropolis: Ecology, Community, and the American Dream. In this work, he provided extensive guidelines and illustrations of their broad application, paving the way for a new age of planning practices that favor sustainable transit.

QII_Chair_Sumary_En.pdf

QII_Final_Report_.pdf

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Knowledge Sharing Seminars on Transit-Oriented Development (TOD)

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Related Materials

Eco2Cities_E.pdf
Transforming_Cities_with_Transit.pdf
Financing_TOD_with_Land_Values.pdf

Summer 2015 - Present

Bird's eye view of Tokyo
Mitsui Fudosan Co., Ltd.

Cities in developing countries are growing at an unprecedented rate and scale. With rising incomes, cities will expand outward, following the trajectory of automobile-dependent urban development evident in developed countries, where such development is often accompanied by the negative impacts of sprawl such as traffic congestion and air pollution. Transit and land-use integration is one of the most promising means of reversing the negative trends of sprawl and placing cities in developing countries on a sustainable pathway.

Cover of Transforming Cities with Transit
Transforming Cities with Transit

Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) is a major solution in promoting sustainable urban growth and development. Done well, TOD advances economic development, environmental sustainability, and -inclusive social development. The rapid growth of urban areas and increasing investment in urban transportation systems in the developing world presents a unique opportunity of TOD, including possible Land Value Capture to raise funds needed for transit investment.

Cover of Financing TOD with Land Values
Financing TOD with Land Values

The World Bank Group has been accumulating operational and advisory experience in TOD across country programs in Colombia, China, Indonesia, India, Brazil and Vietnam, among others. The Bank has also consolidated emerging global knowledge on TOD by publishing “Transforming Cities with Transit,” and “Financing Transit-Oriented Development with Land Values”.

To undertake TOD, it is imperative that professionals with different disciplines (urban and transport planners, transport engineer, housing experts, financial experts, community development experts, etc.) work together, across institutional and organization boundaries. Cross-GP Community of Practice on Transit-Oriented Development was created to promote the aggregation, exchange, production, and dissemination of Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) knowledge across the WBG as well as the Bank’s client governments and other external partners.

To this end, the World Bank Group and the Japanese Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) will host a series of knowledge sharing seminars and other activities on TOD, where experience and lessons learned from Japan as well as from the World Bank client countries will be introduced and discussed.

Sessions

Session 1:
Sharing Good Practices on Transit-Oriented Development: Cases from the World Bank and Japan     

Session 2:   
Regulatory and Institutional Frameworks for Private-Public Partnership in the Tokyo Station Area

Session 3:
Japan’s History of TOD and Application of Japanese TOD model in Developing Countries   

Related Materials

Eco2Cities_E.pdf
Transforming_Cities_with_Transit.pdf
Financing_TOD_with_Land_Values.pdf

 

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Regulatory and Institutional Frameworks for Private-Public Partnership in the Tokyo Station Area

story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

Related Materials

Presentation_1.pdf
Presentation_2.pdf

Knowledge Sharing Seminar on Transit-Oriented Development (TOD)

Thursday, October 8th, 2015
Tokyo 15:00-17:00






 

 

The WBG Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) in collaboration with the Japanese Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) will host a seminar on sharing good practices on Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) on October 8, 2015 from 15:00-17:00 (JST). 

In this seminar, speakers will introduce how the Tokyo Station area, Japan’s oldest Western-style office district first developed at the turn of the 20th century transformed itself into one of the most economically and socially dynamic, environmentally sustainable, and resilient public places in Japan by focusing on the regulatory and institutional frameworks that were conducive to the success of the redevelopment. Presentations will also highlight the “soft” components of city planning and illustrate that strong public-private collaborations can create shared value for companies, communities, and the environment.

The Tokyo Station area, 120 ha of land surrounding the Tokyo Station comprised by the Otemachi, Marunouchi, Yurakucho districts in Chiyoda Ward houses 4,000 companies, which generate a revenue totaling over 135 trillion yen or about 10% of Japan’s total corporate revenue. It covers 13 stations and 21 railway lines including that of bullet trains that connect Tokyo with other regional cities in Japan. The Tokyo Station area with its proximity to the Imperial Palace, is also a pedestrian-friendly, socially vibrant area where tourists and locals can enjoy its trendy cafes and shops or stroll around to watch street performances. Eco-friendly and aseismic technologies were introduced to the new buildings and infrastructure while preserving some of the historical architectures and city scape. Since 1890, the Tokyo Station Area has been continuously transforming itself and has evolved in to a more economically dynamic, environmentally sustainable and resilient public place that represents Tokyo.

Drawing lessons from the Tokyo Station area redevelopment, panelists will discuss how the experience in the regulatory and institutional frameworks for land development and private-public collaborations can be applied in other contexts, particularly in developing countries.

Event Date:

Thursday, October 8th, 2015

Location

Tokyo Development Learning Center

Joint Organizers:

The World Bank (GSURR/GTIDR/TDLC/ECAJP) and the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT), the Government of Japan (GoJ) 

Supporting Organizations:

World Resources Institute (WRI), CITYNET, JICA JABODETABEK Urban Transportation Policy Integration Project Phase 2 (JUTPI 2) Team

Connecting sites:

Delhi             11:30 - 13:30
Jakarta           13:00 - 15:00
Kolkata           11:30 - 13:30
Singapore         14:00 - 16:00
Surabaya         13:00 - 15:00
Tokyo             15:00 - 17:00

Speakers

Mr. Tatsuo Nishimoto, Deputy General Manager, Urban Coordination Office, Urban Development Promotion Department, Mitsubishi Estate Co., Ltd.
Dr. Miki Yasui, Professor, Department of Community Development, Faculty of Social Policy and Administration, Hosei Univeristy

Moderator:

Daniel Levine 
Senior Officer, CCSA, and Acting Manager of TDLC, The World Bank

How to Participate

Pre-registration is required.
Please register from here.
Please do not use the contact form below to register for this event.

Language

English and Japanese (simultaneous interpretation provided)

Webcast

This session will be webcast live. 
Click here 5-10 mins before the session starts.

Related Materials

Presentation_1.pdf
Presentation_2.pdf

ABOUT THE TOKYO DEVELOPMENT LEARNING CENTER (TDLC)
The Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) serves as a platform for exchange of knowledge and experience on development through partnerships with various public and private organizations in Japan and other countries. The program helps to support the World Bank Group’s knowledge strategy which focuses on becoming a “Solutions Bank” to more effectively support its clients in applying evidence-based solutions to development challenges.  With its unique mix of information and communications technology (ICT) facilities, connectivity, and expertise, coupled with a strong partner network, TDLC is very well placed to deliver knowledge and to support dialogue and consultation on development challenges and solutions with a broad range of stakeholders all across the globe. TDLC is funded by the Government of Japan and managed by the Social, Urban, Rural and Resiliency Global Practice (GSURR) of the World Bank Group.

ABOUT THE WORLD BANK GROUP (WBG)
Established in 1944, the WBG is one of the world’s largest sources of funding and knowledge for development solutions. In fiscal year 2014, the WBG provided $61 billion to developing countries and an estimated 963 loans, grants, equity investments and guarantees to promote economic growth, fight poverty, and assist private enterprise. It is governed by 188 member countries and delivers services out of 120 offices with nearly 15,000 staff located globally. The WBG consists of five specialized institutions: the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD), the International Development Association (IDA), the International Finance Corporation (IFC), the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA), and the International Centre for the Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID). The World Bank is organized into six client-facing Regional Vice-Presidencies, several corporate functions, and is introducing fourteen Global Practices as well as five Cross-Cutting Solution Areas to bring best-in-class knowledge and solutions to regional and country clients.

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City Partnership Program

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TDLC City Partnership Program: Call for Expressions of Interest (EOI)

TDLC_CPP_EOI_EN.pdf

Spring 2016
City Partnership Program image

The World Bank and the Government of Japan have been collaborating since 2004 in execution of the Japan/World Bank Distance Learning Partnership Program which has supported the establishment and operation of the Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC).  Program funds have been used to set up a state-of-the-art learning center in Tokyo which serves as a platform for exchange of knowledge and experience on development through partnerships with various public and private organizations in Japan and the region.

The TDLC program helps to support the World Bank’s knowledge strategy which focuses on becoming a “Solutions Bank” to more effectively support its clients in applying evidence-based solutions to development challenges.  With its unique mix of information and communications technology (ICT) facilities, connectivity, and expertise, coupled with a strong partner network, TDLC is very well placed to deliver knowledge and to support dialogue and consultation on development challenges and solutions with a broad range of stakeholders all across the globe. 

Japan is home to a number of cities that offer world-class and often unique “best-practice” experiences on various development challenge and solution areas. As a significant and important new element of the TDLC Program, a new City Partnerships Program is being introduced. This program will involve engagement with selected cities in Japan for purposes of joint research and knowledge and experience sharing, with a downstream view towards identifying opportunities to link Japanese expertise with specific project-level engagements in developing countries. 

The World Bank will select (in consultation with the Japanese Ministry of Finance) approximately 3-5 cities with which it will collaborate to document experience and lessons through joint research and to deliver a series of knowledge and learning activities designed to share experience around specific development solutions. 
Cities will be selected through an open and transparent competitive process.  The World Bank will work with relevant agencies and/or knowledge institutions in the cities selected to capture and document practical, “how-to” experiences, producing outputs such as knowledge notes, toolkits, good practice guides, videos, etc.  These materials will then be used as the basis for learning and knowledge sharing activities that bring officials from developing countries (sometimes together with World Bank staff) to Japan to learn from the selected cities and to share knowledge through peer-to-peer learning and benchmarking mechanisms such as deep dives, master classes, etc.  Learning activities will be both face-to-face and virtual, and will include site visits to maximize the learning experience.

The World Bank will also explore linkages with its other city partnership initiatives, most notably the Global Lab on Strategic Metropolitan Planning and Management (Metro Lab) program, which serves as a platform for peer-to-peer knowledge sharing, learning and benchmarking among participating cities.  A growing network of cities in World Bank client countries are already part of the Metro Lab program, including Mexico City, Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro (Latin America); Accra, Addis Ababa, Dar es Salaam, and Nairobi (Africa), Ho Chi Minh City, Kathmandu, Karachi, and Mumbai (Asia), together with resource cities from industrialized countries, including Barcelona, New York, Paris, and Seoul.  Each Metro Lab activity addresses issues defined and selected by the host city, with the invited cities offering experience and advice while learning together.  Japanese cities selected for the City Partnership program will be invited to join Metro Lab activities, where appropriate.

The city partnerships will be integrated into the overall TDLC work program in a systematic manner, with TDLC’s technology platform used initially to disseminate knowledge about a given city’s experience, to be followed by study visits and networking to introduce World Bank country clients to individual experts and institutions that can be called upon to support technical assistance and advisory services both for purposes of project identification and eventual implementation. 

Dates of the Campaign: Deadline for submitting EOIs for the first batch of selection will be April 30th, 2016
TDLC_CPP_EOI_EN.pdf

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Toward Sustainable and Inclusive City Development

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New City Partnership Program

Wednesday, July 1, 4:30pm-6:00pm
image of cityscape

Introduction

The World Bank Group (WBG) and the Government of Japan have been collaborating since 2004 in delivering knowledge, learning and capacity building services through the Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC), drawing on expertise from various institutions and partners in Japan. TDLC will launch its new operational phase “Phase 3” on July 1, 2015, after completing the renovation of information and communications technology facilities. Key features of the Phase 3 will include closer links to and integration with WBG’s operational programs.

In recognition of the important role of cities as engines of economic growth and of the world-class and often unique experience offered by a number of Japanese cities, the World Bank plans to extend its collaboration through the TDLC partnership to the city and municipal level. Through a new City Partnership Program, the WBG will collaborate with selected cities in Japan to document and share good practices and solutions for sustainable and inclusive development. The WBG will also facilitate and support provision of advice and technical assistance, drawing on expertise from Japanese cities, to help its clients address challenges of inclusive and sustainable urban development.

You are cordially invited to a seminar at TDLC to learn about experiences from the WBG and Japan in delivering capacity building services and fostering partnerships to support economic and social development in low and middle income countries. The seminar will also provide an opportunity for sharing knowledge about the key policy, infrastructure and institutional/capacity building challenges facing cities in developing countries and on avenues for collaboration.

Date

Wednesday, July 1, 4:30pm-6:00pm

Time

4:30pm-6:00pm

Location

The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center

Presentation

Barjor Mehta, Global Lead on Municipal Management, Governance and Finance
Victor Vergara, Lead Urban Specialist

Speech

Yasusuke Tsukagoshi, Special Representative, Japan, World Bank Group
Tadashi Yokoyama, Director of the Development Institutions Division, International Bureau, Ministry of Finance

Commentator

Shinichi Fukunaga, Director, International Affairs Office, General Affairs Division City Bureau, Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism
Toshiyuki Iwama, Technical Advisor to the Director General, Infrastructure and Peacebuilding Department, Japan International Cooperation Agency

Moderator

Philip Karp, Principal Knowledge Management Officer

Language


English and Japanese (with simultaneous interpretation)

Registration

The event is free, but requires registration before the event.

To attend, please register online by clicking here.

Alternatively, you can register through the World Bank Tokyo website.
As seating is limited, registration will be on a first come, first served basis.

Inquiries

World Bank Tokyo Office
E-mail: ptokyo@worldbankgroup.org
Phone: 03-3597-6650

 

 

 

 

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Mental Health & Psychosocial Well-being after Disasters

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Sharing Global Updates & Experiences from Philippines

Tuesday, June 30, 2015
Japan: 15:30-17:00 (Japan Time)
Philippines: 14:30-16:00 (Local time)






Introduction

During and after disasters, people experience mental and psychosocial distress, and this plays a key role in determining their quality of life, resilience and the success of their preparedness, recovery and ability to reconstruct.

Mental well-being and disability also have vast implications on mortality. In addition, economic loss due to problems related to mental well-being is far-reaching: Direct and indirect costs of mental illness exceed 4% of GDP.

Though, mental well-being and disability have long been neglected or forgotten in disaster risk reduction policies and programs, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction adopted at the UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction 2015 included mental health and psychosocial well-being as a key priority.

This distance knowledge sharing program will provide an opportunity to learn about global updates as well as experiences in the Philippines, through web/VC-based lectures and discussions.

Goals


To provide a knowledge sharing opportunity for policy makers and other change agents engaged in DRM and global health in Asia and the Pacific, to learn good practices and lessons learned related to mental health and psychosocial support in emergency settings from experience in the Philippines and Japan.

This program is jointly organized by the World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center, National Institute of Mental Health in Japan and the United Nations University International Institute for Global Health (UNU-IIGH).

Target Audience

National and local government officials from ministries and agencies.
Policy makers, DRM stakeholders, among others.

Speakers

Dr. Dinah Nadera
President, Foundation for Advancing Wellness, Instruction and Talents, Inc. Associate Professor of International Health, University of the Philippines Open University Technical Officer for Mental Health,
WHO Philippines

Dr. Atsuro Tsutsumi
Coordinator
United Nations University International Institute for Global Health

Moderator

Takashi Izutsu
Senior Knowledge Management Officer,
World Bank Group

Language

English

Delivery of the Program

You can participate in the program at your nearest GDLN center.
It will be a 1.5 hours interactive session using video conference technology.
Session consists of presentations followed by Q & A and open discussion.
Lecture materials will be provided at the GDLN center.

How to Apply

Please submit your confirmation of participation to the designated local contact person at your nearest GDLN center.

Webcast

This session will be webcast live. 
Click here 5-10 mins before the session starts.

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Sharing Good Practices on Transit-Oriented Development (TOD)

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A Knowledge Sharing Seminar: Cases from the World Bank and Japan

Tuesday, June 30, 2015
11:30 AM-1:30 PM (JST)






The World Bank Group has been accumulating operational and advisory experience in TOD across country programs in Colombia, China, Indonesia, India, Brazil and Vietnam, among others. The Bank has also consolidated emerging global knowledge on TOD by publishing “Transforming Cities with Transit,” and “Financing Transit-Oriented Development with Land Values”.

To undertake TOD, it is imperative that professionals with different disciplines (urban and transport planners, transport engineer, housing experts, financial experts, community development experts, etc.) work together, across institutional and organization boundaries. Cross-GP Community of Practice on Transit-Oriented Development was created to promote the aggregation, exchange, production, and dissemination of Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) knowledge across the WBG as well as the Bank’s client governments and other external partners.

To this end, the World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center, the External and Corporate Relations (ECRJP), the Social, Urban Rural and Resilience (GSURR) and the Transport and ICT Global Practice (GTIDR) units of the World Bank will host a videoconference seminar on sharing good practices on Transit-Oriented Development on June 30, 2015 from 11:30-13:30 (JST).

In this seminar, drawing on the WBG’s experiences in East Asia and South Asia, the challenges of automobile driven urban development faced by client countries and their TOD endeavors to address these challenges, among others, will be discussed. Japan’s long history and experience in TOD and Land Value Captures, which have helped them to convert their cities into world class transit metropolises will also be shared in this session.

Joint Organizers:

The World Bank (GSURR/GTIDR/TDLC/ECRJP) and Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT), the Government of Japan (GoJ)

Connecting sites:

Hanoi           9:30 AM-11:30 AM
Jakarta           9:30 AM-11:30 AM
New Delhi         8:00 AM-10:00 AM
Washington DC   Monday, June 29, 2015 10:30 PM-0:30AM

Opening Messages

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez
Senior Director
Global Practice on Social, Urban, Rural, and Resilience, World Bank Group

Yasu Tsukagoshi
Special Representative
The World Bank Tokyo Office (ECRJP)

Takehiko Mori
Counsellor for Global Strategies
Minister’s Secretariat, MLIT

Speakers:

Takeo Murakami
Director for International Negotiations Management
Policy Bureau, MLIT

Hiroaki Suzuki
Lecturer
University of Tokyo

Taimur Samad
Senior Urban Economist,
Global Practice on Social, Urban, Rural, and Resilience, World Bank Group

Closing Remarks

Barjor Mehta
Lead Urban Specialist
The World Bank, Social, Urban Rural and Resilience (GSURR)

Moderator:

Philip Karp 
Principal Knowledge Management Officer, GSURR, The World Bank

Pre-registration is required.
Please use the contact form below.

Webcast

This session will be webcast live. 
Click here 5-10 mins before the session starts.

Resources

Transforming_Cities_with_Transit.pdf
Financing_TOD_with_Land_Values.pdf
Eco2Cities_E.pdf

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PFA Orientation: Mutual Support for Resiliency after Crisis 4

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Join the Mental Health and Psychosocial Support Network!
(Community of Practice)
mhpss.net

Multi-country Orientation Videoconferences

June 19, 2015
Japan: 11:00-14:30
Korea: 11:00-14:30
Philippines: 10:00-13:30
Thailand: 9:00-12:30
Indonesia: 9:00-12:30

Cover of PFA Guide
Cover of PFA Field Guide

In close partnership with WHO, together with United Nations University International Institute for Global Health (UNU-IIGH) and Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) will host a video conference session on Psychological First Aid (PFA) for health and Disaster Risk Management (DRM) stakeholders in Asia and the Pacific.

TDLC will deliver an interactive learning opportunity for policy makers and other change agents engaged in DRM to learn the basics of PFA, raise awareness on the importance of integrating mental health and psychosocial perspectives in their respective DRM policies/programs, and develop capacity to provide safe support in crisis situation.


The orientation is structured as a 3.5 hour VC session.
It will cover the fundamentals of PFA, dos and don’ts, self-care techniques, interactive Q&As, role-plays, and open discussion.
A certificate of attendance will be provided at the end of the program.

Speakers:

Dr. Shekhar Saxena, Director, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, WHO (video message)
Ms. Makiko Ishida, Assistant Professor, Teikyo University
Ms. Ryoko Ohtaki, Associate Researcher, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health, National Information Center of Disaster Mental Health
Takashi Izutsu, Senior Knowledge Management Officer, TDLC (moderator)

Participating Countries:

Indonesia
Japan
Korea
Philippines
Thailand

Webcast

This session will be webcast live. 
Click here 5-10 mins before the session starts.

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World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction

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Resources

The World Bank Group on Disability
UN Enable

Taking Action towards a Disability-inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction Framework and its Implementation

Sunday, 15 March 2015
10 AM to 5:00 PM

Ede Jorge Ijjasz-Vasquez, Senior Director, GSURR of WBG presents at WCDRR
Ede Jorge Ijjasz-Vasquez, Senior Director, GSURR of WBG presents at WCDRR

    The World Bank Group will co-organize a public forum “Taking Action towards a Disability-inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction Framework and its Implementation” with the United Nations Secretariat for the Convention and the Rights of Persons with Disabilities of the Division for Social Policy and Development, Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) among other global partners.

    During the public forum, there will be discussions and concrete recommendations toward disability-inclusive disaster risk reduction (DiDRR) as a contribution to the Third World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction. The outcome and future implementation of the Hyogo Framework of Action II (HFA2) as an integral part of a post-2015 development agenda will also be discussed. A stocktaking, review and assessment of the effectiveness of existing DRR policies and programmes will be presented and the progress made and lessons learned for the advancement of DiDRR at local, national, regional and international levels will also be discussed.

    Location:

    Tohoku University, B200
    Sendai, Japan

    Program:

    Opening: An Overview of Disability Inclusion in Disaster Risk Reduction: Challenges and Obstacles (10:00am-10:50am)

    The Opening segment will discuss the status of DiDRR in the context of the on-going work toward a post-2015 development framework. It will include an overview of the DiDRR framework and its progress, challenges and obstacles in disability-inclusion in disaster risk reduction, resilience and reconstruction at both policy and programme levels.

    Ms. Akiko Ito, Chief, SCRPD/DSPD/UNDESA
    Mr. Jerry Velasquez, Director, Advocacy and Outreach, UNISDR
    Mr. Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez, Senior Director, Global Practice on Social, Urban, Rural, and Resilience, World Bank Group
    Mr. Kingo Toyoda, Deputy Director General, International Cooperation Bureau, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan
    Mr. Futoshi Toba, Mayor of City of Rikuzentakata
    Mr. Desmond Swayne, Minister of State, Department for International Development (DFID), United Kingdom
    Mr. Katsunori Fujii: President, Japan Disability Forum
    Mr. Yasunobu Ishii, Nippon Foundation
    Senator Kerryann Ifill, Barbados
    Senator Paul Njoroge Ben Githuku, Kenya

    Session I: Experience and Lessons Related to the Advancement of Disaster Risk Reduction, Resilience and Reconstruction (10:50am-12:30pm)

    This session will consist of sharing experiences and lessons learned on the ground to advance DiDRR, in particular, the experience of the 2011 Great Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami and DiDRR. This Session will be led by the Japan Disability Forum, in collaboration with DESA/DSPD and followed by an interactive discussion.

    Moderator: Ms. Miki Ebara, NHK World Editor-in-Chief

    Mr. Naoki Kurano: Japan Disability Forum/Japanese Federation of the Deaf
    Mr. Futoshi Toba, Mayor, City of Rikuzentakata
    Senator Monthian Buntan, Thailand
    Ms. Akiko Fukuda, Secretary-General, World Federation of the DeafBlind (Experience on the Ground)
    Ms. Marcie Roth, FEMA, USA
    Dr. Alex Camacho, Technical Secretary of Disability, Government of Ecuador

    Session II: Present and Future of DiDRR

    1. DiDRR policies, programme and implementation (1:30pm-3:00pm)

    This segment will discuss how to successfully advance DiDRR policies and their implementation in the global, regional, national and local contexts. The discussion will include good practices in removal of physical, social and cultural barriers to DiDRR as well as “emerging DiDRR issues”, such as mental health and mental well-being, social groups with increased vulnerabilities and promotion of the use of DiDRR technologies.

    Moderator: Dr. Takashi Izutsu, Senior Knowledge Management Officer, World Bank Group

    Vice Chancellor Professor Toshiya Ueki, Tohoku University
    Mr. Hiroshi Kawamura, Focal point for the Disability Caucus for DiDRR
    Prof. Norito Kawakami, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo
    Senator Kerryann Ifill, Barbados
    Mr. Adam Kosa, European Parliament
    Mr. Takashi Kubota, Deputy Mayor, City of Rikuzentakata
    Mr. Matthew Rodieck, Rehabilitation International
    Ms. Valerie Scherrer, CBM

    2. A Way Forward: steps toward realization of DiDRR (3:00pm-4:30pm)

    This segment will focus on “next steps” in preparation for the implementation of the HFA II. It will examine the role of governments, the UN system, organizations of persons with disabilities and other disability and civil society organizations, expert/academic communities, private foundations as well as the private sector and how they can go beyond “boundaries” to achieve the goal of disability-inclusion in disaster risk reduction, resilience and reconstruction. The discussion will also explore and take stock of ways and means to strengthen global/regional/national and local networks and build new partnerships for concrete results in implementing DiDRR.

    Moderator: Mr. Hiroshi Kawamura (Focal point for the Disability Caucus for DiDRR)

    Ms. Marcie Roth, FEMA, USA
    Mr. Ivars Nakurts, Latvian Presidency of the Council of European Union
    Senator Monthian Buntan, Thailand
    Senator Paul Njoroge Githuku, Kenya
    Dr. Atsuro Tsutsumi, Coordinator, United Nations University International Institute for Global Health
    Ms. Aiko Akiyama, UNESCAP
    Mr. Vladimir Cuk, Executive Director, International Disability Alliance

    Closing Session: Summary and Recommendations (4:30pm-5:00pm)

    The session will include a presentation of summaries of the preceding sessions as well as the recommendations for next steps to implement DiDRR in global, national, regional and local contexts.

    UNDESA
    Mr. Katsunori Fujii, Japan Disability Forum
    Mr. Yasunobu Ishii, Nippon Foundation

     

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    Foot and Mouth Disease and Disaster Risk Management

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    Resources:
    Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings
    IASC_mental_health.pdf
    WHO-OIE Operational Framework
    WHO_OIE_Operational_Framework.pdf

    Lessons from Miyazaki

    February 20, 2015







    In recent years, the world has seen many animal infectious disease epidemics such as avian flu, H1N1, and BSE. Animal disease epidemics threaten not only animal lives, but also the environment, agriculture, the economy, food security, and human health and life. Some animal diseases have the potential to spread to the human population, potentially killing tens of thousands of people in a short period of time. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the global annual cost of foot and mouth disease in terms of production losses and the need for prevention by vaccination has been estimated at approximately 5 billion dollars.

    In April, 2010, Miyazaki prefecture experienced an outbreak of foot and mouth disease.  Foot and mouth disease commonly affects animals like cows and pigs, and is one of the most contagious animal diseases. By July of the same year, 292 cases had been identified, and 300,000 cows and pigs were slaughtered. Economic losses due to the epidemic were estimated at about 2 billion US dollars. Miyazaki successfully contained this disaster in about 4 months without the disease spreading outside of the prefecture.

    In this video, key stakeholders who responded to the epidemic such as national and municipal government officials, farmers, and academia share their good practices and lessons learned from Miyazaki. They conclude that the consequences of animal disease epidemics are inter-disciplinary and far-reaching. It is important to take an inter-sectoral coordinated approach when developing disaster preparedness plans for responding to animal disease epidemics.

    The experience from Miyazaki teaches us that the “One health” approach, strengthening partnerships between stakeholders in physical, mental, and animal health and its ecosystem interface is critical not only for controlling the emergence of animal infectious diseases, but also for protecting against and recovering from economic loss.  Taking such an approach around the globe is important to improve the well-being of animals, humans and society.

    Video created by:
    The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center
    United Nations University International Institute for Global Health
    National Center for Neurology and Psychiatry, Japan
    Rakuno Gakuen University
     
    Special thanks to:
    World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)
    Miyazaki Prefectural Government

    Interviewees:

    Katsuya Iwasaki
    Head, Beef Division, Japan Agricultural Cooperatives, Osuzu

    Yoshinobu Hidaka
    President, Kyodo Farm

    Toshifumi Nishimoto
    Head, Animal Health Division, Miyazaki Prefectural Government

    Nobuyuki Marumoto
    Assistant Deputy Director, Miyakonojo Livestock Hygiene Service Center, Miyazaki Prefectural Government

    Kohei Makita
    Associate Professor of Veterinary Epidemiology, Rakuno Gakuen University

    Bernard Vallat
    Director General, World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)

    Michiko Watari
    Section Chief, National Information Center of Disaster Mental Health
    National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry
     

     

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    Knowledge Sharing on Suicide Prevention: Country Experience from Malaysia

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Dr._Nurashikin_Ibrahim.pdf
    Dr._Andrew_Mohanraj.pdf

    February 23, 2015 12:00-13:30 (JST)






    WHO estimates that almost one million deaths are due to suicide every year, the majority of which occur in low- and middle-income countries. Attempted suicide can be up to 20 times more frequent than suicide. As suicide is among the top three causes of death in the population aged 15-34 years (second leading cause for 10-24 year olds) globally, there is a massive loss to societies of young people. There is a need for immediate action which includes public health and cross-sector/inter-agency approaches.
    To respond to this neglected but important global priority, WHO launched the first-ever World Suicide Report in late 2014. According to the report, Malaysia’s percentage change in age standardized suicide rates 2000–2012 is -23.9% for both sexes.

    Tokyo Development Learning Center, the World Bank, together with the United Nations University International Institute for Global Health presents knowledge sharing seminar to focus on country case studies, including good practices and lessons learned.

    For this session, we will focus on Malaysia’ case, having Dr.Nurashikin Ibrahim, Ministry of Health, Malaysia and Dr.Andrew Mohan Raj, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Perdana University as speakers.

    Speaker
    Dr. Nurashikin Ibrahim, Ministry of Health, Malaysia
    Dr. Andrew Mohan Raj, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Perdana University

    Moderator
    Atsuro Tsutsumi, Research Fellow, United Nations University International Institute for Global Health (UNU-IIGH)

    Target Audience
    National and local government officials from ministries and agencies.
    Policy makers, DRM stakeholders, health specialists among others.

    Connecting sites
    Malaysia UKM
    Asian Institute of Management
    University of Indonesia
    Chulalongkorn University
    University of Peradeniya

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    Mental Well-being and Disability: Toward Accessible and Inclusive Sustainable Development Goals

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    A Panel Discussion Commemorating the International Day of Persons with Disabilities

    December 2, 2014 13:15-14:30

    Co-organized by United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, United Nations University International Institute for Global Health, The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center, and co-sponsored by the Permanent Mission of Argentina to the UN, Permanent Mission of Bangladesh to the UN, a panel discussion will be held at the United Nations Headquarters, New York, on December 2, 2014.

    Moderator: Takashi Izutsu, Senior Knowledge Management Officer, The World Bank Tokyo Development Center
    Opening Remarks: Akiko Ito, Chief, Secretariat for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, United Nations

    Panel Discussion
    H.E. Mateo Estreme, Deputy Permanent Representative, Permanent Mission of Argentina to the United Nations
    Ms. Saima Wazed Hossain, Chair of the National Advisory Committee on Autism in Bangladesh
    Dr. Atsuro Tsutsumi, Coordinator, United Nations University International Institute for Global Health
    Dr. Mark van Ommeren, Scientist, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, World Health Organization
    Prof. Harry Minas, Head, Global and Cultural Mental Health Unit, School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne
    Dr. Laura Upans, Department of Justice Canada

    Respondents:
    Dr. Kamal Lamichhane, Research Fellow, JICA Research Institute
    Ms. Kathryn Goetzke, Founder and Interim Executive Director, iFred

     

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    Public Forum: Disasters, Mental Well-being and Disability-Promoting Resilience for All

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Related File
    United Nations Expert Group Meeting report.pdf

    November 28, 2014

    On November 28, 2014, in Tokyo, Japan,  UNU in collaboration with the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, the World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center, and the National Information Center for Disaster Mental Health, Japan, will organize a public forum “Disasters, Mental Well-being and Disability: Promoting Resilience for All”.

    Research has revealed a high incidence of mood and anxiety symptoms as well as suicidal ideation among inhabitants in areas affected by disasters. Persons with mental or intellectual disabilities face multiple challenges and barriers in all the phases of disaster which gets augmented with misconception, stigma, discrimination and other human rights violations. Nevertheless, mental well-being and disability have often been neglected in international discussion and policy processes related to disasters.

    The forum will explore how to integrate mental well-being and disability issues into disaster risk management, drawing on experiences from Japan and other countries. Speakers from several UN agencies, NGOs and academia will discuss this challenge in relation to norms and standards, institutional arrangements, governance and practice. In particular, the event will focus on how the process to formulate a global post-2015 framework for disaster risk reduction can incorporate issues of mental well-being and disability.

    Programme:

    Moderator: Atsuro Tsutsumi, Coordinator, UNU-IIGH

    Welcome Remarks: Kazuhiko Takemoto, Director, UNU-IAS

    Panelists:
    Ana Cristina Thorlund, UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction
    Akiko Ito, Chief, Secretariat for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, UN DESA
    Florante E Trinidad, National Professional Officer, WHO Office of the Representative in the Philippines
    Yoshiharu Kim, President, National Information Center for Disaster Mental Health, National Institute of Mental Health, Japan
    Andrew Mohanraj, Chairperson, National Council for Persons with Disabilities in Malaysia

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    Expert Group Meeting on Mental Well-being, Disability and Disaster Risk Reduction

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Resources

    Report of the United Nations Expert Group Meeting on Mental Well-being, Disability, and Disaster Risk Reduction (November, 2014)
    EGM_MWDDRR_2014_Report.docx
    EGM_MWDDRR_2014_Report.pdf

    November 27-28, 2014

    The United Nations University International Institute of Global Health (UNU-IIGH) and the United Nations University Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability (UNU-ISP), and the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA), in close collaboration with the World Bank Tokyo Development Center (TDLC) and the National Institute of Mental Health, Japan, will organize an expert group meeting on mental well-being, disability and disaster reduction, in Tokyo, Japan, on November 27-28, 2014.

    During and after disaster, people experience mental health and psychosocial distress and this plays key role in determining quality of life, resilience, and effectiveness of preparedness, recovery and reconstruction. In addition, persons with mental or intellectual disabilities tend to face multiple and severe barriers in disasters. However, mental well-being and disability has long been neglected in disaster risk reduction policies and programmes.

    In the Expert Group Meeting, overview of issues, trends and international norms and standards, as well as good practices and lessons learned from different countries, related to mental well-being, disability and disaster risk reduction will be discussed.

    If we are to achieve sustainable human development which leaves no one behind, it is necessary to prioritize mental health and psychosocial well-being of all people including persons with physical, mental, intellectual, and sensory impairments. In addition, it is imperative to make disaster risk reduction measures inclusive of disability not leaving persons with mental or intellectual disabilities behind.

    Program:
    Facilitator: Dr Atsuro Tsutsumi, Coordinator, UNU-IIGH
    1. Welcome remarks: Prof. Kazuhiko Takeuchi, Assistant Secretary-General, United Nations: Senior Vice Rector, UNU
    2. Welcome remarks: Ms. Akiko Ito, Chief, Secretariat for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, DESA, United Nations
    3. Welcome remarks: Dr. Yoshiharu Kim, President of the National Information Center of Disaster Mental Health, National Institute of Mental Health, Japan
    4. UN frameworks on the rights of persons with disabilities: Including disability perspectives into disaster risk reduction:  Ms. Akiko Ito
    5. UN frameworks on disaster risk reduction: Toward a new frameworks which integrates mental well-being and disability: Ms. Ana Cristina Thorlund, Programme Officer, the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR)
    6. WHO perspective on mental health and psychosocial well-being in Emergency Settings: Mainstreaming mental health into disaster risk reduction: Dr. Mark Van Ommeren, Scientist, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, WHO (pre-recorded presentation)
    7. Mental health, disability and disasters: Experiences in Japan: Dr. Yoshiharu Kim
    8. Good practices and lessons learned: WHO response to mental well-being and disability in the disasters in Philippines and inclusion in DRR policy and programmes: Dr. Florante E Trinidad, National Professional Officer, WHO Office of the Representative in the Philippines
    9. Best practices and lessons learned: Mental well-being and disability after the nuclear accident in Fukushima: Dr. Jun Shigemura, Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, National Defense Medical University (recorded presentation)
    10. Best practices and lessons learned: Mental well-being and disability after the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident: Mr. Yurii Kushnarov, the First Secretary, the Embassy of Ukraine
    11. Best practices and lessons learned: Mental well-being and disability after the Indian Ocean Tsunami and the Typhoon Haiyan: Dr. Andrew Mohanraj, Regional Mental Health Development Advisor, CBM International/Member, National Council for Persons with Disabilities in Malaysia

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    10th Microfinance Training of Trainers (MFTOT 10)

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    A Blended Distance Learning Course

    January 2015-May 2015
    Students of MFTOT 8 gather at TDLC studio for a group discussion MFTOT 8 students gather at TDLC studio for a discussion.

    The Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) and the World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) are pleased to announce the tenth delivery of the Microfinance Training of Trainers course (MFTOT10) which will run from January to May 2015.

    The MFTOT10 is designed to strengthen the institutional capacity of microfinance in the Asia-Pacific region and African region by making high-quality microfinance training accessible to more decision-makers, professionals and practitioners in the field of microfinance as well as increasing the number and country coverage of accredited microfinance trainers in the Asia Pacific region and around the world.

    Background

    Microfinance is recognized as an effective development intervention that enhances access to financial services by low-income individuals. The Microfinance Training of Trainers (MFTOT) Course was initially jointly sponsored by the Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) and the World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) in 2005. The interactive microfinance distance learning course (MFDL) developed by UNCDF is the core learning material for study. This course has received high rating from participants and become popular in many countries.

    Over the past nine years, nine courses were successfully delivered in the Asia-Pacific region and around the world. Over 2,300 participants conducted self-study using the interactive e-Learning package, attended videoconference sessions, received online tutoring for 11 assignments and took part in the final exam. Among them, a total of 1137 in 64 countries were accredited to become a fully certified trainer of the UNCDF MFDL course. Top 32 graduates who are located in Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Ethiopia, Ghana, India, Japan, Kenya, Lao PDR, Malawi, Mongolia, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, PNG, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Uganda, and Vietnam were engaged to work as tutors for the courses.

    Since 2007, the course materials (workbook and interactive CD-ROM) have been translated from English into several local languages such as Chinese, Khmer, Lao, Thai, Vietnamese, Mongolian, and Bahasa Indonesia.

    Goals and Objectives

    MFTOT10 continues to pursue its goal of strengthening the institutional capacity of microfinance in the Asia-Pacific region and African region by making high-quality microfinance training accessible to more decision-makers, professionals and practitioners in the field of microfinance as well as increasing the number and country coverage of accredited microfinance trainers in the Asia Pacific region and around the world.

    Course Content

    The course consists of 3 modules and special topics in microfinance.

    At the end of Module I (The World of Microfinance), participants will be able to:
    • Describe fundamental concepts in microfinance
    • Design client-focused services
    • Apply effective microcredit methodologies
    • Describe the effects of the local environment on microfinance

    At the end of Module II (Financial Analysis), participants will be able to:
    • Read financial statements
    • Measure delinquency
    • Identify key financial factors
    • Identify effective interest rate practices
    • Measure financial viability

    At the end of Module III (Institutional Analysis), participants will be able to:
    • Gauge institutional viability
    • Strengthen relations between donors and microfinance institutions

    Through interaction with experts during videoconference sessions on special topics in microfinance, participants will be able to broaden their understanding of key issues in microfinance.

    Course Description

    The course features a unique, blended approach consisting of:

    1. Self-paced study using the Microfinance Distance Learning (MFDL) package developed by UNCDF. The package is available also online at: http://www.jointokyo.org/mfdl/
    2. Online tutoring and e-discussion. Tutors will assist participants throughout the course in completing course assignments through grading and feedback. Online discussions will be moderated by the team leader of tutors.
    3. Meeting with international microfinance experts through four 3-hour videoconference sessions at selected GDLN centers. The videoconference sessions will feature presentations and discussions on current issues and best practices in microfinance. The videoconferences will also be webcast live at: http://www.jointokyo.org/en/live
    4. Local courses in selected countries will be available during the same time period.

    Target Audience

    This course is aimed primarily at development practitioners, microfinance professionals, policy makers, donor staff, socially responsible investors, students, and others who want to improve their knowledge of best practices in microfinance.

    Participants who wish to develop their skills in delivering microfinance training and become fully certified trainers of the UNCDF course can earn accreditation by completing all weekly assignments and the final examination for this course.

    Types of Certificate and Accreditation of Trainers

    Statistics of previous courses showed that submission of assignments and receiving online tutoring help participants master the knowledge of best practices in microfinance. Since MFTOT5, submission of assignments to a designated tutor has become mandatory for all participants. Two types of certificate will be available for participants depending on their learning objectives, level of commitment and performance.

    Completion Certificate: Those who do not plan to become a certified trainer can earn a course completion certificate by completing the course assignments. They do not need to take the final exam. Course assignments may be submitted in a local language if the local language version of the CD-ROM and a country tutor are available. The learning material translation has been undertaken in China, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Mongolia, Thailand and Viet Nam.

    Accreditation Certificate: The accreditation is an important element of the course offering, and has great impact on the institutional capacity building for the microfinance sector. Course participants can earn this certificate and become a fully certified trainer of the UNCDF MFDL course by completing all assignments and final exam in English with quality up to a standard.

    *Certificates will be issued electronically in PDF.

    Course Fee

    The MFTOT10 courses will be sponsored jointly by ADBI and TDLC. Participants need to pay a course fee to receive learning materials and online tutoring. Revenue from the participants’ fees is used to partially cover operational costs.

    To meet the increasing demand for delivering this high quality learning program, we have introduced a new participation fee structure since MFTOT7. The full course fee is US$ 300. Participants in less developed and middle-income countries will receive financial supports from the course sponsors and organizers.

    · US$50 for participants in least developed countries (“IDA” or “Blend” category in the link)
    · US$150 for participants in middle-income countries (“IBRD” category except for “High-income economies”)
    · US$300 for all the other countries

    Country classifications can be found here:

    *Please note that country is based on participant’s residence/location, not his/her nationality.

    How to Apply

    Course registration will start on December 1, 2014.
    Interested participants should register online through the course webpage on Moodle.

    Requirements

    To successfully complete the course, participants should have:

    • English proficiency. Videoconference sessions and final examination will be conducted in English. For participants who wish to receive the accreditation certificate, English proficiency is crucial.
    • Strong commitment and self-discipline. The course will require between 10-20 hours of self-study per week, depending on the participant’s background in microfinance and language proficiency.
    • Support from employer. To ensure that participants can devote enough time to the course activities, we encourage participants to seek endorsement from their employers.

    In addition, participants will need:

    • A computer with 486 processor using Windows 95 or later, a CD-ROM drive, speakers or earphones, monitor of 800x600 resolution and at least 256 colors.
    • An e-mail account

    Important Dates for Videoconference Sessions

    (Tentative)

    VC#1: Thursday, January 29, 2015
    VC#2: Thursday, February 19, 2015
    VC#3: Thursday, March 5, 2015
    VC#4: Thursday, May 14, 2015  

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    Disability and Development “Learning from Country Experiences” Series

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center Since 2014








    The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) has been ratified or acceded by more than 150 countries. The United Nations High Level Meeting on Disability and Development held in 2013 highlighted the need for urgent action by all relevant stakeholders towards implementation of the CRPD and disability-inclusive national policies and programs.

    For effective and efficient implementation of disability-inclusive development and realization of true impact on the ground, knowledge sharing on the successes and failures as well as communication and collaboration among countries are critical.

    This series features policy makers and key actors in the field of disability from various countries who will share their perspectives, best practices, and lessons learned in their respective countries. The series aims to contribute to sharing and exchange of real experiences and practical, action-oriented knowledge among key stakeholders in the area of disability and development.

    Session 1:

    Disability and Accessibility:  Lessons from Japan. Dr. Soya Mori, Senior Researcher, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization (IDE-JETRO)

    Session 2:

    Disability and Economic Development: Lessons from Japan. Dr. Soya Mori, Senior Researcher, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization (IDE-JETRO)

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    JSDF:Safe Migration for Bangladeshi Workers

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center December 15, 2014 4:00 PM~5:30PM (JST)
    Collage for JSDF Bangladeshi workersTop left and bottom right images: Scott Wallace/World Bank. Top right and bottom left images: Thomas Sennett/World Bank. Images have been resized.

    The World Bank Group’s Trust Funds and Partnerships (DFPTF) in cooperation with the Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) and the World Bank Tokyo Office will hold the 8th Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) Dialogue Seminar, Safe Migration on Bangladeshi Worker on December 15, 2014.

    This session will highlight the achievements of one of the JSDF’s projects in Bangladesh, “Safe Migration for Bangladeshi Workers” by bringing together key stakeholders involved in the project. This seminar will present an overview of the preparation, implementation, and preliminary results of this project. The implementing agency, BRAC, together with project beneficiaries, will join the session via video conferencing from their respective project location(s), to present the key challenges and successes in project implementation.

    The “Safe Migration for Bangladeshi Workers” aims to reduce vulnerability of migrant workers and their families in 80 upazilas through (i) better access to accurate and timely information and services for safe migration and (ii) reducing dependency of migrants on middlemen by establishing and strengthening community-based organizations (CBOs).  The primary beneficiaries of this project are the poor and low-skilled population who may be seeking employment abroad. The project aims to benefit 864,000 potential migrants and their families who would receive training and orientation programs in 80 upazilas.

    The Government of Bangladesh, through the Ministry of Expatriate Welfare and Overseas Employment, has also shown keen interest in this project. Safe migration is an increasingly important issue in Bangladesh with regular media coverage of migration problems, leading to enormous public outcry for government action. Under this project,  transparency in the process is being improved by providing key information about prospects of foreign employment as well as the rules and regulations in host countries through partnership with NGOs and government. This project shows an example of using local and national networks to provide safe migration services, which can be scaled up nationwide by relevant government institutions.

    Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF)

    The Government of Japan and the World Bank established JSDF in June 2000, with the goal of providing grants to support community-driven development and poverty reduction projects that empower and directly improve the lives of the poorest and most vulnerable groups not reached by other programs. A unique and valued feature of the JSDF program is that it provides a platform for cooperation with non-governmental agencies and other local stakeholders in the development process. The Government of Japan has support some 300 social development programs and projects, up to the end of June 2014.

    Location

    The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Date and Time

    Monday, December 15, 2014
    4:00pm -5:30pm (JST)

    Language

    English and Japanese (simultaneous interpretation)

    Registration

    To attend, please register online from the link below. (Please refrain from using the “Contact Form” below.”)
    Admission is free.

    As seating is limited, registration will be on a first come, first served basis.

    For inquiries, please email the World Bank Tokyo Office, ptokyo@worldbankgroup.org
    Registration Form

    Japanese flag The World Bank image

    Contact Form







    Universal Health Coverage for Inclusive and Sustainable Development

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Live-webcast


    A live web-stream of the event will be available. Click here 5-10 mins before the session starts.

    related news stories

    Book Launch Seminar

    November 11, 2014
    11:30–14:00 (JST)






    BookCover_English

    The Japan–World Bank Partnership Program on Universal Health Coverage (UHC) has concluded its multi-country study and will be sharing its findings with policy makers and other key stakeholders in Indonesia, Myanmar, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam utilizing TDLC’s distance learning technology and network.

    The goals of UHC are to ensure that all people can access quality health services, to safeguard all people from public health risks, and to protect all people from impoverishment due to illness, whether from out-of-pocket payments for healthcare or loss of income when a household member falls sick.

    Countries as diverse as Brazil, France, Japan, Thailand, and Turkey have shown how UHC can serve as a vital mechanism for improving the health and welfare of their citizens, as well as lay the foundation for economic growth grounded in the principles of equity and sustainability. Eleven country studies (Bangladesh, Brazil, Ethiopia, France, Ghana, Indonesia, Japan, Peru, Thailand, Turkey, Vietnam) have been synthesized into a publication titled, “Universal Health Coverage for Inclusive and Sustainable Development: A Synthesis of 11 Country Case Studies.” In addition, the initiative resulted in an in-depth report on Japan’s experience entitled “Universal Health Coverage for Inclusive and Sustainable Development: Lessons from Japan.”

    The distance Seminar will cover key findings from the 11 country case studies and will convene principal researchers from the Japan study to discuss Japan’s role in promoting UHC abroad.

    Date and Time:

    Tuesday, November 11, 2014

    Tokyo: 11:30 – 14:00
    Manila: 10:30 – 13:00
    Bangkok: 9:30 – 12:00
    Hanoi: 9:30 – 12:00
    Jakarta: 9:30 – 12:00
    Yangon: 9:00 – 11:30

    Target Audience:

    Policy makers, health professionals, government officials, development practitioners in Japan and East Asia.

    Language:

    English only

    Connecting Sites:

    Bangkok, Thailand:
    Chulalongkorn University Thailand Center of Academic Resources Development Learning Center
    Hanoi, Vietnam:
    Vietnam Development Information Center, The World Bank
    Jakarta, Indonesia:
    University of Indonesia Distance Learning Center
    Manila, The Philippines:
    Asian Institute of Management Development Resource Center
    Yangon, Myanmar:
    The World Bank Yangon Office

    Scheduled Program:

    11:30 – 11:40 (JST)

    Opening Remarks and Introduction
    Tomoyuki Naito, Manager, Tokyo Development Learning Center, The World Bank
    Akiko Maeda, Lead Health Specialist, Health, Nutrition and Population Global Practice, World Bank Group (Moderator)

    11:40 – 11:55 (JST)

    Overview of the 11 Country Case Studies – Objectives and Key Findings
    Akiko Maeda, Lead Health Specialist, Health, Nutrition and Population Global Practice, World Bank Group

    11:55 – 12:05 (JST)

    Q & A

    12:05 – 12: 20 (JST)

    Political Economy of UHC Policies
    Michael Reich, Taro Takemi Professor of International Health Policy, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health

    12:20 – 12:30 (JST)

    Q & A

    12:30 – 12:50 (JST) 
    Lessons from Japan: What Japan Can Share from its Experience
    Naoki Ikegami, Professor and Chair, Department of Health Policy and Management, Keio School of Medicine

    12:50 – 13:00 (JST)

    Q & A

    13:00 – 13:10 (JST)

    Macro Process of Health Policy Making in Japan
    John Campbell, Project Researcher, Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo University; Professor Emeritus of Political Science, University of Michigan

    13:10 – 13:20 (JST)

    Q & A

    13:20 – 14:00 (JST)

    Discussion and Conclusion
    Moderator: Akiko Maeda

    Related Links

    The World Bank website on Health: Universal Health Coverage for Inclusive and Sustainable Development

     

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    The New Engine of Global Economy: the Internet Economy

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Presentation Materials
    Seminar 1:
    Tenzin_Dolma_Norbhu_WB.pdf
    Lingfang_(Ivy)_Li_China.pdf
    Mr._Hayashi_Japan.pdf

    AFDC Distance Learning Seminar Series

    Seminar 1: October 15, 2014 15:00-17:00 (Tokyo Time)
    Seminar 2: November 14, 2014 15:00-17:30 (Tokyo Time)
    *TDLC will not be hosting participants at our Center for Seminar 2. A live webcast will be available on the day of the event.

    Chinese migrant to the city learns IT skills_Li Wenyong / World Bank
    Li Wenyong/The World Bank

    Background

    There’s no need to further demonstrate the fact that the Internet has the power to shape the world. On the one hand, it has penetrated into almost every field of global economy and social lives and serves as a basic element in spurring social and economic development; on the other hand, it carries on the integration with traditional industries and thus, brings about new sources of economic growth. The Internet is driving the constant reforms in the economic system, industrial structure, and economic and social development worldwide. It’s the prerequisite in gaining an advantageous status in global competition and innovation in the future.

    It’s estimated by McKinsey that in 2025, the Internet technology along with other new technologies will bring about new economic growth and exert far-reaching influence on the world economy, contributing to 0.5 to 0.7 percent growth in global economic development trend value and 1 percent decrease in the inflation rate worldwide. Besides, enterprises’ operation has been influenced a lot by the Internet economy—business operators have to relieve themselves from the traditional ways of doing business, upgrade their mindset, seize the opportunities and face the challenges brought by the new business model and emerging service industry.

    In the wake of the financial crisis, China and other developing countries in the Asia-Pacific region are in urgent need of carrying out economic transformation and upgrading. The Internet is playing an increasingly important role in this regard. As the propeller of the new economic development, the Internet has created a brand-new model for economic development, generates tremendous economic and social benefits, and poses an overwhelming influence on the traditional economic model. It’s safe to say that the Internet has become the driving force for the development of emerging economies in the Asia-Pacific region and the whole world.
    How can we digest the huge changes in the Internet-influenced global economy? What can the developing countries do to cope with opportunities and challenges in the Internet economy era? What kind of reforms should the business operators adopt to upgrade their business model?

    Objective

    In order to summarize and share experience on “Internet Economy”, AFDC plans to launch a series of VC seminars in 2014 in collaboration with the World Bank and other GDLN affiliates to cope with opportunities and challenges in the Internet economy era.

    Target Audience

    Government officials, researchers and experts - particularly from EAP and South Asian countries - in the field of Internet economy.
    Representatives from civil society, academia and private sector, etc.

    Program

    Seminar 1

    Date:

    October 15, 2014

    15:00-15:10 Welcome Remarks
    AFDC & WB & GDLN-AP centers
    Overview of the program
    Brief introduction of GDLN-AP centers
    Moderator: Dr. Ji Rui (Jerry)

    15: 10-15:45 Session 1: The framework and global perspective
    Ms. Tenzin Dolma Norbhu, Lead ICT Policy Specialist, The World Bank
    Q&A Session

    15:45-16:20 Session 2: China’s Experience
    Ms. Lingfang (Ivy) Li, Associate Professor, Department of Industrial Economics, School of Management, Fudan University
    Q&A Session

    16:20-16:55 Session 3: Japan’s Experience
    Mr. Hirosato Hayashi, Director, Economic Research Office, 
    Global ICT Strategy Bureau, Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, 
    The Government of Japan
    Q&A Session

    16:55-17:00 Wrap-up and Closing
    Moderator: Dr. Ji Rui (Jerry)

    Seminar 2

    Date:

    November 14, 2014
    We will not be hosting participants at TDLC for Seminar 2.

    15:00-15:10 Welcome Remarks
    AFDC & WB & GDLN-AP centers
    Overview of the program
    Brief introduction of GDLN-AP centers
    Moderator: Dr. Ji Rui (Jerry)

    15:10-15:55 Session 1: The framework and global perspective
    Speaker from The World Bank (TBA)
    Q&A Session

    15:55-16:40 Session 2: China’s Experience
    Speaker from China (TBA)
    Q&A Session

    16:40-17:25 Session 3: Korea’s Experience
    Speaker from Korea (TBA)
    Q&A Session

    17:25-17:30 Wrap-up and Closing
    Moderator: Dr. Ji Rui (Jerry)


    AFDC logoKDI logoGDLN_AP logo

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    PFA Orientation: Mutual Support for Resiliency after Crisis 3

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Join the Mental Health and Psychosocial Support Network!
    (Community of Practice)
    mhpss.net

    Multi-country Orientation Videoconferences

    September 17, 2014 15:00-18:30(JST)
    Participating countries: Indonesia, Japan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand

    Cover of PFA Guide
    Cover of PFA Field Guide

    In close partnership with WHO, together with United Nations University International Institute for Global Health (UNU-IIGH) and Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) will host a video conference session on Psychological First Aid (PFA) for health and Disaster Risk Management (DRM) stakeholders in Asia and the Pacific.

    TDLC will deliver an interactive learning opportunity for policy makers and other change agents engaged in DRM to learn the basics of PFA, raise awareness on importance to integrate mental health and psychosocial perspectives in their respective DRM policies/programs, and develop capacity to provide safe support in crisis situation.

    The main author of the WHO Field Guide, Dr. Leslie Snider will serve as the main speaker for this session.

    The orientation is structured as a 3.5 hour VC session.
    It will cover the fundamentals of PFA, dos and don’ts, self-care techniques, interactive Q&As, role-plays, and open discussion.
    A certificate of attendance will be provided at the end of the program.

    Speakers:

    Dr. Shekhar Saxena, Director, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, WHO (video message)
    Dr. Leslie Snider, Consultant (facilitator)
    Mr. Ananda Galappatti, Director (Strategy), The Good Practice Group (facilitator)
    Dr. Asami Onuma, National Institute of Mental Health, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan (moderator)
    Takashi Izutsu, Senior Knowledge Management Officer, TDLC (moderator)

    Participating Countries:

    Indonesia
    Japan
    Philippines
    Sri Lanka
    Thailand

    Contact Form







    Session 5: HLMDD-International Disability NGO

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Discussion on the UN High-level Meeting on Disability and Development

    2014






    Venus Ilagan, Secretary General of Rehabilitation International, an international non-governmental organization for the advancement of rights and inclusion of persons with disabilities, speaks about how the recommendations and decisions made at the HLMDD can and should be utilized as a policy tool in various levels in different countries. She stresses that disability is a part of human diversity, and persons with disabilities are able to contribute to society if lack of access, discrimination, and poverty are properly addressed. 

    Speaker:

    Ms. Venus Illagan, Secretary General, Rehabilitation International

    Contact Form







    Session 4: HLMDD-JICA

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Discussion on the UN High-Level Meeting on Disability and Development

    2014







    Dr. Kenji Kuno, Senior Advisor on social welfare for the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) speaks about JICA’s expectations for the field and practice of disability and development based on the outcome document of the HLMDD. He introduces lessons learned from JICA’s projects as well as the challenges in the field for the future. He explains that it is crucial to change the society and environment rather than trying to change the individual, calling for the necessity to follow a twin-track approach, of empowerment and enablement, to promote equal opportunity for and full participation of persons with disability in development processes.

    Speaker:

    Dr. Kenji Kuno, Senior Advisor (Social Welfare), Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)

    Contact Form







    JSDF: New Livelihoods for Artisans and Craftspeople in Rural India

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Related Links

    To learn more about Jiyo! Project or to visit their e-commerce site:
    http://www.jiyo.net.in/

    JSDF Dialogue Series "Jiyo!" Project: Creating New Livelihood for Artisans and Crafts People in Rural India

    Wednesday, May 28, 2014 17:30-19:00pm (JST)
    JiyoBanner

    The World Bank’s Global Partnerships and Trust Fund Operations Department in cooperation with the Tokyo Development Learning Center and the World Bank Tokyo Office, will hold the seventh Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) Dialogue Series on May 28, 2014, 17:30-19pm.

    This session will highlight the challenges and achievements of one of the JSDF’s projects in India, namely, “Making Globalization Work for the Rural Poor in India” by bringing together key stakeholders involved in the project.

    This seminar will present an overview of the project, the innovative aspects of its preparation, planning and execution as well as lessons learned and results to date. The beneficiaries will connect via videoconferencing and share their rich experiences as active members in the planning and execution of the project.

    “Making Globalization Work for the Rural Poor in India” project has been developed in direct response to the demand from the rural community members in India at the bottom of the pyramid - the very poor, vulnerable and landless communities - whose livelihoods depend upon traditional cultural industries. The development objective of the project is to help the poor communities to set up and strengthen their own self-managed grassroots cluster level institutions to access decent sustainable livelihoods on a long term basis.

    craftspeople in Jiyo Project

    This project enhanced the livelihood opportunities and share of rural artisans in the market for cultural industries and related sectors in the Indian states of Andhra Pradesh, and Bihar which are among the poorest in India but are traditionally known for their rich cultural heritage, and where Bank assisted livelihood programs are on-going. Through helping poor artisan communities to establish/strengthen and manage their own cluster level institutions, the grant helped set-up mechanisms for decentralized decision-making and resource allocation for strengthening local artisan communities’ capacity to manage their own economic activity competitively.

    Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF)


    The Government of Japan and the World Bank established JSDF in June 2000, with the goal of providing grants to support community-driven development and poverty reduction projects that empower and directly improve the lives of the poorest and most vulnerable groups not reached by other programs. A unique and valued feature of the JSDF program is that it provides a platform for cooperation with non-governmental agencies and other local stakeholders in the development process. The Government of Japan has given support to over 300 social development programs and projects, up to the end of June 2013.

    Registration


    To attend, please register online from the link below. (Please refrain from using the “Contact Form” below.”)
    Admission is free.
    As seating is limited, registration will be on a first come, first served basis.
    For inquiries, please email the World Bank Tokyo Office, ptokyo@worldbankgroup.org
    Registration Form

    日本の旗 JSDF

    Contact Form







    Session 3: HLMDD-World Report on Disability

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Discussion on the UN High-level Meeting on Disability and Development

    2014






    Aleksandra Posarac, program leader at the World Bank Manila Office worked as an advisor on disability issues for five years until 2013 at the World Bank headquarters in Washington D.C. She is also one of the authors of the World Report on Disability, published by the World Bank and the World Health Organization in 2011. From this experience, she talks about the significance of the HLMDD and what the World Bank and other development partners can do to implement or help the various governments implement the recommendations and decisions made in the HLMDD. Reiterating that disability should not be the reason for exclusion or discrimination in an inclusive development process, she also describes the role that the World Report on Disability has played in informing the HLMDD.

    Speaker:

    Ms. Aleksandra Posarac, Program Leader
    EAP Country Unit, The World Bank

    Contact Form







    Session 2: HLMDD-The United Nations

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Discussion on the UN High-level Meeting on Disability and Development

    2014






    Ms. Akiko Ito, Chief, Secretariat for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA), United Nations explains about the background and the outcome document of the first ever, UN High-Level Meeting on Disability and Development. The UN has a long standing commitment to the equality and full participation of persons with disabilities in society and development. She urges that to achieve a disability-inclusive post-2015 development agenda, it is critical that the outcome document of the HLMDD be translated in to real changes at national and local levels. She calls action for all to make development inclusive, accessible, sustainable and equitable for everybody.

    Speaker:

    Ms. Akiko Ito, Chief, Secretariat for the CRPD, DESA, United Nations
    Language: English

    Contact Form







    Disability and Economic Development: Lessons from Japan

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Video Lecture

    April 2014






    About 15% of the world’s population lives with some form of disability, and the number is growing. This is due to the ageing population – older persons have a higher risk of disability – and the increase in chronic health conditions associated with disability, such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and mental illness on a global scale. It is impossible to achieve development goals if 15% of the world population are ignored or excluded.

    Persons with disabilities are more likely to be unemployed and generally earn less even when employed. On average, employment rate of persons with disabilities was over half that for persons without disabilities. However, at the same time, persons with disabilities may have extra costs for personal support or for medical care or assistive devices. Economic contributions of persons with disabilities and their family would be promoted if barriers are addressed and accessibility is ensured.  (From the World Report on Disability. WHO and the World Bank, 2011)

    Dr. Soya Mori, Senior Researcher at the Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization (IDE-JETRO), lectures on disability and economic development based on his research and experience in Japan and in the world.

    With sign language (ASL), voice-over and caption.

    Lecturer

    Dr. Soya Mori, Senior Researcher, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization (IDE-JETRO)

    About the Video

    In American Sign Language (ASL), voice-over and caption.

    Soya Mori, Senior Researcher at the Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO) speaks on the topic of disability and economic development, highlighting some key issues in forming disability-inclusive policies in developing countries by introducing some examples from Japan and some developing countries. He shed light on the close link between disability and poverty, and argued for advancing the rights of persons of disability, providing access to decent employment, and empowering persons of disability in the processes of development.

    Contact Form







    Disability and Accessibility:  Lessons from Japan

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Video Lecture

    April 2014






    Across the world, persons with disabilities have poorer health outcomes, lower education achievements, less economic participation and higher rates of poverty than persons without disabilities. This is partly because persons with disabilities experience barriers in accessing services, transport, information among others.

    The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006) highlights the role of the environment in facilitating or restricting participation for persons with disabilities. For example, removing barriers in public accommodations, transport, information, and communication will enable persons with disabilities to participate in education, employment, and social life, reducing their isolation and dependency. Across domains, key requirements for addressing accessibility and reducing negative attitudes are access standards; cooperation between the public and private sector a lead agency responsible for coordinating implementation; training in accessibility; universal design for planners, architects, and designers; user participation; and public education. These are cost effective, and will contribute to well-being of aging populations and beyond. (From the World Report on Disability. WHO and the World Bank, 2011)

    Dr. Soya Mori, Senior Researcher at the Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization (IDE-JETRO) lectures on disability and accessibility based on his experience in Japan and in the world.

    Lecturer

    Dr. Soya Mori, Senior Researcher, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization (IDE-JETRO)

    About the Video

    In American Sign Language (ASL), voice-over and caption.

    Soya Mori, Senior Researcher at the Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO) speaks on the topic of disability and accessibility, pointing out the key issues at the policy-making level when realizing accessibility in developing countries. He mentions that it’s not always important to make large-scale investments such as constructions, but it is important to provide needed services within a community, even if they are implemented on a smaller scale. There is no single technology or method that provides a solution to inaccessibility. Persons with disability themselves are the ones who know best about the needs and methods for accessibility. They should be involved in the process to select the best option that strikes a good balance of effectiveness and cost for realizing accessibility.

    Contact Form







    PFA Orientation: Mutual Support for Resiliency after Crisis 2

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Join the Mental Health and Psychosocial Support Network!
    (Community of Practice)
    mhpss.net

    Multi-country Orientation Videoconferences

    April 11, 2013 14:00-17:30 (JST)/13:00-16:30 (ULAT)
    Connecting sites: Japan, Mongolia, Philippines, Sri Lanka

    PFA_Dec13
    Dr. Snider lecturing at TDLC on December 13, 2013

    In close partnership with WHO, together with United Nations University International Institute for Global Health (UNU-IIGH) and Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) will host a video conference session on PFA for health and Disaster Risk Management (DRM) stakeholders in Asia and the Pacific.

    TDLC will deliver an interactive learning opportunity for policy makers and other change agents engaged in DRM to learn the basics of PFA, raise awareness on importance to integrate mental health and psychosocial perspectives in their respective DRM policies/programs, and develop capacity to provide safe support in crisis situation.

    The main author of the WHO Field Guide, Dr. Leslie Snider, Sr. Programme Advisor of the War Trauma Foundation will be onsite in Mongolia and serve as the main speaker for this session.

    The orientation is structured as a 3.5 hour VC session.
    It will cover the fundamentals of PFA, dos and don’ts, self-care techniques, interactive Q&As, role-plays, and open discussion.

    Speakers:

    Dr. Shekhar Saxena, Director, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, WHO (video message)
    Dr. Leslie Snider, Sr. Programme Advisor of the War Trauma Foundation (main speaker)
    Dr. Atsuro Tsutsumi, Coordinator, United Nations University International Institute for Global Health (moderator/facilitator)
    Dr. Ryoko Ohtaki, National Information Center of Disaster Mental Health, Japan (moderator/facilitator)
    Takashi Izutsu, Senior Knowledge Management Officer, TDLC (moderator/facilitator)

    Participating countries:

    Japan
    Mongolia
    Philippines
    Sri Lanka

    Contact Form







    The Pattern of Global Trade: Opportunities and Challenges for the Emerging Economics

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Presentation Files

    Session 1

    Mr._Xu_Mingqui_China.pdf
    Mr._Pham_Vietnam.pdf
    Prof._Abe_Japan.pdf

    Session 2

    Mr._Chen_China.pdf
    Mr._Shadikhodjaev_Korea.pdf
    Mr._Rasagam_WB.pdf

    Access the archived video from here.

    Seminar 2: Free Trade Zone: International experience and local development

    June 10, 2014
    13:00 -15:30 (JST)

    Containers at a port
    Dominic Sansoni/World Bank

    As the world economy becomes more globalized, the developing countries, which account for over 40 percent of the global trade, play an increasingly important role in global economy and trade. Since the financial crisis, the global economic and trade pattern has been readjusted, and new rules of global trade, which pursue higher liberalization in business operation, investment and services, and emphasize more on fair competition and protection of rights and interests, have been established. The new pattern may to a large extent reshape the external environment of the emerging economies and reconstruct the global economic value chain, and thus may again repel the emerging economies, including China, to the edge of the international trade system. Emerging economies are therefore confronted with severe challenges to establish more reasonable economic and trade policies for the purpose of playing an even more active role in the global economy and boosting sustainable local economic development.

    In recent years, China witnessed a rapid growth in its foreign trade. In 2012, China has surpassed the US to become the world’s biggest trade country with its overall foreign trade volume reaching $3.87 trillion. However, like the other developing countries, China lacks diversity in its foreign trade structure and received limited sharing in global value chains. Therefore, it’s of China’s top priority to further develop trade in services and enhance its level of investment liberalization to be further integrated into the global economy and contribute to its economic and structural transformation and upgrading.

    This program is jointly organized by the Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Center (AFDC), Korean Development Institute (KDI) School of Public Policy and Management, The World Bank, and the WB Tokyo Development Learning Center.

    In order to summarize and share experience on“the New Pattern of Global Trade”, AFDC plans to launch a series of VC seminars in 2014 in collaboration with the World Bank and other GDLN affiliates to cope with opportunities and challenges for the emerging economies.

    Program Description

    Seminar 2: Free Trade Zone: International experience and local development

    Date: June 10, 2014
    Time: 13:00 -15:30 (JST)

    The framework and global perspective

    Mr. Ganesh Rasagam, Lead Private Sector Development Specialist, The World Bank

    Experience sharing

    Mr. Bo Chen, Associate Department Head, Shanghai University of Finance and Economics
    Mr. Sherzod Shadikhodjaev, Professor, KDI School
    Moderator: Dr. Ji Rui, Senior Economist, Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Center

    Seminar 1: Global Trade Facilitation-Trends and Challenges

    Date: April 9, 2014
    Time: 11:30 -14:00 (JST)

    The framework and global perspective

    Mr. Duc Minh Pham, Senior Economist, the World Bank

    Experience sharing

    Prof. Xu Mingqi, Professor & Director, Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences
    Mr. Shigeyuki Abe, Professor, Doshisha University, Faculty of Policy Studies
    Moderator: Dr. Ji Rui, Senior Economist, Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Center

    Archived Video

    An archived video of this seminar is available on AFDC website.

    Target audience

    Policy makers from central & local government agencies, particularly from EAP and South Asian countries - in the field of global economy and trade.
    Representatives from civil society, academia and private sector, etc.

    Registration

    Advance registration required (first-come-first-served).
    Please register by sending us an email or using the form below, indicating your name, organization, telephone number, e-mail address.

    AFDC logoWB logoKDI logo

    Contact Form







    Session 1: HLMDD-The World Bank

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Discussion on the UN High-level Meeting on Disability and Development

    2014






    The World Bank Group stated at the UN High-Level Meeting on Disability and Development (HLMDD) held on September 23, 2013, that the development consequences of disability cannot be ignored, and unless persons with disability are included into the post-2015 development agenda, the agenda will fail to be truly inclusive. The HLMDD is a historic event and its outcome should be understood and implemented by as many stakeholders as possible. This session will highlight the basic facts on disability and the outcome of HLMDD to guide efforts towards the creation of a fully inclusive society through 2015 and beyond.

    Speaker:

    Ms. Anush Bezhanyan
    Sector Manager, Social Protection & Labor,
    Human Development Network, The World Bank

    Contact Form







    Introduction to Islamic Finance 2014

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Related Program
    Introduction to Islamic Finance

    Session Dates Changed
    March 12, 2014 until March 27, 2014
    13:00-16:00 (East Africa Time)
    19:30-22:00 (Japan Standard Time)
    Please note we are not accepting participants from Japan.







    Workers gathering at desk  Arne Hoel/The World Bank

    Introduction

    Islamic finance has been growing rapidly in recent years and attracting greater attention in the wake of the recent financial crisis. The World Bank and the Islamic Development Bank have set out a framework for collaboration between the two parties and lend support to global, regional and country efforts in the development and expansion of Islamic finance globally.
     
    In 2012, the total global assets of Islamic banking were $1.3 trillion, which is estimated to be $1.6 trillion by the end of 2013. Statistics by Global Islamic Finance Report show that Islamic finance grew consecutively at a compound annual rate of 15 to 20 % over the last decades. Most interestingly, Islamic financial system has proved inherent resistance to the recent global economic crises during 2008 to 2012.

    There are two fundamental directions of financial inclusion or access of finance under the present practices of Islamic finance activities. They are – (a) promoting risk sharing contracts that is to generate alternative debt sharing finance comparatively different from the conventional debt based finance. This is enough potential for enhancing accesses to the required finance and its proper conflict free and sustainable management. (b) Redistribution of the wealth of the society among its member that is, in principle, complement to the prior direction, targeting of the poor people of the society in order to provide a comprehensive financial approach for exterminating poverty and for building resilient and equity based society.

    In 2012, with the initiative of the Association of African Distance Learning Center (AADLC) , in partnership with the Global Development Learning Network (GDLN) and the Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC), a comprehensive course “Introduction to Islamic Finance” was designed and organized to share fundamentals of Islamic finance with a special focus on policy makers and officials of the financial sector in Africa.
     
    This program will be the second delivery following the success of the first program delivered in 2012

    Learning Contents

    Each module will feature presentations and interactive discussions on current issues and best practices in Islamic finance with international experts. The program will be delivered in three modules as follows.

    Session 1: Introduction to Islamic Finance – presenting definition and fundamentals of Islamic finance;  global trend and estimated growth of the sector; overview of emerging markets, products, and services in Islamic finance; and geographical expansion of Islamic Finance.
    (March 12, 2014)

    Session 2: Understanding Islamic Finance structures – presenting basic models of Islamic finance (trade-based and investment-based models); and various financial products and transaction models (loans, deposits, Sukuk-bonds, funds, Takaful-insurance) with practical examples.
    (March 19, 2014)

    Session 3: Establishing Islamic Finance Architecture: an African model – presenting legal system on Islamic finance;  legal issues under Islamic finance; financial framework for financial inclusion; case studies and best practices in Africa/different regions; recent trends in Islamic finance and Africa; and networking and further study opportunities in Islamic finance.
    (March 27, 2014)

    Goals

    After attending the program, participants will be able to;

    • Describe fundamental concepts in Islamic finance and its growth potential,
    • Structure financial products and mechanisms under Islamic finance,
    • Understand key actors and roles in regulating, supervising and monitoring, and
    • Broaden understanding from practical lessons and case studies around the world on Islamic finance

    Speaker

    Mr. Etsuaki Yoshida

    Adjunct Research Fellow, Center for Finance Research,  Waseda University, Tokyo.
    Director and Senior Economist, Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC).


    Mr. Yoshida has been teaching Islamic finance at the Waseda Graduate School of Finance as a visiting associate professor. He is also Director and Senior Economist at Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC). Before moving to JBIC in 2007, he was an economist at Bank of Japan in charge of the Japanese economy and foreign exchange markets.


    Moderator

    Session#1
    Mr. Mor Seck, Senegal, Manager/Director Senegal Distance Learning Centre and President of the Association of African Distance learning Centers (AADLC)

    Session#2-3
    Mr. Charles Y. Senkondo, Secretary General of the Association of African Distance learning Centers (AADLC), and Director of Tanzania Global Learning Agency –TaGLA

    Target Audience

    National and local government officials from financial ministries and agencies.

    Officers from commercial banks, legal department, insurance, security and asset management companies.

    Staff from microfinance institutions and NGOs who wish to develop knowledge on Islamic finance for their business activities in Africa.

    Financial sector staff from international organizations.

    Delivery Method

    You can participate in the program at your nearest GDLN center.

    Each session will be a 2.5-hour interactive session using video conference technology.

    Each session consists of presentations followed by Q&A and open discussion.

    Lecture materials will be provided at the GDLN centers.

    Language

    English only

    How to Apply

    Please contact your nearest distance learning center.

    Participating DLCs:

    Tanzania
    Uganda
    Madagascar

    If you cannot join from a DLC nearest you, you can also watch the webstreaming.

    Contact Form







    PFA Orientation: Mutual Support for Resiliency after Crisis 1

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Join the Mental Health and Psychosocial Support Network!
    (Community of Practice)
    mhpss.net

    Multi-country Orientation Videoconferences

    December 13, 2013 14:00-17:30 (JST)
    Connecting countries:
    China, Japan, Nepal, Thailand, Vietnam

    In close partnership with WHO, together with United Nations University International Institute for Global Health (UNU-IIGH) and Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) will host a video conference session on PFA for health and Disaster Risk Management (DRM) stakeholders in Asia and the Pacific.

    Cover of PFA Guide
    Cover of PFA Field Guide

    Having the main author of the WHO Field Guide, Dr. Leslie Snider, Sr. Programme Advisor of the War Trauma Foundation as the main speaker, TDLC will deliver an interactive learning opportunity for policy makers and other change agents engaged in DRM to learn the basics of PFA, raise awareness on importance to integrate mental health and psychosocial perspectives in their respective DRM policies/programs, and develop capacity to provide safe support in crisis situation.

    The orientation is structured as a 3.5 hour VC session.
    It will cover the fundamentals of PFA, dos and don’ts, self-care techniques, interactive Q&As, role-plays, and open discussion.

    Speakers:

    Dr. Shekhar Saxena, Director, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, WHO (video message)
    Dr. Leslie Snider, Sr. Programme Advisor of the War Trauma Foundation (main speaker)
    Dr. Yoshiharu Kim, Director of National Information Center of Disaster Mental Health in Japan (moderator)
    Takashi Izutsu, Senior Knowledge Management Officer, TDLC (facilitator)

    Participating countries:

    China
    Japan
    Nepal
    Thailand
    Vietnam

    Contact Form







    “Mental Well-being, Disability, and Development”

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Related News:
    Report on the Panel Discussion on Mental Well-being, Disability, and Development

    Celebrating International Day of Persons with Disabilities

    December 3, 2013
    11:30am-1:00pm (EST)


    There is strong stigma and discrimination against persons with mental or intellectual disabilities. In disaster or conflict settings in particular, the needs of persons with mental or intellectual disabilities are often neglected. In the United Nations Expert Group Meeting on Mental Well-being, Disability and Development held in April 2013, the expert group concluded that 1) mental well-being should be integrated into all the social development efforts as a key indicator for sustainable development, and 2) protection and promotion of the rights of persons with mental or intellectual disabilities should be integrated and strengthened as a key priority in disability-related policies and programs.

    On December 3, in celebration of International Day of Persons with Disabilities, which aims to raise awareness and mobilize support for critical issues related to the inclusion of persons with disabilities in society and development, WBTDLC, UN/DESA, and UNU-IIGH will conduct a panel discussion on mental well-being, disability and development at the UN Headquarters in NY. Topics such as mental or intellectual disabilities, and mental well-being as a priority in development with special attention to the life cycle perspective and its emphasis on people-centered approaches to development will be discussed.

    Date:

    December 3, 2013

    Time:

    11:30am-1:00pm (EST)

    Language:

    English

    Contact Form







    Training of Trainers (ToT) on Psychological First Aid (PFA)

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Join the Mental Health and Psychosocial Support Network!
    (Community of Practice)
    mhpss.net

    December 9-12, 2013
    Location: Arcadia Ichigaya

    WHO in collaboration with its partners published “Psychological First Aid: Field Guide” (PFA Field Guide) in 2011 to provide an easy-to-understand guidance on what to do and what not to do when trying to support a fellow human being after going through a serious crisis event. The PFA Field Guide has been endorsed by the UN, UNICEF, UNHCR,  International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), Plan International, among others, and the UN Secretary General mandated the PFA training for human resources and security personnel in the UN worldwide. The PFA has been widely employed in Japan after the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    TDLC together with the National Information Center of Disaster Mental Health (Japan) and the United Nations University will host a 4-day training of trainers (ToT) on PFA at Arcadia Ichigawa.

    Dr. Leslie Snider, Sr. Advisor, War Trauma Foundation, who is one of the main authors of the “WHO PFA Field Guide” will facilitate the session.

    This ToT training is intended for municipal government officials from disaster-prone areas in Japan, disaster/humanitarian response experts, members of the Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT), Japan, and constituencies from the education sector.

    Date:

    December 9-12, 2013

    Training Schedule:

    Day 1 & 2: Lectures, role play-base learning, and discussions.
    Day 3: Group-based practical training with supervisors
    Day 4: Reflections, discussions, ethics on disseminating PFA, wrap-up

    Location

    Arcadia Ichigaya

    Contact Form







    Suicide Prevention: How to Address One Million Deaths a Year, Toward the World Suicide Report

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Resources

    mhGAP_Intervention Guide eng.pdf
    Public Health Action for the Prevention of Suicide eng.pdf
    Mental Health Action Plan 2013 - 2020 eng.pdf

     

    ;

    Co-organized with

    the United Nations University International Institute for Global Health and the University of Tokyo

    Special Thanks to

    The World Health Organization (WHO)

    Panelists

    Dr. Shekhar Saxena, Director, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, WHO
    Dr. Lakshmi Vijayakumar, SNEHA, Suicide Prevention Centre, India
    Dr. Tadashi Takeshima, Director, National Institute of Mental Health, NCNP

    Background

    WHO estimates that almost one million deaths are due to suicide every year, the majority of which occur in low- and middle-income countries.  Attempted suicide can be up to 20 times more frequent than suicide. As suicide is among the top three causes of death in the population aged 15-34 years (second leading cause for 10-24 year olds) globally, there is a massive loss to societies of young people. There is a need for immediate action which includes public health and cross-sector/inter-agency approaches.

    Goals

    To respond to this neglected but important global priority, WHO will launch the first-ever World Suicide Report. As part of the process, international experts get together in Tokyo to discuss variety of aspects of suicide. Taking this opportunity, the World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center together with the United Nations University International Institute for Global Health in collaboration with the University of Tokyo presents the distance seminar to highlight key statistics, and an evidence-based solution which have been found in the development process of the report.

    Speakers and Audience

    The Director of the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, WHO, will give a presentation the current global situation and WHO’s response. An expert from India will talk about her success in working on suicide prevention in communities in India. An expert from Japan will share Japan’s experience in successfully having decreased number of suicide deaths.  Main targets are policy makers and other key stakeholders engaged in national system and policy development.

    Resources

    mhGAP_Intervention Guide eng.pdf
    Public Health Action for the Prevention of Suicide eng.pdf
    Mental Health Action Plan 2013 - 2020 eng.pdf

    Contact Form







    High-level Meeting on Disability and Development (HLMDD) Series

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Resources

    The World Bank Group on Disability
    UN Enable

    December 3, 2013






    For more details on individual sessions in this series, please visit the session pages linked in the sidebar.

    The UN High-Level Meeting on Disability and Development (HLMDD) was held at the level of Heads of State and Government, with participation of the World Bank and other UN agencies, as well as more than 800 representatives of organizations of persons with disabilities, and the UN Messenger of Peace Stevie Wonder, in the United Nations General Assembly, on September 23, 2013.

    Reaffirming the international community’s resolve in promoting the rights of all persons with disabilities, HLMDD adopted an outcome document stressing the need to ensure accessibility for and inclusion of persons with disabilities in all aspects of development and of giving them due consideration in the emerging post-2015 UN development agenda.

    Among other things, the outcome document underlined the need for “urgent action” by all stakeholders towards adoption and implementation of more ambitious disability-inclusive national development strategies with disability-targeted actions, backed by increased international cooperation and support.

    In the HLMDD Series, key focal points on disability from the World Bank, United Nations, JICA and an international NGO discussed highlights of the outcome document of HLMDD and the way forward beyond 2015 from respective perspective.

    Sessions:

    1. Ms. Anush Bezhanyan, Sector Manager, Social Protection & Labor, Human Development Network, The World Bank
    2. Ms. Akiko Ito, Chief, Secretariat for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, DESA, United Nations
    3. Ms. Aleksandra Posarac, Country Sector Coordinator, Human Development, The World Bank
    4. Dr. Kenji Kuno, Senior Advisor (Social Welfare), Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)
    5. Ms. Venus Illagan, Secretary General, Rehabilitation International

    Contact Form







    Psychological First Aid (PFA): Mutual Support for Resiliency after Crisis

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Psychological first aid: Guide for field workers
    PFA_Field_Guide_E.pdf

    Inter-Agency Standing Committee
    Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings
    IASC_mental_health.pdf

    Mental Health Gap Action Programme
    mhGAP Intervention Guide
    mhGAP_Intervention_Guide_E.pdf

    United Nations Expert Group Meeting on Mental Well-being, Disability and Development
    Outcome Document
    UNU_EGM_MWDD_2013.pdf

    The Facilitator’s Manual for Orienting Field Workers
    PFA Facilitators Manual for Orienting Field Workers.pdf

    The Sphere Project
    Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Humanitarian Response
    The Sphere Handbook 2011

    Join the Mental Health and Psychosocial Support Network!
    (Community of Practice)
    mhpss.net

     






    Resources

    Psychological first aid: Guide for field workers_E.pdf
    IASC_Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings.pdf


    Different kinds of crises such as war, natural disasters, accidents, fires and interpersonal violence including sexual and gender-based violence occur in the world. Although every person has strengths and abilities to cope with life challenges, mental health and psychosocial support can be beneficial in some cases.

    Cover of PFA Guide
    Cover of PFA Field Guide

    WHO in collaboration with its partners published “Psychological First Aid: Field Guide” (PFA Field Guide) in 2011 to provide an easy-to-understand guidance on what to do and what not to do when trying to support a fellow human being after going through a serious crisis event. The PFA Field Guide has been endorsed by the UN, UNICEF, UNHCRInternational Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), Plan International, among others, and the UN Secretary General mandated the PFA training for human resources and security personnel in the UN worldwide. The PFA has been widely employed in Japan after the Great East Japan Earthquake.


    This training program will promote participants’ understandings on basics of PFA, do’s and don’ts, and self-care technique, through web/VC-based lectures and discussions. The program will provide basic knowledge on how to offer PFA, as well as basics on mental health and psychosocial support after crises which will be an emerging priority in disaster risk management policy making/implementation. The program will be facilitated jointly by the World Bank/TDLC, UNU-IIGH, and the National Institute of Mental Health in Japan, in close partnership with WHO.

     

     

     

    Contact Form







    Public Forum:A Society that Cares about Mental and Psychosocial Well-being in Emergency Settings

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Join the Mental Health and Psychosocial Support Network!
    (Community of Practice)
    mhpss.net

    December 12, 2013

    Based on its experience from many disasters including the Hanshin-Awaji Great Earthquake and the Great East Japan Earthquake, Japan has rich and unique experience and expertise on mental and psychosocial support in crisis settings.

    PFA BookCover
    IASC BookCover

    The Japanese efforts are consistent with the international community’s consensus to integrate mental well-being into disaster response and disaster risk management. The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC) PFA program aims at sharing the Japanese experience together with introducing key global policy/practical tools such as “WHO’s PFA Field Guide” and the “Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings” that are widely used international gold standards in the area.

    The Public Forum to be held in the UN House Tokyo, Japan, is open to the general public in Japan to provide an opportunity to learn basics of mental health and psychosocial support in emergency settings, and to share their experience and have dialogues with international and national experts in mental health and psychosocial support in crisis situations.  

    Opening Remarks:

    Dr. Atsuro Tsutsumi, Coordinator, International Institute for Global Health, United Nations University (UNU)

    Welcome Remarks

    Dr. Shekhar Saxena, Director, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, World Health Organization (WHO)

    Keynote Lecture:

    Dr. Leslie Snider, Sr. Programme Advisor & Main Author, WHO PFA Field Guide, War Trauma Foundation

    Panelists:

    Dr. Leslie Snider, Sr. Programme Advisor, War Trauma Foundation
    Dr. Kim Yoshiharu, President, National Information Center of Disaster Mental Health, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan
    Dr. Takashi Izutsu, Senior Knowledge Management Officer, TDLC, The World Bank
    Dr. Atsuro Tsutsumi, Coordinator, International Institute for Global Health, UNU
    Ryo Goto, Communication Officer, Plan Japan

    Closing Remarks:

    Dr. Kim Yoshiharu, President, National Information Center of Disaster Mental Health, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan

    Contact Form







    JSDF: Legal Aid in Jordan

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Multimedia:
    To view videos by the Justice Center for Legal Aid (JCLA), please click below.
    (You will be taken to an external, youtube site.)
    Justice Center for Legal Aid (JCLA)
    The Law Protects You

    Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) Application Process and "Enhancing Community-Driven Legal Aid Services" in Jordan

    Wednesday, October 30, 5:30pm-8:30pm (JST)

    The World Bank Global Partnerships and Trust Fund Operations Department in cooperation with the Tokyo Development Learning Center) and the World Bank Tokyo Office will hold the sixth Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF) Dialogue Series: “JSDF Application Process” and “Community-driven Legal Aid in Jordan” on October 30, 2013.

    In this two-part session, a Bank staff will first introduce the unique features of the JSDF and its application process and a representative from Save the Children Japan, an implementing organization of a JSDF-funded project in Mongolia, will provide some practical advice related to the JSDF application process. In the second part of the session, the overview of the JSDF project, “Enhancing Community-Driven Legal Aid Services to the Poor” in Jordan, as well as its innovative aspects of its preparation, planning, execution, lessons learned and results to date will be explained.

    Despite gradual introduction of reforms, the judiciary bodies and legal services in Jordan are still underdeveloped, particularly as regards services to the poorest communities. The JSDF “Enhancing Community-Driven Legal Aid Services to the Poor” project administered by the World Bank, is supporting legal empowerment of the most vulnerable persons by improving justice sector services, based on the priorities of these poor communities and by allowing them to participate actively in project execution and monitoring.

    Legal aid services are an important means to promote greater access to justice for poor persons.  When targeted properly, legal aid ensures that the poor are aware of the rules that affect them, and learn how to hold the legal system accountable for enforcing them. Legal aid also functions as a ‘gateway’ service, allowing beneficiaries to access other services, such as court proceedings, entitlements, social protection benefits, and so forth.  When designed and implemented effectively, legal aid can also play a role in promoting equality and inclusion of poor communities. 

    This four-year project is building the capacity of the Justice Center for Legal Aid, the largest legal aid provider in and around Amman, to deliver legal aid services in a more effective and sustainable manner to over 15,000 beneficiaries, increase accessibility to justice and give hope to the poorest communities.

    About the Justice Center for Legal Aid (JCLA):

    Please click below to view videos by JCLA:
    (You will be taken to an external, youtube site.)

    Justice Center for Legal Aid (JCLA)
    The Law Protects You

    Testimonial by a project beneficiary:
    “The Justice Center for Legal Aid is the brother, the uncle and the father that stood beside me in my time of need. I will never forget what they did to help.” -Project Beneficiary

    About the Japan Social Development Fund (JSDF)

    The Government of Japan and the World Bank established JSDF in June 2000, with the goal of providing grants to support community-driven development and poverty reduction projects that empower and directly improve the lives of the poorest and most vulnerable groups not reached by other programs. A unique and valued feature of the JSDF program is that it provides a platform for cooperation with non-governmental agencies and other local stakeholders in the development process. The Government of Japan has support over 300 social development programs and projects, up to the end of June 2013.

    Date and Time

    Wednesday, October 30, 5:30pm-8:30pm (JST)

    Venue

    The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center
    10F, Fukoku Seimei Bldg. 2-2-2 Uchisaiwai-cho Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0011

    Language

    English and Japanese (with simultaneous interpretation)

    Program


    17:30-18:30 The Role of JSDF
    18:30-19:00 Background of the Project in Jordan
    19:00-20:30 “Enhancing Community-Driven Legal Aid Services to the Poor”

    Registration

    Advance registration required (first-come-first-served).
    Please register online from here.
    Please refrain from using the contact form below to register for this session.

    Contact Form







    Final Session: “Learning from Megadisasters”

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Presentation Materials:

    Federica_Ranghieri_presentation.pdf

    Mr._Tadao_Hasue_presentation.pdf

    Mr.Shingo_Kouchi_presentation.pdf

    Mr._Satoru_Mimura_presentation.pdf

    Ms._Mariko_Kinai_presentation.pdf

    Useful Links:

    How can we learn from megadisasters?

    Friday, October 18, 2013 (2pm-5pm)

    The World Bank and Japan started the project “Learning from Megadisasters” in October 2011. The project aims to share Japan’s knowledge on disaster risk management (DRM) and post disaster reconstruction with countries vulnerable to disasters. The project is collecting and analyzing information, data, and evaluations performed by academic and research institutions, nongovernmental organizations, government agencies, and the private sector. It covers activities of knowledge exchange, fostering cooperation with Japan and the developing countries by utilizing “Knowledge Notes: lessons from the Great East Japan Earthquake” and other products.

    The lessons assist capacity building of policy makers and practitioners by disseminating information through study tours, reports, workshops, e-learning, seminars organized through Global Development Learning Network, and Community of Practice (internet-based knowledge sharing site). In this seminar, project outcomes will be reported.

    At the seminar participants will discuss:
    • How is each organization sharing lessons from the GEJE with the World?
    • How can the country utilize these lessons to strengthen DRM?
    • How should Japan share the lessons from the GEJE with the world?

    Agenda

    2:00 pm Opening

    Yasusuke Tsukagoshi, Special Representative, Tokyo Office, The World Bank
    Ichiro Oishi, Ministry of Finance, Development Institutions Division

    2:20 pm Project Report

    Frederica Rangheri, Senior Urban Development Specialist, The World Bank Institute

    10 minute break

    2:50 - 4:50 pm Panel Discussion

    Shingo Kouchi, International Recovery Platform
    Mariko Kiuchi, World Vision Japan
    Kozo Nagami, JICA Tohoku
    Tadao Hasue and Kumi Onuma, Development Bank of Japan Inc.
    Satoru Mimura, Fukushima University

    4:50 pm Closing

    Frederica Rangheri

    MC: Mikio Ishiwatari, Senior Disaster Risk Management Specialist, WBI

    Organizer

    The World Bank

    Date

    Friday, October, 18, 2013

    Venue

    Tokyo Development Learning Center

    Contact Form







    Toward A Global Framework on Disaster Nursing: Lessons Learned from Asian Countries

    story from Tokyo Development Learning Center

    WB TDLC and Asia Conference on Emergency Medicine (ACEM) Joint Panel Discussion

    October 24, 2013 15:00-17:30

    ACEM 2013
    Mr. Fathoni presenting during the session.

    The Asia Pacific region is one of the most disaster prone regions in the world. The increasing number and diversity of natural and technological disasters pose severe physical and mental health threats resulting in a high number of deaths, injuries, illnesses, health system damage, personal suffering, and high economic costs. On the other hand, disasters, in spite of the adversity and challenges they create, provide openings to transform or strengthen health systems, health policies and programs, and community resilience.

    In such disaster situations, various health workers play key roles. Nursing is one of the most important and critical components in disaster health. Nurses often are the first, closest, most accessible and sustainable contacts for affected populations. In addition, nurses often play coordination roles and/or contribute to policy and system development. However, disaster nursing has a tendency of being marginalized in the international discourse despite its importance and impact on health, human rights and poverty alleviation.

    ACEM participants
    Participants at TDLC.

    This panel discussion will provide an overview of the state-of-the-art global frameworks for disaster nursing in the broader context of health system strengthening, and then examine on-the-ground experiences from Japan, India, Indonesia, and Thailand for future policy and program implications. The panelists will discuss about the successes and failures and current gaps in both practical and policy/program arenas, and explore options for better services, collaboration and mutual support in Asia and beyond for the future. During the panel discussion, three countries will be connected via video-conferencing for live interaction among participants in all connecting countries.

    Venue:

    The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC), Japan

    Connecting Sites:

    India, Philippines, and Thailand

    Panelists:

    Kathleen Fritsch, Regional Advisor in Nursing, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, The World Health Organization
    Midori Matsuzuki, Executive Officer, Japanese Nursing Association
    Yoko Kawatani, Certified Nurse for Emergency Care, Aichi Medical University
    T.S. Ravi Kumar, Professor, Head of Emergency Nursing, College of Nursing, Christian Medical College Vellore, India
    Mukhamad Fathoni, Faculty of Medicine, University of Brawijaya, Indoesia
    Orapan Thosingha, Faculty of Nursing, Mahidol University & Asia Pacific Emergency and Disaster Nursing Network (APEDNN), Thailand

    Moderators:

    Takashi Izutsu, Senior Knowledge Management Officer, The World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center
    Mieko Ishii, Associate Professor, Kitasato University

    Contact Form